Rosie on her back 6 weeks prior to molting

colker

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 17, 2016
Messages
22
My 3 year old Rosie was transfered into a larger tank earlier this year to more antiquity fit her growing size. She refused her food for the first time after 8 months being in her new environment, so we knew she was getting ready to molt. She ran her silk and flipped over, but that's where she stayed for the next 6+ weeks. After the initial 72 hours I had read nearly every form, and adhered to their advice, maintained water intake and humidity, still she remained in her back. All except cutting her out, every story of "helping" their t out of their molt resulted in the t dying, so I thought it would be best to let her work it out.

She went through a very still time, motionless for two weeks. To the point you thought she moved, but it was most likely myself over staring. After two weeks we were ready to accept she was gone, but that's when it became interesting
She started to stretch out, very much alive! She's lived in our bathroom for the past 3+ weeks, enjoying the humidity from the daily showers. Now finally, she's pulling herself from her molt. It's been 24 hours, and her legs are pulled back and I believe her back hatch has poped, since I can no longer see beneath her.

My question is, has anyone experience a peculiar molt after enlarging its environment? Does it go through a rapid growth period? Why would she choose to be on her back for so long prior to lilting? Any advice that anyone has on a similar experience is greatly appreciated! I understand this is highly unusual.

Thanks you!
 

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
403
Wow that an amazing story, glad she's finally decided to molt! I've never heard of a T taking that long, maybe someone else has and will chime in.
 

colker

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 17, 2016
Messages
22
No typo, she's still on her back. I've read many forms and have not seen anything similar, so I sstarted this thread in hops someone has experienced something similar.
Please ignor the auto corrections
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
I had the same concern, but after a couple weeks I had to make drastic measures.
After a couple of weeks I'd have a new spider in that enclosure and she'd be in the trash o_O

@viper69, you're not allowed to make fun of my Area 51 shenanigans anymore. This takes the cake by far. This is some Chernobyl nonsense right here.
 

Octagon

Arachnoperson
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
39
Wow, this is incredible. Here's hoping she completes that moult. She is headed for the record books.
 

cold blood

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My 3 year old Rosie was transfered into a larger tank earlier this year to more antiquity fit her growing size. She refused her food for the first time after 8 months being in her new environment, so we knew she was getting ready to molt. She ran her silk and flipped over, but that's where she stayed for the next 6+ weeks. After the initial 72 hours I had read nearly every form, and adhered to their advice, maintained water intake and humidity, still she remained in her back. All except cutting her out, every story of "helping" their t out of their molt resulted in the t dying, so I thought it would be best to let her work it out.

She went through a very still time, motionless for two weeks. To the point you thought she moved, but it was most likely myself over staring. After two weeks we were ready to accept she was gone, but that's when it became interesting
She started to stretch out, very much alive! She's lived in our bathroom for the past 3+ weeks, enjoying the humidity from the daily showers. Now finally, she's pulling herself from her molt. It's been 24 hours, and her legs are pulled back and I believe her back hatch has poped, since I can no longer see beneath her.

My question is, has anyone experience a peculiar molt after enlarging its environment? Does it go through a rapid growth period? Why would she choose to be on her back for so long prior to lilting? Any advice that anyone has on a similar experience is greatly appreciated! I understand this is highly unusual.

Thanks you!
3 years?? Did you raise it from a 2i sling? How big is the specimen...it takes nearly a decade for them to mature.

Now it was the case, but refusal of food isn't an indicator of pre-molt for this species, its just what they do, they're master fasters.

Adhered to advice about water intake and humidity? Curious what this is, as this species has NO humidity requirements, preferring it to be dry...even when they molt. As for water intake, that's pretty much up to the spider as they will generally take a big drink in preparation...all you need to do is keep water in the dish.

The bathroom idea is a terrible one, especially for a dry species such as this...I will never ever recommend someone keeping any t in the bathroom.

I'm shocked that the t is molting after this amount of time...this is basically unheard of and from a biological standpoint, it just shouldn't happen. T's don't go on their backs in advance of molting...this is very interesting though for sure, and I'm thrilled that the t did pull off a molt after all that time.

Keep us posted....my first thought was that it was a MM having a rare post-ultimate molt...which this species will, albeit rarely, pull off successfully.

Supply us with pics...many pics please;)
 
Last edited:

colker

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 17, 2016
Messages
22
3 years?? Did you raise it from a 2i sling? How big is the specimen...it takes nearly a decade for them to mature.

Now it was the case, but refusal of food isn't an indicator of pre-molt for this species, its just what they do, they're master fasters.

Adhered to advice about water intake and humidity? Curious what this is, as this species has NOP humidity requirements, preferring it to be dry...even when they molt. As for water intake, that's pretty much up to the spider as they will generally take a big drink in preparation...all you need to do is keep water in the dish.

The bathroom idea is a terrible one, especially for a dry species such as this...I will never ever recommend someone keeping any t in the bathroom.

I'm shocked that the t is molting after this amount of time...this is basically unheard of and from a biological standpoint, it just shouldn't happen. T's don't go on their backs in advance of molting...this is very interesting though for sure, and I'm thrilled that the t did pull off a molt after all that time.

Keep us posted....my first thought was that it was a MM having a rare post-ultimate molt...which this species will, albeit rarely, pull off successfully.

Supply us with pics...many pics please;)
I received her at a reptile convention, she came in a small "hot sauce" type plastic container, nearly too small to see. She's now currently 4 inches wide. I'll list photos soon. I don't want to disturb her too much while she's trying to pull from her molt. I will post her positions in the different stages.

I've gone back in forth as to it being a dry climent species, but taking further action when we past two weeks. I had to do something, or feel cruel to leave it with no assistance. Should I stand by and let her die in the molt, stuck? That's not my nature.

Even if she had taken a large drink prior, it wouldn't have sustained her for 6 weeks. I give her a couple drops ever couple days. Never more than she's able to drink.

I agree this is highly unheard of. My friend says she's possessed. But the fact remaines, she is alive and has shown progress since being in the bathroom. Everyone needs to go to the spa now and then ;)

I hope she pulls through, but you can't help think this is too odd to feel confident.

Could you please elaborate, "my first thought was that it was a MM having a rare post-ultimate molt...which this species will, albeit rarely, pull off successfully."
Thank you!
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
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I received her at a reptile convention, she came in a small "hot sauce" type plastic container, nearly too small to see. She's now currently 4 inches wide.
Not that it really matters given the current situation, but I doubt that you have a G. rosea/porteri. They simply don't grow that fast.
 
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