Raising Theraphosa slings

Fran

Arachnoprince
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Talking today with Lonnie, (AphonopelmaTX) about those little "tricks" to successfully raise slings of the Theraphosa genus, I thought of making a thread sharing those tricks.


During the last years,(when I actually focused on the Theraphosa genus), sometimes little problems arise when raising 2nd instars of this genus.

These, specially Theraphosa blondi were specially delicate to make the first 2-3 molts. I bought a big number last year (1st recent Europe Import in quite some time) and this year (Jan 2011 ) and 4 of them died on me for no apparent reason.

Also, with Theraphosa apophysis when they are 2nd and 3rd instar,the legs are so long that molts are a bit more crucial.
I have had to step in several times to sort of get the old exuvia off of them because their metatarsi and tarsi were deforming by the old exuvia weight.


Besides that, when they are around 4" and above, everything gets really easier.

The main things to take into consideration to really succeed at raising Theraphosa are:

-Smaller container housing
-Very damp conditions
-And regular daily cleaning and after each meal.


Smaller container housing

These slings,specially apophysis , gets ridiculously stressed with anything moving around their enclosure when they are under
5-6".
I realized that smaller containers and very little disturbance gets them to be calmer, feed more regularly and avoids climbing.
I house 2nd instars in around 4" by 4" plastic enclosures, and literally upgrade them little by little.

On cleaning and humidity matters
Because of the warmer temps that you need to provide in order for them to speed up the fragile sling state, dehydration will ocurr extremely easily.

You need to provide literally very damp conditions inside the containers, and of curse a small cap as an open water source.

They can surprise you with a molt at ANY time, so better safe than sorry.


Due to this very wet conditions, I have seen within a matter of hours MAGGOTS around the tiny little bolus after a meal, and around the water dish...and they quickly spread.

Water cleaning MUST be an every day deal with them. They are so susceptible of getting fungus and maggots on their enclosure that those cleanings must be a daily thing.
Once they are around 4-5" You can relax a little bit and keep the enclosure a little bit less damp.


So yes, when they are slings they are definitely a harder task. Specially when I keep them at 85-87F to trigger a bit of a faster metabolism so they get out of that fragile stage.

But thats what T keeping is all about, the observation and interaction when needed :).
So go ahead and get your Theraphosa !!!
 
Last edited:

Bosing

Arachnoangel
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Thanks for the share sir! Will keep these information in tact. Very handy. :clap::clap::clap:
 

Protectyaaaneck

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Just out of curiousity, why are there maggots in their enclosures? Do you feed flies to your t's?
 

Fran

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No, They appear from the dead crickets or bolus if you dont remove it with a couple of hours. I have also sen mites and tiny phorid flies.
 

Protectyaaaneck

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No, They appear from the dead crickets or bolus if you dont remove it with a couple of hours. I have also sen mites and tiny phorid flies.
I've seen mites and phorid flies but never maggots. That's a first for me.
 

Rue

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Very timely for me! I'm reading everything I can...and best to get direct info. from those with experience! Thanks!
 

AgentD006las

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Great write up Fran. I kept my Theraphosa strimi sling this way and had good success. Maybe a little different than T. blondi but I think the high temps and humidity helped alot. I kept my T. stirmi sling at 85 deg with water condensating on the walls. It was very humid to say the least. :razz:
 

Fran

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I guess thats not for me to decide :), but thanks everyone.

Hopefully we get more imput from other members aswell!
 

billopelma

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How much does the mortality rate go up when they are kept at lower temps and/or less humid? I don't mean extremes, say 72 degrees F and wet side/dry side enclosure...


Bill
 

AphonopelmaTX

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I'll agree with this being a sticky as long as my name is removed from the first line. ;)
 

pato_chacoana

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I've seen mites and phorid flies but never maggots. That's a first for me.
Jason, the maggots turn into flies.

Good post Fran, always good to throw experiences on these delicate species. I hope to contribute something later on.

Cheers,
Pato
 

kevin88

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yup the maggots turn into the phorid flies. Any leftover food in moist conditions will cause them to go for it and reproduce. Cleanliness is the only way to fight them really.

Kevin
 

Fran

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How much does the mortality rate go up when they are kept at lower temps and/or less humid? I don't mean extremes, say 72 degrees F and wet side/dry side enclosure...


Bill
Actually, althought this probably doesnt mean much in scientific terms since the number for a reliable experiment should be way higher, 2 of the 4 deaths were kept outside of the mid 80's setup. (at low to mid 70's ).

The only difference I have experience with lower temps is that they feed less, and grow slower. But of course they had the same type of humidity...
So again, Im not sure what would be the real impact on keeping them on the low 70's from 2nd instars on.
 

Bosing

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Well, I for one have observed that these maggots just somehow magically appear whenever there are decaying matter and most especially so in a moist environment.

Its as if they were airborne... :?{D
 
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