Schultz Method

Charlie

Arachnobaron
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Aug 27, 2002
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368
Ok, I know that everybody here has probably allready read The Tarantula Keepers Guide by Schultz and Shultz about a million times but I am on my first and I have a question on the way he says to handle Tarantulas.

Why in the world would anybody ever do that? Is this really the right way to pick up a t? It would seem to me that it is a sure way to get bit!

If I am wrong then I am wrong but I dont like it at all. What are some of your opinions?

-Charlie
 

Steve Nunn

Arachnoprince
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Aug 30, 2002
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1,777
Originally posted by Charlie

Why in the world would anybody ever do that? Is this really the right way to pick up a t? It would seem to me that it is a sure way to get bit!

-Charlie
Hi Charlie,
If you're not confidant about it, don't try it. I'd assume you're talking about the cupping method(correct way #3)? All I keep are nasty old worlders (Selenocosmia, Selenotypus, Phlogiellus and Coremiocnemis) and to be honest, I'd never try this method, it would be a sure way for me to get bit. This method may be successful for some people, with the most passive tarantulas, but I know of about three cases where people have been bit using this method on what were believed to be quiet, docile new world spiders(and whoever wrote about tarantulas not actually being spiders, do some research).

I'm not saying cupping the tarantula doesn't work, it may for some. But I think if you are hesitant to use this method, it may be best to actually have someone experienced in handling to show you first hand.

Cheers,
Steve
 

Chris

Arachnoknight
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Joined
Aug 9, 2002
Messages
284
I think this like anything would require some practice.

It looks good in theory... but I haven't tried this method myself. I prefer the old fashioned let the spider climb aboard method.
 

chid

Arachnoknight
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Oct 8, 2002
Messages
273
I suppose its down to confidence whichever method anybody uses.
I dont pick uo any of mine but then I dont feel confident yet.
Chid
 

Jack III

Arachnocultured
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Nov 4, 2002
Messages
93
This method appears to be more restraint vs. handling. Done properly and you will not be bitten. Done inproperly, I can see the potential for injury, both to handler and T. I have been warned by other enthusiests to never consider using this method to engage a pet due to the risk of injuring it. I personally have never witnessed anyone try it. Good luck if you do.
 

Immortal_sin

Arachnotemptress
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Jul 17, 2002
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3,955
I tried it *once* in order to take a picture of my G rosea's ventral side. She had a weird coloration on one of her book lungs, and I wanted to take a pic and examine it more closely.
She was not particularly happy about it. She wiggled, I squeezed, and since I was afraid of squeezing TOO much, I promptly relaxed my hand, she turned over, and proceeded to extend her fangs till they were touching my palm. Suspecting she was about to deliver a nice deep bite, I immediately shooed her off my hand!
I ended up sticking her in the fridge for 3 minutes (I think) so she was slow enough for me to be able to get the pics I needed.

We also have a PZB female that we can do this with. However, since she molted, she has become a holy terror, and I won't handle her LOL
 

Kaissos5

Arachnosquire
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Dec 29, 2002
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51
i would say it depends on the species, what type do you have? With my rosea i just put one hand infront of her and if needed do a slight touch to the rear legs and never had a problem.
 

T. blondi

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 6, 2003
Messages
23
I suppose that the picture in the book does'nt lie; and that method probably works for the authors. But since the day I saw it in the book, I knew I'd never try it. Looks like a good way to get bitten.
 

Bjorgly

Arachnodemon
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Aug 7, 2002
Messages
729
I've picked up my B.smithi (adult female) like this before, while Stan Schultz was right there beside me telling me how to do it and the spider did not care at all. I also watched him reach in and pick up a H.minax using this method with perfect success.

Mark
 

Steve Nunn

Arachnoprince
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Aug 30, 2002
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1,777
Originally posted by Bjorgly
I've picked up my B.smithi (adult female) like this before, while Stan Schultz was right there beside me telling me how to do it and the spider did not care at all. I also watched him reach in and pick up a H.minax using this method with perfect success.

Mark
Hi Mark,
I'm sure this method works, but do you believe you could pick up any tarantula using this method if Stan wasn't there beside you?

My only point here is unless you have someone experienced with this method beside you (as Stan was for you), things could go wrong a lot quicker then most of the other methods. Unfortunately, most aren't in the position to have Stan beside them when they try this for the first time.

Also, when picking up a tarantula like this, I can guarantee that the spider will care. As the trichobothria (prime sensory setae located on the dorsal surface of the femora, amongst other places including the tibia)are actually bent! These setae detect the slightest air movements, alerting the spider to possible danger or prey. You could imagine how much of an intrusion actually touching the trichobothria would be for a tarantula. Fact of the matter is when a spider is picked up like this, it's a restraining technique in which the spider has no option but to remain still.

I see your point though, this method does work when done properly.

Cheers,
Steve
 

Bjorgly

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Messages
729
Steve,

I was scared dispite the fact Stan was right there beside me because it was the first time i ever picked up a tarantula. I would not pick up just any tarantula with this method. Stan picked up a H.minax this way but he has had many many years of experience. I have made the decision not to handle any of my tarantulas for the safety of them, not me. However i am raising a pulchra sling to be my "handler". I have not intentially handled a tarantula since unless absolutely necessary. Stan picked up several tarantulas there, to demonstrate the technique and to show tarantulas to potential customers, and just as all the ones he picked up did, when i put mine down it did not care at all it just sat there and slowly started walking when i put it down. I'm sure if it was at all painful for the spider, Stan of all people would make a point of telling people about it. You just have to be super gentle. I asked him if it bothered the tarantulas and he said it doesnt bother them at all.

Mark
 
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