Replacing Exo Terra mesh

Alana

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 26, 2016
Messages
20
Hi. I have 2 exo terras that I will be replacing the mesh on tomorrow. I'm using the plastic from the sides of an old Really Useful Box that my kids broke the bottom of (I told them not to jump on the lid, so they turned it upside down and jumped on the bottom instead *sigh*).
I'm just looking for recommendations on the quantity, size and placement of the air holes I'll be drilling. As the lower vents are at the front, would it be best to place the air holes towards the back of the lid so that there is maximum air flow through the enclosure? Or have them at the front so that there is more of a microclimate towards the back half? Or all over? Would lots of very small holes be better or fewer larger ones? I'm sure I'm overthinking this, but I'd rather do it properly now before the Ts go in.
They are for juvenile P. formosa and A. bicegoi.
Many thanks in advance.

(BTW, I realise that enclosures with more cross ventilation would be preferred, but as I already have these, and they can be locked to prevent access by my children, I would rather stick with these.)
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
14,336
A. bicegoi
You really could do whatever you wanted. No one has studied this scientifically. The European glass cubes I've seen, typically have a screen across the middle of the top, and the metal screen at the front. My understanding of the UK weather is VERY limited, I believe it to be colder there more often than not. I would drill small holes and not too many to minimize air transfer.

It's easier to drill MORE holes later, than to replace it or cover up the holes later if there are too many.

I sure wish we could get A bicegoi back here in the USA. Would you post a pic of your bicegoi when you get a chance please.
 

Alana

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 26, 2016
Messages
20
Thank you. That's a good point about being able to drill extra holes if needed. I'll try drilling smaller holes and having them across the middle like the European cubes and see how it goes.
The temperature here at this time of year is in the 70s with 50-90% humidity depending on time of day. We might get up to 85F on an exceptionally hot day. We don't have air con or fans, so the air in the house doesn't get dried out at this time of year, but when the central heating goes on in the winter it'll get pretty dry, but the house will stay around 70F. So not having excessive ventilation would probably be beneficial in the winter. As we're an island, we don't have huge swings of temperature like you get in Central Europe or in the USA.
I only have my phone camera, but I'll do my best to get some decent photos when I receive it on Wednesday.
 
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