Saw my ......... today

Jason B

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Sep 10, 2016
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We have a thread for molting and they'll prolly be some overlap since some Ts hide during premolt. But then theres also those T you see so rarely its exciting. Mines not quite so dramatic but I saw my P. Irminia today for the first time since early april, close to two months. But i got to see all of it and this is the second time thats happened, the first was the 10 seconds after unpacking then it found its hide and its only been legs. irminia.jpg irminia2.JPG irminia3.JPG
 

sasker

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Oct 9, 2016
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Just a question, where is your P. irminia normally hiding ? I am interested in this arboreal species, but by the look of it, you keep it terrestrial (it could be just the angle of the photograph). I hear many people say this species is not often visible, but I wonder if it is more visible if there are more arboreal-like places to hide behind (Like a vertical piece of cork bark with fake leaves hot-glued to it). Stunning species, but if it is hardly ever visible, I would rather go for another species as I have limited space.

I like the idea of this thread! Sorry I hijacked it with an off-topic question :embarrassed:
 

Jason B

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Sep 10, 2016
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Alot of arboreal slings prefer to burrow, the exception is Avics and their cousins but almost all other arboreals spend most of their time burrowing. And become more arboreal when they get older, this guy kinda grew quite a bit with his last molt and I will be making some modifications to his enclosure but its final home will be much more arboreal in design.

This species is know to be reclusive if visibility is a big thing P. cambridgei are much more of a visible psalm.
 

The Grym Reaper

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Stunning species, but if it is hardly ever visible, I would rather go for another species as I have limited space.

I like the idea of this thread! Sorry I hijacked it with an off-topic question :embarrassed:
Mine is out pretty often and she usually makes her web tubes in places where I can see into them (so I can see her even when she is hiding).
I was expecting to literally never, ever see mine based off what people on here have said.


Back on topic: I saw my E. cyanognathus' legs poking out of it's burrow and I caught my ghost of a P. cambridgei fully out of it's web tube/burrow for the first time in weeks (honestly, the only reason I know it's still alive sometimes is because the odd bolus or pile of substrate turns up in the water dish).
 

GreyPsyche

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Jun 19, 2016
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Yeah, I also noticed this terrestrial style set up..strange.

My P. Cam sling is set up in an arboreal enclosure but I haven't seen her in probably a month or maybe more. She went straight to the bottom and burrowed, I'm gonna give her a better hide and better coverage after her next molt.
 

Jason B

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Sep 10, 2016
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Yeah, I also noticed this terrestrial style set up..strange.

My P. Cam sling is set up in an arboreal enclosure but I haven't seen her in probably a month or maybe more. She went straight to the bottom and burrowed, I'm gonna give her a better hide and better coverage after her next molt.
What you just described is why I set mine up that way. I learned my lesson trying to give pokie slings arboreal setups. they just dig in the dirt and burrow anyway so I give them what they prefer. Now if it was an avic sling I would have given it an arboreal setup. I have a few fake plants that I was gonna add to its enclosure before it sealed up its hide, I decided to wait until after I knew for sure if it was gonna molt.
 

GreyPsyche

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I think mine would live more like an arboreal if I gave it some foliage and bark to climb but I gave her a very minimal set up of some simple driftwood. But I don't really know for sure until I try moving her which will hopefully be soon as she hasn't ate in a long while so I'm hoping PreMolt.
 

user 666

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Jan 27, 2017
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My irminia is in a mixed enclosure. It has enough substrate to burrow in and it also has the fake plants and cork bark you would expect in an arboreal enclosure.

One of the first things it did when it moved in was web a dirt tunnel on the back of the vertical cork bark. That is its hide, and then it added to the hide by digging tunnels under the substrate.

so don't worry about keeping an irmina sling as a terrestrial; it will turn an arboreal setup into a terrestrial one.
 

Andrea82

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Jan 12, 2016
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Have no 'saw my.....today' to add, but have an addition to the terrestrial/arboreal set up with Psalmopoeus. My pulchers burrowed behind their bark up until 10 cm DLS. They now both have built webtunnels that start at the bottom but reach round and round almost to the top. It is like one if those waterslides. They are adding dirt to it for more cover. I think it looks great :D. I have potato cam, else I would show it :)
 

basin79

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Sep 14, 2013
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I made a thread called "At Last" regarding my own elusive tarantulas, but just ended up using it as my general thread.

By for I thought my most elusive is my Cyriopagopus hati hati. However I've started to see her out a little bit now. Although she soon hides away again when she realises she's being watched.

My Poecilotheria tigrinawesseli has turned into my most elusive tarantula now. I thought she was in premoult (she's been hidden away for months). But she resurfaced a month or so ago to nab a few blue bottles at the top of her tube.

Since then she went back to ground. The other day she partially broke through some of her silk and I could see her again. No moult to see. Not sure what she's doing.
 

basin79

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Just a question, where is your P. irminia normally hiding ? I am interested in this arboreal species, but by the look of it, you keep it terrestrial (it could be just the angle of the photograph). I hear many people say this species is not often visible, but I wonder if it is more visible if there are more arboreal-like places to hide behind (Like a vertical piece of cork bark with fake leaves hot-glued to it). Stunning species, but if it is hardly ever visible, I would rather go for another species as I have limited space.

I like the idea of this thread! Sorry I hijacked it with an off-topic question :embarrassed:
My adult female Cyriopagopus hati hati lives underground in a tunnel she dug out. She's got a slab of cork bark but decided to dig tunnel. She thinks she's a Bach ma.
 

Nightstalker47

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Jul 2, 2016
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Alot of arboreal slings prefer to burrow, the exception is Avics and their cousins but almost all other arboreals spend most of their time burrowing. And become more arboreal when they get older, this guy kinda grew quite a bit with his last molt and I will be making some modifications to his enclosure but its final home will be much more arboreal in design.

This species is know to be reclusive if visibility is a big thing P. cambridgei are much more of a visible psalm.
My 3 irminia are setup in a similar fashion, all have built web tunnels along the corners and burrowed down a little. As they grow they will become more true to their arboreal nature, as slings they tend to stay close to the ground.
 

Tanner Dzula

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Feb 29, 2016
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well, i didn't really "see" her out, but i did wake up to find that my A. Chalcodes had finally re-amerged from her Sealed burrow after this most recent molt (literally alosmt 6 months in there), same only enclosure bit with a ~2inch hole through the sealed burrow.
i did look through the hole to see a glimpse of her back too legs, which was nice.
 

PanzoN88

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Sep 15, 2014
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693
This was last night, but I caught my N. Chromatus out of its burrow, and it is in need of a rehouse very soon (next molt)
 
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