Recomendations?

LD50

Arachnosquire
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Nov 13, 2002
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102
Hapalopus Sp. Colombia Large
Pretty neat little tarantula that grows fast.
 

Matt Man

Arachnoprince
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I have 2 GBBs, neither kick hair so add me to the list.
Get an OBT, fills all the reqs, and is prettier than Ceratogyrus
and you already keep Centipedes
 

Smotzer

Arachnoking
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find it a touch confusing that people think C. cyaneopubescens are an amazing beginner species but N. incei/D. diamantinensis somehow aren't suitable, thet literally do everything a C. cyaneopubescens does except kick hairs.
My C. cyaneopubenscens is extremely laid back. I didnt mean that C. cyaneopubescens is an amazing beginner, there are better, and that N. incei is completely unsuitable, bacuase they are suitable, all I said was that they are fast for true beginners, but I said it is a decent choice. IME My N. incei's are extremely fast, and bolty is all. I did not mean to imply I fervently disavowed N. incei as a recommendation for the OP or that they arent amazing or cant work for beginners, because I dont feel that way.

I think yours is broken because they're notorious hair kickers.
Maybe it is!! LOL. I have literally never seen mine flick a single hair and its abdomen never shows signs of it either, and not even at me when I have to get in its way and destroy webbing to do maintenance or clean out water bowls, no hair kicking. Maybe I'm just lucky, and maybe I dont think of them as such with others that are worse. Who knows mine is the least defensive one I may own.
 

TooManyCooks

Arachnopeon
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Feb 8, 2021
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After reading it all, I’d like to recommend not to keep one.
Appreciate the honesty! I'd rather not have a tarantula at all, instead of a tarantula i wasn't 100% confident i could provide the best care for, so it's oddly reassuring that someone with experience recommended that keeping a T may not be the thing for me.
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
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Huge difference from keeping Scolopendra to a OW or even NW tarantula. Pedes can't climb smooth surfaces so are a piece of cake to rehouse, cage maintenance etcetera if you enclosure is tall.
 

TooManyCooks

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
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That limits you to old worlds and Psalmopeous/Tapinauchenius. Neither of those options are generally a good beginner species.

If you weren't so set against NW species I'd say get a GBB. It checks off all your boxes except for the urticating hairs. Hair kicking will only happen when you're disturbing them (rehousing mostly), so I wouldn't write off half the species just because they can kick hair.
I personally don't care about hair-kicking, it's skin-sensitive housemates i'm concerned over... and a dumbass dog that licks everything, but thats offtopic. Hadn't considered GBB, so i'll look into them!

I cant find fault in this. They beat C. Darlingi in the spicy area.
Definitely looked into these, but I don't know how inclined they are to escape their enclosures.
 

Matt Man

Arachnoprince
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Definitely looked into these, but I don't know how inclined they are to escape their enclosures.
Not likely. They don't climb much, they prefer to head down, as does their cousin the c marshalli. Mostly pet holes, underfeeding them keeps them near the mouths of their burrows. Give them lots of depth to dig and they will use it. Rehousing fossorials can be an issue so if you can find an adult in an enclosure, all the better.
 

BoyFromLA

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Appreciate the honesty! I'd rather not have a tarantula at all, instead of a tarantula i wasn't 100% confident i could provide the best care for, so it's oddly reassuring that someone with experience recommended that keeping a T may not be the thing for me.
Unlike in the wild, live animals in captive are solely dependent on you, and you alone.

It is always wise to think of worst case scenario that could be happened into consideration. It’s because the more requirements you have, the more riskier to you, and your animals.

-Something shy or rarely seen works just fine. The less visible to arachnophobic housemates, the better.
-Something food aggressive, i'd like a reliable eater that won't turn down food before i leave for a week's time.
-Old or new world doesn't matter
-The only requirement that is an absolute must is that it can't kick hairs. Urdicating hairs and strong venom are O.K, but absolutely NO hair kicking!
You may be ok with said above requirements when something happens, but your roommate may not at all, and that is something you cannot think lightly.

Thus, I came up with my previous answer.
 

TooManyCooks

Arachnopeon
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Update: Decided not to get a tarantula. They're supposed to be super easy (as compared to other pets), but i don't feel like i know enough about them, nor have the experience, to feel comfortable caring for one. I think centipedes are my thing.
Thanks everybody for the help though!
 

Matt Man

Arachnoprince
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Update: Decided not to get a tarantula. They're supposed to be super easy (as compared to other pets), but i don't feel like i know enough about them, nor have the experience, to feel comfortable caring for one. I think centipedes are my thing.
Thanks everybody for the help though!
I applaud your consideration and decision making. I wish more people thought deeply and asked questions before buying.
I will concur there are many, many Ts that are way, way easier than Scolopendra dehaani
 
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