S. hainanum On Eggs

LawnShrimp

Arachnoangel
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Dec 9, 2016
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I was walking past my 'pede-keeping area and saw some yellow stuff near my smallest hainanum, and I realized she was laying eggs!
I got another photo...
...And another when she finished the clutch.
She hasn't burrowed at all, and hasn't eaten any eggs so far. As she is wild caught and recently acquired, she definitely could have laid fertile eggs. I have her in a dark, quiet corner with a black bag over her enclosure so that no light gets in.

So, how long do hainanum take to hatch? What temperature is perfect for them? Currently, I keep them at 72-77 F (22-25 C).

I hope they are fertile. It is a small clutch, only about 20 eggs, so hopefully I won't have too many plings running about!
 

Staehilomyces

Arachnoprince
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Mar 2, 2016
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Centipedes eggs generally take a little over a month to develop. Then, the babies stay with the mother for another month or so. When the eggs are about to morph into pedelings, they first increase in size, then they flatten. After that, they take on an appearance that resembles a curled up millipede. Finally, they open, and become mobile pedelings.
 

Salvador

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This may depend on temps too, possibly other factors relating to egg/yolk sizes. It's taken close to 3.5 months for my S.alternans to develop to a point where they're about to moult to independants. I recall seeing info on this site about S.hainanum incubation times which were noted, try searching under "Tiger Legs" too, as there will be plenty of info about them here which came before the name was official a few years ago.
 

LawnShrimp

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Centipedes eggs generally take a little over a month to develop. Then, the babies stay with the mother for another month or so. When the eggs are about to morph into pedelings, they first increase in size, then they flatten. After that, they take on an appearance that resembles a curled up millipede. Finally, they open, and become mobile pedelings.
This may depend on temps too, possibly other factors relating to egg/yolk sizes. It's taken close to 3.5 months for my S.alternans to develop to a point where they're about to moult to independents.
Ok, so three months at most. I'll get a better heat mat, unless it isn't necessary?
 

Salvador

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I would say not, S.hainanum don't do well in high heat, I'd say your temps of 22-25 are fine.
 

LawnShrimp

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I would say not, S.hainanum don't do well in high heat, I'd say your temps of 22-25 are fine.
That's what I thought! The guy who sold me these thinks they prefer warmer temperatures, and I listened to him. Right now it is probably over 90 in Hainan now; it is a very warm place year-round. Thanks for confirmation.
 

LawnShrimp

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Update: another hainanum laid eggs. She's larger than the first one and I think her clutch is larger as well. She's been on eggs for about three weeks now.
25 days from being laid, the first centipedes' eggs have all become protonymphs, the little croisssant-baby stage. According to you guys, I'll have baby hainanum in about another month!
 

kermitdsk

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Ok, so three months at most. I'll get a better heat mat, unless it isn'tnecessary?
You should never use a heat mat for centipedes. When a centipede feels to hot it will digg in the substrate and hide if you use a heat mat that could end tragically.

Nice pics and good luck. One time I also had a Hainanum female on eggs after mating but unfortunately it ate the eggs after about three weeks.
 

LawnShrimp

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You should never use a heat mat for centipedes. When a centipede feels to hot it will digg in the substrate and hide if you use a heat mat that could end tragically. Nice pics and good luck. One time I also had a Hainanum female on eggs after mating but unfortunately it ate the eggs after about three weeks.
Thanks. I was just worried as every room that I can keep dark enough for them gets pretty chilly in winter. Their enclosures are resting on the floor and so I was afraid the substrate might get too cold. Would it be good to keep a heat mat near but not too close to the container so that there is a little warmth? Or can centipedes (S. hainanum, S. morsitans 'Chinese Brownback', S. s. mutilans, R. longipes) handle temperatures of below 70F?
 

LawnShrimp

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The babies in the previous picture have molted to the next stage! They are not hardened yet and do not have color. SO far they have gone from egg-protonymph-white pling- to where they are now, as mobile juveniles. When they have hardened is it okay to feed something them and their mother? She is painfully thin. I have seen pictures of someone feeding an incubating mother Ethmostigmus with juveniles; she cut it open so her young and her could feed. Is this safe to do?
 

Salvador

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You should be totally safe, the time for them going off themselves is imminent anyway, might as well make everyone fat before they part ways ;)
 

LawnShrimp

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Somewhat related to that, winter is fast approaching here, and temperatures are dropping to a 18-20-ish C°. I know heat mats are discouraged, especially with this species, but will the babies, small as they are, be safe at such a temperature? It gets warmer near the heating system of the house but that might cook the little guys.

Also, are deli cups good for separating plings? I was considering clear plastic drink cups with lids as they are taller, smoother, and less wide for storage purposes. I suppose that deli cups might be good because they can stack, but I don't really have the room for 100+ deli cups.
 

LeFanDesBugs

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Mar 14, 2015
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I was looking forward to buying plings but I'm from UE. :(
Deli cups should be fine as far as separating goes. When it comes to heat, idk. 18-20 doesn't seem to low to me considering the temperatures the adults live at. Shouldn't be a problem but make sure it doesn't drop below that
 
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