Question on injuries

vbrooke

Arachnobaron
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Hey there everyone! I'm new to this Tarantula world and have a question. My husband was holding our new Tarantula (she just wandered into our kitchen), and she jumped off of his elbow. She seemed fine except for a little oozing from her knee. Now a few days later she seems depressed and inactive. She is also ready to molt at any time. Should we be concerned?
 

Aurelia

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for small injuries it's ok to use New Skin (liquid bandage) or corn starch to clot up the hemolymph (blood). since you didn't do that while it was bleed it stopped on its own.

I'd just keep an eye on her and not handle her until after she molts and hardens up again. Handling her right now is too stressful and it might end up in a bad molt which could easily kill her.
 

vbrooke

Arachnobaron
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Thanks for the info. I regret that I didn't know about new skin sooner. We have left her alone, and are just making sure that she has water. I hope that she'll be ok, she's very dosile.
 

Aurelia

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a couple of questions-
how big is she?
what species?
do you know how much hemolymph she lost?

I'm no expert but I think she'll be ok, as long as she's not sitting in her death curl. I think Ts usually slow down when they're in premolt, polar opposite right after they molt. Their exoskeleton is really soft and they have to protect themselves, etc. Also, an inactive T is a happy T. :)
 

Texas Blonde

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If it lost blood, make sure it has a nice open water dish available in case it needs to rehydrate. Keep and eye on it, but dont disturb it. Also, if the leg is badly damaged, the spider might autotomize the limb. Dont be scared if this happens. The spider knows whats best for itself.
 

Drachenjager

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how far did it fall and are you sure its a she? also what species.
If it fell far enough to damage a leg, i would be more concerned about internal damage. a fall of a foot can cause internal damage if it has a large abdomen and hard surface it lands on.
 

jen650s

Arachnobaron
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Do you have any pictures? Don't disturb her to get them, but it usually helps to see what someone is talking about.
 

vbrooke

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Sorry I stepped away for a few hours. The day after we found the T in our kitchen we took it to the nearest pet store. The owner said that it was a young female mexican grey. We have looked and looked for info on Mexican Grey's and have had no luck so we are going on instinct of the other T's in our rural area of Campo, CA. The fall was about 2-3 feet but into soft muddy dirt. She acted normal for a period and then took a stance with all of her legs close to her body and kinda high. I'm not sure if that is a bad sign or not. At the time we took her to the pet store, he told us she was ready to molt soon so I don't know which is the reason for her behavior.:confused:
 

kimski

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How's the patient doing? I noticed you said she's 'curled' - is she upside down or right side up?
 

vbrooke

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She seems about the same. She is right side up but not moving. I did some more reading this am and I'm trying the ICU treatment. I quess we'll see.
 

Stan Schultz

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... so we are going on instinct of the other T's in our rural area of Campo, CA. ...
So this is a wild tarantula, native to your area? If so it definitely isn't anything that can be called a Mexican gray! In fact, I've never heard of any tarantula called that. If anyone knows differently, please educate me!

... She acted normal for a period ...
Are you sure it's a "she?" Do you know how to tell the difference?

... At the time we took her to the pet store, he told us she was ready to molt soon ...
Highly unlikely. It's the wrong time of the year. While a few of our native tarantulas will molt anytime in the year after a rainstorm, most molt in early to mid spring.

In one of your posts you mention keeping it in an ICU. That's about the best you can do at the moment.

Best of luck.
 

vbrooke

Arachnobaron
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:( I'm sorry to say that I believe Tera the T must be dying. She is now in her ICU for the second day and is starting to leak blood from joints that were fine yesterday. If anyone has info on how long a T can take to die vs getting better plz let me know. I don't want her to suffer if in fact she is dying.
 

MizM

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Be careful, the taxonomy of California Ts is way off. Although they are correct that we only have Aphonopelma here.

Females of our local species are few and far between, staying burrowed and rarely coming near human habitation. The males are entirely the opposite though, they have been reported wandering in huge "herds" and often show up in or near homes.

Best of luck. If it is, in fact, a male, you should re-release him near where he was found. A male in captivity will only wander his enclosure until he dies a lonely death. :(

I did a search on trantulas in california and came up with this:
http://nature.berkeley.edu/~stevelew/cbcstuff/common_spiders/big_spi_quilt.html

It lists other spiders as well but has a pic of a T right away.

Is it possible that this was a wondering male? If so - he may have been near death anyway.
 

jen650s

Arachnobaron
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In answer to what it is, as far as I know all of our natives here in San Diego are Aphonopelma spp.

As to how long it can take to die-quite a while. If you are convinced that it is dying put it in the fridge for a couple of hours and then in the freezer to kill it. Since our natives can withstand periods of freezing I'd be sure to leave it in for at least a few days.
 

MizM

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I'm betting A. steindachneri or A. eutylenum. But I wouldn't bet my paycheck on it!! ;)
In answer to what it is, as far as I know all of our natives here in San Diego are Aphonopelma spp.

As to how long it can take to die-quite a while. If you are convinced that it is dying put it in the fridge for a couple of hours and then in the freezer to kill it. Since our natives can withstand periods of freezing I'd be sure to leave it in for at least a few days.
 

vbrooke

Arachnobaron
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I did a search on trantulas in california and came up with this:
http://nature.berkeley.edu/~stevelew/cbcstuff/common_spiders/big_spi_quilt.html

It lists other spiders as well but has a pic of a T right away.

Is it possible that this was a wondering male? If so - he may have been near death anyway.
Hey, I think you have discovered what kind of T we have(had). It looks exactly like the first one. Do you know the common name for the Aphonopelma spp.? I quess they are al over out here. We live in the high desert and have all sorts of different creatures.:?
 

MizM

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If you want a definite identification, call Tom Prentice at UC Riverside entymology. He can tell you how to get a photograph to him, or, he will describe, at length, what you are looking for. It might be a long call, he will describe each segment of the legs, etc. etc. He's a great guy though and is glad to help.

Hey, I think you have discovered what kind of T we have(had). It looks exactly like the first one. Do you know the common name for the Aphonopelma spp.? I quess they are al over out here. We live in the high desert and have all sorts of different creatures.:?
 
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