Rhino beetles as pets and other pet beetles

bugmankeith

Arachnoking
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Jun 4, 2006
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I bought a preserved Atlas Beetle (chalcosoma caucasus) at a fair, really expensive by the way! The guy who sold it actually breeds them himself here in NY, is there sites you can buy them as pets in the U.S., and other large pet beetles? I want one male as a pet (not to breed). I heard they make good pets and eat fruit like apples and bananas, but dont live long, but that's ok to me.
 

Elytra and Antenna

Arachnoking
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They only have adults of a native rhino. You are unlikely to find anyone selling atlas grubs (which take one year).
 

bugmankeith

Arachnoking
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Wow that place has lots of cool critters, thanks for the help. The largest beetles are sold out right now though. Mabye next year perhaps?
 

What

Arachnoprince
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Let me take the opportunity to remind *everyone*(yes you Orin) that keeping/selling live non-native beetles/their larvae and/or phasmids is illegal in the USA...

The USDA/APHIS unfortunately *do* care and *do* monitor the forums...
 

bugmankeith

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How can a tropical species be invasive in a climate that gets freezing Winter's, unless of course it's a cockroach that can survive inside a house, but your talking about a very large beetle that would die indoors. I never understood this?
 

insect714

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Nov 18, 2005
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How can a tropical species be invasive in a climate that gets freezing Winter's, unless of course it's a cockroach that can survive inside a house, but your talking about a very large beetle that would die indoors. I never understood this?
Keith keep in mind they don't always take into account the survivability of a species when they are looking at "invasiveness", when the USDA is baning species they look more at the potential damage it can cause if it was here "in season" and for a species that spends a good amount of time underground it is going to be flagged quick because even if you have killer winters in an area there are areas underground (forget the figure) that even in those freezing conditions can maintain an ambient temp warm enough to support the larvae.

But trust me I had the same questions when I was keeping Phasmids, but there is a permit you can get thru the USDA to keep "ban" inverts, it can be a pain to get and requires some inspections of the facility they are going to be kept, and some legal contracts about not selling, or distributing your "legal" stock (not to mention its not cheap or quick)
 
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