Re: Rhopalurus & Tityus

ORION_DV8

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 3, 2003
Messages
331
Hello All,
First time posting here i have a quick question can anyone tell me any readily identifiable traits to distinguish Rhopalurus junceus from Tityus serrulatus also any other info on either of these species would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Orion
 

XOskeletonRED

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 6, 2003
Messages
707
Tityus serrulatus: Brazilian scorpion which male to female ratio has been discovered to be extremely low. In colonies, only a small number of males (in comparison to the number of females) have been discovered and females have been discovered to have been gravid without ever having bred with a male (this is also a trait found to exist in Hottentotta hottentotta and a small number of other scorpion species). It's a very difficult species to get out of Brazil, though occasionally it has been seen, but the Brazilian laws on exporting scorpions native to the country prevents them from being shipped directly to the US and it's surroundings. Believe me, I have tried on numerous occasions. Like Skinheaddave said, the Tityus scorpion, serrulatus, has a subaculear spine next to the sting. If you find any for sale, give me a holla! Nearing five to six years or a little over, is a long time to be searching for them with no success, other than other people getting their hands on them and all of them dying with no reproduction having been recorded in captivity. Same goes for T. stigmurus and T. bahiensis, which are also naive to Brazil. As a note, it is said that T. stigmurus was thought to have been a color morph or subspecies of T. serrulatus. There has not been a very large amount of scientific studies done on these scorpions, though I believe the conclusion stated that they were, indeed, different species. More information is hopefully obtainable and I am currently awaiting a response to an inquiry I sent to a gentleman in the wildlife reserve who happens to be in Brazil at the current time. Perhaps his findings will better my own and give myself more hope of getting some of the species native to Brazil.


adios,
edw. :D
 

ORION_DV8

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 3, 2003
Messages
331
As far as I know they are also native to Venezuela, which is where i may be getting my hands on a pair of them. What exact species stands to be seen upon receipt but for now i have my fingers crossed. Any info on longevity? are both species rare in the trade? once again THanks
Orion
 

XOskeletonRED

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 6, 2003
Messages
707
From what I have been able to gather from my findings, everything from the area is relatively difficult to aqcuire (and is not often found in the hobby), though yes, as you stated, other countries which they venture into, can ship them (occasionally, I find people who keep them in locales around Brazil which have, themselves, ventured into the area to collect them). It is rare and at a descently high cost for most exportation from the areas. Life span, according to keepers of the genus Tityus and species from the area (they live in the area), it is a relatively short lived scorpion and lives to around 3-4 years, on average.



adios,
edw. :D
 

Jacobo

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 19, 2005
Messages
18
question

hey .. i need know about the laws to export scorpions... i'm living in colombia, actually i has a lot of tityus and centruroides to sell... but i don't know how to export them...

plz tell me something about it..

thanks

jacobo
 

Murziukas

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 4, 2005
Messages
452
Most efective way of export IMHO is to pack it, declare it as scientific material of value 0 EURO/USD/whatever and send it by airmail. :rolleyes:
It's forbiden to send live animals by post in Lithuania, but no one gives a crap about it. ;)

Jacobo said:
hey .. i need know about the laws to export scorpions... i'm living in colombia, actually i has a lot of tityus and centruroides to sell... but i don't know how to export them...

plz tell me something about it..

thanks

jacobo
 

Gsc

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2004
Messages
538
XOskeletonRED said:
Nearing five to six years or a little over, is a long time to be searching for them with no success, other than other people getting their hands on them and all of them dying with no reproduction having been recorded in captivity.

Hey XOskeletonRED, I live in Texas and have 4 species of Tityus. Two litters of T. bahiensis in the last week.... I have a Tityus serrulatus that should be dropping in the next month or so.

A small handful of us americans do have them and are working with them...
 

ORION_DV8

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 3, 2003
Messages
331
Hey GSC any chance on getting rid of a couple of T. serrulatus?
let me know, and as for exportation from colombia, well i think it is hard but hey try sending by mail, ill receive if you are sending. Other than trying to mail em i would suggest going to the Ministerio de Agricultura y Recursos Naturales and applying for a permit.
cheers
ORION
 
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