Rd Slate Ornamental (P.rufilata)

Tarantula Lover

Psalmopoeus Lover
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Jul 21, 2002
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I am interested in this T, and would like to purchase a sling at 1", do you guys think that is a bad choice? I already have a speedy chevron, and have expeirience with speedsters and aggressive t's, any input? Thanks,

James
 

shmidti

Arachnopeon
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Dec 14, 2002
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P.Rufilata

Exellent choice James! Poecilatheria Rufilata is the largest arboreal tarantula in the hobby (up to 10" plus)
From my experience as they become adults they are pretty laid back. They will find themselves a comfortable spot and usually web themselves in coming out at night. Beautiful specimens they are, a must have in this hobby. If you live in the states and want to purchase a captive born rufilata contact Todd Gearheart at

sales@tarantulaspiders.com
he successfully produced a sac in the U.S. a couple of months ago.
Exellent bloodline, Female over 9" Male 8"

Tell him shmidti sent you.
 

conipto

ArachnoPrincess
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Sep 27, 2002
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I don't have one, but the one thing I've heard consistently is that they like it a bit drier than the other pokes do. Might be worthless trash, but something worth looking into. Also, don't be surprised to pay a good amount for one.

Bill
 

Tarantula Lover

Psalmopoeus Lover
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hey

i decided that i am going to buy one from kelly swift for $40! along with 1 suntiger, 1 peruvian pinktoe, 1 tigerrump, and a few culyhairs! Thanks,

James
 

Devildoll

Arachnoknight
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Jul 19, 2002
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i thought they were about the same size as P. ornata? do they actually get bigger? cause P. ornata gets to around 10" too.
 

Weapon-X

Arachnodemon
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re

awesome choice james!, i have a 2'' p. rufilata right now and it seems to be very shy, hides a lot in the day and comes out at night i have its setup a little drier than my other pokies i use a small cap of water to help with humidity and i mist every 3 days(lightly), thats great that your getting a suntiger i've been wanting those for a while now i'll get around to ordering dome soon, devildoll yeah i have heard before that p. rufilata is the largest with p. ornata following it, John LaRizzo had some pretty awesome pics up showing their size maybe he'll post some here, either way i love my 3 new p. ornatas and my p. rufilata all the same. i guess i'll find out how big they get when they grow up, by the way i have noticed also that the p. formosa's i got are really really shy and lightning fast,best regards--Jeff
 

petitegreeneyes

Arachnoprince
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Sep 26, 2002
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Hi Devildoll and yes they do get that big. I have one and she is now at 5" and very pretty. They are skittish acting and not all evil like people may think.

Hi James, You will also love the suntigers, they have incredible markings and are quite fast little guys:D
 

jwb121377

Arachnoangel
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Aug 20, 2002
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Re: hey

Originally posted by Tarantula Lover
i decided that i am going to buy one from kelly swift for $40! along with 1 suntiger, 1 peruvian pinktoe, 1 tigerrump, and a few culyhairs! Thanks,

James
Wow James at this rate your going to pass my collection lol.
 

Henry Kane

Arachnoprince
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Jul 19, 2002
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1,885
Hey James. Good choices on you new batch of T's. May I suggest you read Darrin's pokie bite report in the thread entitled "Hot"?
Other than that, best of luck with the new bugs. :)

Atrax
 

Brandon

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Jul 19, 2002
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I just got 6 Poecilatheria Rufilata they are defentally worth it, and as Atrax said be forwarned of there venom, its quite stronge.

Sincerely,

Brandon
 

shmidti

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
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Devildoll
Rufilata is the largest arboreal tarantula in the hobby
Ornata gets to 10"
Rufilata can reach 11"
I once seen an 8 year old rufy......impressive.

And yes beware of any poecilatheria's venom.......could potentially kill you if you are not in the best of health!!!
 

Gail

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Aug 16, 2002
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Hi James, I got a Redslate from Kelly a while back and I can tell you that it does like it a bit dryer than most slings - in fact, all I do is keep a capfull of water available for it (I have seen it drinking several times) and I mist lightly every few days. It has shed several times without incident and is about 2.5" now. It is a very nervous spider and very fast, but so far hasn't shown any aggression when I clean it's cage. I am very careful with it though, as the venom is reputed to be quite strong. Hope this helps.

Gail
 

LaRiz

Arachnodemon
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Aug 7, 2002
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Not to discount what anybody has said; I've kept P. rufilata for years and I think this may be the first time I've heard that they should be kept drier than others within the genera. Though, that doesn't really say much.
I've also done some research on P. rufilata and from what I've gathered, the places where they were captured just doesn't sound dry. Some were captured in a region in India called Ponmudi. Ponmudi's elevation is around 2000 ft. above sea level. I've also read that they are only found at elevations 2700 to 4300 ft above sea level, making them a montane species. These mountains are in the midst of rain forests. Humid and cool.
Some collection locales include Peppara Wildlife sanctuary. Other animals found in these forests include Tigers, macaques, elephants, and leopards.
Peppara's average summer temps. are 95 F, and winter being around 60 F. Annual rainfall averages at 118.11 inches. That's alot of rain!
Topography is montane and hilly from 328 ft. to 5633 ft. above sea level.
This info may be a tad anal, but I hope it helps formulate an opinion as to how you may better your P. rufilata's captive environment.
john
 

Gail

Arachnopixie
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Originally posted by LaRiz
Not to discount what anybody has said; I've kept P. rufilata for years and I think this may be the first time I've heard that they should be kept drier than others within the genera. Though, that doesn't really say much.
I've also done some research on P. rufilata and from what I've gathered, the places where they were captured just doesn't sound dry. Some were captured in a region in India called Ponmudi. Ponmudi's elevation is around 2000 ft. above sea level. I've also read that they are only found at elevations 2700 to 4300 ft above sea level, making them a montane species. These mountains are in the midst of rain forests. Humid and cool.
Some collection locales include Peppara Wildlife sanctuary. Other animals found in these forests include Tigers, macaques, elephants, and leopards.
Peppara's average summer temps. are 95 F, and winter being around 60 F. Annual rainfall averages at 118.11 inches. That's alot of rain!
Topography is montane and hilly from 328 ft. to 5633 ft. above sea level.
This info may be a tad anal, but I hope it helps formulate an opinion as to how you may better your P. rufilata's captive environment.
john
Thanks for the info John, I wasn't aware that they lived in such humid areas of India. For what it's worth though, mine really does seem to hate it when it's humid. It avoids any misted areas, if I mist it's tube web it will abandone it until it dries. Once, when I accidentally way over-filled it's water and the substrate got wet enough to raise the humidity up it hung out next to the venelation holes until the substrate dried up. I'm not arguing that they don't live in humid conditions in the wild, I'm just pointing out that perhaps the one I have is a freak :)

Gail
 

LaRiz

Arachnodemon
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Aug 7, 2002
Messages
672
Gail,
Probably not a freak, perhaps this is how they behave, naturally. It's probably not too damp within a dead tree hollow, but the relative humidity may be high. And tarantulas in general will probably escape rainy condtions in a natural setting.
They may have a pretty tiny brain, with only a few "thoughts" in there that tell 'em what to do, but I believe they do show individuality and preference.
 
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