researching 1st tarantula

AmberDawnDays

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I've never owned a spider, but they have always fascinated me and I am very interested in getting a tarantula. I've very recently started doing a little research into the different tarantula breeds. Below I've listed the ones I've come across that interest me the most and why they interest me.

1. Grammostola pulcha (Brazilian black): beautiful, fairly large size, known to be calm
2. grammostola pulchripes (chaco golden knee): large size, good eaters, known to be calm, busy bodies, fast growing
3. brachypelma albpiloseum (curlyhair): usually captive breed, known to be calm,
4. brachypelma smithi (mexican red knee): usually captive breed, beautiful coloration, mild temperament

I would like a docile breed, larger is better, I like black coloration or bright colors (but that isnt the most important factor), and a breed that is active is preferrable.

Any input on which breed is best for a beginner is appreciated. Please comment on what I've listed and also let me know about other great beginner breads. I'm unsure of the best place to purchase from too, so help with that would be awesome!

I currently have 3 cats, 1 sun conure parrot, and 1 rat as pets. I'm not sure if that matters.

Thanks,
Amber
 

Venom1080

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those are all great beginner species. try to go for a sexed female, as those are all slow growing. other great beginner genera are Euathlus, and Eupalaestrus Campestratus. as for breeders, check out @cold blood , im pretty sure he has some G pulchripes for sale. jamies tarantulas, and ken the bug guy are also good places.
 

cold blood

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Yes, as venom mentioned, these are individual species, not breeds, which are all the same species.

You have listed for two of them "usually captive bred"....this actually describes most species in the hobby. I'd be surprised to find wild caught specimens of any of the species you listed.

The best bang for the buck, and one of the best all time beginners is G. pulchripes. Its also the largest of all the species you listed. pulchra actually isn't a really large species, pretty much average for a terrestrial I'd say.

Juvie pulchripes are hard to beat though.
 

Haemus

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I went with the G. pulchripes as my first T almost a year ago. No regrets :)
 

Walker253

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You can't go wrong with a G pulchripes. To me, perfect all around first tarantula. But really, you mention the Grammostola pulchra. If you can afford it, especially a sexed female, absolutely don't think twice about acquiring one. It was #1 on my want list. When I finally got her, wow!
As a first tarantula, I would suggest at least a juvenile. If you can go bigger, great. I wouldn't do a spiderling. They are a little fragile. A bigger tarantula is more forgiving of a mistake, a little hardier, and a little easier to see. Load up on slings later.
Your other pets are of no significance, unless your cats get too interested.
 

BorisTheSpider

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I currently have 3 cats . . . . I'm not sure if that matters.
Cats can be a problem . They are remarkably good predators who are able to notice even the smallest movement . If they get the idea that there is something small and crawling around they will find it . I have heard of them knocking enclosures off of shelves or tables . In a cat versus a T scenario the cat always wins . My advise to keep your T in a place where the cats won't have access .
 

Chris LXXIX

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I always had lots of cats and T's and never had a problem. Still today I have four cats and 20 inverts (mostly NW intermediate/OW Baboons and a S.subspinipes) and never had a problem.

But my cat are vicious predators as well, by far better than T's, and mostly they are out killing "those who fly" on a regular basis... my garden is the "warehouse" of dead pidgeons and even parrots in Summer.

Btw check this badass cat destroying a quite fast Theraphosidae and that "ninja/Jap" style music:

 

Draketeeth

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#2 or #3 are both awesome, can't go wrong with either. The B. albo was my first sling and I really love it--- very active diggers who aren't too concerned with making a jail break. Got a G. pulchripes sling later down the road and love it almost a little more than the curlys if only because it's out in the open more and I like watching its colors improve with every molt, but mine hasn't been much of a digger. My Goldenknee also is a bit more skittish at times, but never threatening. I'm hoping it will grow out of skittishness and mellow with age. My curlys will likely be forever per holes. All head for their burrows when I need to mess in their tanks, and I've never really worried for my or their safety.
 

AmberDawnDays

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Yes, as venom mentioned, these are individual species, not breeds, which are all the same species.

You have listed for two of them "usually captive bred"....this actually describes most species in the hobby. I'd be surprised to find wild caught specimens of any of the species you listed.

The best bang for the buck, and one of the best all time beginners is G. pulchripes. Its also the largest of all the species you listed. pulchra actually isn't a really large species, pretty much average for a terrestrial I'd say.

Juvie pulchripes are hard to beat though.
Im still a bit confused about the breed / species thing. I definitely need to do more research.

I was also unsure about how many were actually captive breed or not because while researching some said captive breed and some didn't.
 

AmberDawnDays

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You can't go wrong with a G pulchripes. To me, perfect all around first tarantula. But really, you mention the Grammostola pulchra. If you can afford it, especially a sexed female, absolutely don't think twice about acquiring one. It was #1 on my want list. When I finally got her, wow!
I think I definitely will get a g. pulchra eventually, but maybe it won't be my 1ST one. There are so many that I want.
Just curious what you love most about your g. pulchra?
 
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AmberDawnDays

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Oh my goodness, what the heck happened with that last post of mine? is this what I get for doing this on my phone? YIKES...

I fixed it though, so if you saw that...YIKES.

Thanks everyone for all your help so far. I have some reading to do and other threads to check out that I've been told about
 
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Moonohol

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I think I definitely will get a g. pulchra eventually, but maybe it won't be my 1ST one. There are so many that I want.
Just curious what you love most about your g. pulchra?
I just gotta say that G. pulchra is one of my favorite Ts ever and they make an awesome beginner T. It's true they don't get as big as G. pulchripes, but they still have a great feeding response and tend not to be pet rocks like G. rosea or G. porteri. There is something about a completely jet black tarantula that is just so awesome to me. My G. pulchra is very docile; cage maintenance for it is a breeze and it's always out and about for easy viewing as well. If your pick comes down to pulchripes and pulchra, just go with the one you want more; care for them is identical and you won't be disappointed either way. I believe pulchripes do tend to grow faster than pulchra though, so definitely be aware of that.
 

AmberDawnDays

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I just gotta say that G. pulchra is one of my favorite Ts ever and they make an awesome beginner T. It's true they don't get as big as G. pulchripes, but they still have a great feeding response and tend not to be pet rocks like G. rosea or G. porteri. There is something about a completely jet black tarantula that is just so awesome to me. My G. pulchra is very docile; cage maintenance for it is a breeze and it's always out and about for easy viewing as well. If your pick comes down to pulchripes and pulchra, just go with the one you want more; care for them is identical and you won't be disappointed either way. I believe pulchripes do tend to grow faster than pulchra though, so definitely be aware of that.
I agree about the jet black. That's what really pulls me towards wanting one so much. I hear they are expensive. Does $400 for a fully grown female sound right? That's what I've found.

Do you have a recommendation for where I can purchase one? I have gone back and forth a bit, but I know I want one for sure.

I'm still thinking it will be a few months before I can swing it though. I gotta get through Christmas first!
 

Moonohol

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I agree about the jet black. That's what really pulls me towards wanting one so much. I hear they are expensive. Does $400 for a fully grown female sound right? That's what I've found.

Do you have a recommendation for where I can purchase one? I have gone back and forth a bit, but I know I want one for sure.

I'm still thinking it will be a few months before I can swing it though. I gotta get through Christmas first!
$400 sounds about on target for an adult female, though I've seen them for cheaper. If I were you, I'd look for a juvenile instead, as they're just as easy to care for and they're going to be more affordable. Jamie's Tarantulas currently has some G. pulchra slings on sale for a very affordable price; I got mine from her and I can vouch that she's an excellent vendor to buy from. The only thing to be aware of when buying a sling is that they are pretty slow growing, especially if you aren't keeping them at decently warm temps (75F+). Another great place to keep an eye out is the classifieds here. You tend to find better deals that way too.
 

AmberDawnDays

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$400 sounds about on target for an adult female, though I've seen them for cheaper. If I were you, I'd look for a juvenile instead, as they're just as easy to care for and they're going to be more affordable. Jamie's Tarantulas currently has some G. pulchra slings on sale for a very affordable price; I got mine from her and I can vouch that she's an excellent vendor to buy from. The only thing to be aware of when buying a sling is that they are pretty slow growing, especially if you aren't keeping them at decently warm temps (75F+). Another great place to keep an eye out is the classifieds here. You tend to find better deals that way too.
Awesome! Thanks so much. I'll definitely check out both.
 
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