Question on my B vagan

tweetygt

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 22, 2007
Messages
28
I am sure someone else has asked this. But My B.Vagan molted a few weeks ago. Well for the last 2 weeks she has been eating like crazy. Atleast 2 crickets aday. Is this normal after a molt?
 

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 28, 2007
Messages
1,670
I am sure someone else has asked this. But My B.Vagan molted a few weeks ago. Well for the last 2 weeks she has been eating like crazy. Atleast 2 crickets aday. Is this normal after a molt?
Yes, this is normal because the longer a tarantula is in pre -molt it may stop eating for a long time then it will molt.

After it molts it grows new fangs but it won't eat because its fangs have to harden first which depending on the tarantula's new size it could be 4 days or it could be four weeks. the longer it has to wait for the fangs to harden the longer it will go without food but still be hungry.

once they harden its ready to eat a lot....if I was you I'd give it 5-6 crickets all at once so it can eat its full and what it doesnt eat you can take it out...thats how i do it.
 

tweetygt

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 22, 2007
Messages
28
Yes, this is normal because the longer a tarantula is in pre -molt it may stop eating for a long time then it will molt.

After it molts it grows new fangs but it won't eat because its fangs have to harden first which depending on the tarantula's new size it could be 4 days or it could be four weeks. the longer it has to wait for the fangs to harden the longer it will go without food but still be hungry.

once they harden its ready to eat a lot....if I was you I'd give it 5-6 crickets all at once so it can eat its full and what it doesnt eat you can take it out...thats how i do it.
Oh ok thanks. I was a little shocked at how much she was eating, but that makes sense. I did not want to over feed her.
 

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 28, 2007
Messages
1,670
Oh ok thanks. I was a little shocked at how much she was eating, but that makes sense. I did not want to over feed her.
You can't overfeed a tarantula. it will only eat until it feels full. once you feed it as much as its going to eat (the day you feed it) wait until a week later and feed it again. if you feed yours as much as i do by third week of the month it should be back in pre molt - unless you have a rose hair..those are usually always in pre - molt or just randomly eat.
 

tweetygt

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 22, 2007
Messages
28
You can't overfeed a tarantula. it will only eat until it feels full. once you feed it as much as its going to eat (the day you feed it) wait until a week later and feed it again. if you feed yours as much as i do by third week of the month it should be back in pre molt - unless you have a rose hair..those are usually always in pre - molt or just randomly eat.
OH Great if she does that then I might need to move her to another tank before I know it :eek:
 

Nitibus

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 7, 2007
Messages
728
You can't overfeed a tarantula. it will only eat until it feels full. once you feed it as much as its going to eat (the day you feed it) wait until a week later and feed it again. if you feed yours as much as i do by third week of the month it should be back in pre molt - unless you have a rose hair..those are usually always in pre - molt or just randomly eat.
This is a much debated concept. Some have suggested that over feeding can happen, and that it can lead to moulting problems. The conclusion being that the abdomen of the T gets too large for proper movement, and as it drags it around, scarring forms on the underbelly. The scarring prevents a proper moult later. Keep this in mind ! Make sure that you NEVER feed to the point that the T can not keep it's belly off the substrate !
 

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 28, 2007
Messages
1,670
This is a much debated concept. Some have suggested that over feeding can happen, and that it can lead to moulting problems. The conclusion being that the abdomen of the T gets too large for proper movement, and as it drags it around, scarring forms on the underbelly. The scarring prevents a proper moult later. Keep this in mind ! Make sure that you NEVER feed to the point that the T can not keep it's belly off the substrate !
Niti, just a question, have you ever seen this actually happen? I typed this in a post before (exactly what you're responding to) they said it could lead to "abdomen dragging". i never seen a picture of this on this site nor have i seen a video on places like youtube of a tarantula dragging its abdomen. So until I get real proof (pictures of an overside abdomen, a video of some sort etc) that this can actually happen I will keep feeding my Tarantulas this way.

I have had my Tarantules for at least a year and half and have always feed them this way with NO ill effects. So why try to fix something if its not broken, you know? and if they never over feed their self in the wild ( I'm sure from time to time some species get lucky and get like a pile of rodent babies or just a lot of insects in one place if they were to ever wander) then I really doubt it will happen in capivity. Also it was never talked about happening in the schultz book or on any animal planet show. If it does let me know the exact information thanks. :worship:
 

Damien

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 18, 2004
Messages
62
I read an advice on this forum once about feeding after a moult, which was to drip some water near the tarantula. If it pounces on the drop of water, it is ready to eat again. I have started doing this even after they have started eating regularly (largely because crickets making noise at night drive me to insanity), just to see if they are hungry. If they are not they tend not to pounce, and so I do not give them any food. This seems to keeps them well-fed and stops me from going insane from cricket chirping as well, so we are all happy.
 
Top