Rehousing vids on YouTube......really?

Matttoadman

Arachnoknight
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Aug 11, 2016
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216
So I have been watching rehousing vids. Some young dude has a kritter keeper next to a tank and he's trying to coax a large angry Cyriopagopus sps. With a paint brush from one to the other. Then he swears as it bites at him. Surely this isn't the proper way to rehouse a fast defensive t? Because if that's so, no wonder why OW's aren't recommended for beginners. Please can I get a description of a proper rehouse. Or a good vid link.
 

Moonohol

Two Legged Freak
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Aug 8, 2016
Messages
115
I don't think I've seen a single rehousing video of an OW on YouTube that was done "correctly." It's almost always something similar to what you described. I use the bag method to deal with my P. metallica: place a plastic bag over the opening of the enclosure, poke a paintbrush through, coax the Pokie in to the bag, then pinch it off and place the bag over the opening of the new enclosure and reverse the whole process. Only thing to watch out for is that most Ts can bite through the bag, so just err on the side of caution there.

EDIT: I misspoke in the first part. The side-to-side method isn't incorrect, it's just too risky for me personally. I think if you have a wide open area to do it in and enough experience, it's perfectly viable!
 
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Ceymann

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Jul 3, 2016
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Actually side by side transfers, if the T will cooperate, are the best transfers, they are less stressful to the T and while the probability of it bolting is higher, the chances of you getting bit are less, than say, catch cupping out of old setup, then getting it out of the cup and into a new enclosure. That's alot of close contact and a fast T can turn around in a catch cup and be fang deep in you in the blink of an eye.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
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Apr 8, 2016
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Then open up the lid and push back out with soft paintbrush.
 

Matabuey

Arachnosquire
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Aug 9, 2016
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I don't think I've seen a single rehousing video of an OW on YouTube that was done "correctly." It's almost always something similar to what you described. I use the bag method to deal with my P. metallica: place a plastic bag over the opening of the enclosure, poke a paintbrush through, coax the Pokie in to the bag, then pinch it off and place the bag over the opening of the new enclosure and reverse the whole process. Only thing to watch out for is that most Ts can bite through the bag, so just err on the side of caution there.
Never seen a video of someone doing this though, seems odd to imagine.
 

Ceymann

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Jul 3, 2016
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124
Never seen a video of someone doing this though, seems odd to imagine.
I have seen the bag method done. Its too much if you ask me, I not trash talking people who use it, but it seems this method is done out of fear of escape and potential bites. Again, not trash talking but I feel if you need to use the bag method, you obviously are not comfortable with dealing with fast, defensive Ts and if you cant keep your cool if one bolts on you, then you are going to eventually have a bad time if you keep fast, defensive OW Ts.
90% of successfully dealing with OW Ts when it comes to rehousing/escapees is being able to remain calm, if a T bolts on you and you are making frantic movements, scrambling for your catch cup, panic etc etc. All your frantic movements are scaring the T even more, the ability to keep your cool, clearly think of a plan/think before you act is worth its weight in gold when transferring and dealing with fast, defensive Ts. When you panic, you make bad decisions, bad decisions end with bad results and bad results mean either a dead or injured T or you sustaining a nasty bite, possible lost T , dead T or a combination of all the negative results.
A cool head is everything when dealing with venomous/dangerous animals.
 

Haksilence

Bad At Titles
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Dec 6, 2015
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405
i utilize the bag method for some of my more defensive species. most get the side by side transfer or go into a bottle or catch cup then placed in the new enclosure.
 

14pokies

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 25, 2014
Messages
1,706
I have seen the bag method done. Its too much if you ask me, I not trash talking people who use it, but it seems this method is done out of fear of escape and potential bites. Again, not trash talking but I feel if you need to use the bag method, you obviously are not comfortable with dealing with fast, defensive Ts and if you cant keep your cool if one bolts on you, then you are going to eventually have a bad time if you keep fast, defensive OW Ts.
90% of successfully dealing with OW Ts when it comes to rehousing/escapees is being able to remain calm, if a T bolts on you and you are making frantic movements, scrambling for your catch cup, panic etc etc. All your frantic movements are scaring the T even more, the ability to keep your cool, clearly think of a plan/think before you act is worth its weight in gold when transferring and dealing with fast, defensive Ts. When you panic, you make bad decisions, bad decisions end with bad results and bad results mean either a dead or injured T or you sustaining a nasty bite, possible lost T , dead T or a combination of all the negative results.
A cool head is everything when dealing with venomous/dangerous animals.
When I first heard of the bag method I thought it was a joke.. IMO it's way over complicated and I can't imagine a newer possibly scared keeper staying calm as he/she is watching a psychotic Tarantula repeatedly slapping at and sinking it's fangs through the flimsy bag!
 

BobBarley

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Sep 16, 2015
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Another thing I've heard (haven't had to rehouse a fiesty OW before) is that a large piece of say, cardboard surprises the t less than say a prod from a paint brush, and the t is more cooperative. I think I read that from @z32upgrader 's comment on a rehouse video.
 

Abyss

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
281
Just be calm and patient and gentle. Not at all saying it cant or wont happen but i have never really had a T bolt. I have had them not cooperate an try an go in directions i dont want them to go but when i was learning i used a soft tipped paintbrush an now i just use the rubber tipped to gs to gently guide the T where i want.

If its terestrial, i guide it to an open spot and use a catch cup (generally tubberware) an guide it inside then slip the lid on (revesrse the process in the new enclosure).

If its arboreal, i use a long piece of cork. Use the same process except guide it onto the cork. Then down the cork (or up depending where it wants to go) and rite into the new enclosure.

Easy peasy :)
 

Venom1080

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Sep 24, 2015
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I have seen the bag method done. Its too much if you ask me, I not trash talking people who use it, but it seems this method is done out of fear of escape and potential bites.
um, yes? i dont want fast OWs escaping into my room, the bag method seems perfect. i know i wont flip if a OW runs on me, but id rather avoid that situation entirely. taking a couple minutes to do is far better than chasing a OW around my room for 20 minutes or getting bit. over complicated? i dont think so. please note, ive never done the bag method, but from what ive seen, it looks perfect for rehousing my psycho OW.
 

Andy00

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Feb 4, 2016
Messages
154
Another thing I've heard (haven't had to rehouse a fiesty OW before) is that a large piece of say, cardboard surprises the t less than say a prod from a paint brush, and the t is more cooperative. I think I read that from @z32upgrader 's comment on a rehouse video.
Yeah I've used this method for my T's that always seem hungry and turn around and bite everything. It works great because they USUALLY immediately feel intimidated and won't bite. then I just coax them into a catch cup or into their next enclosure. This is much easier with terrestrials though.
 
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