Question: heat necessities for Ts

Lara

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Nov 18, 2016
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Hi! I've been researching Ts for over a year and do not have any yet, but my wish list is growing. I think I'm most concerned about keeping the enclosure warm enough. In reading all the things and watching lots of YouTube videos I've seen that Ts are mostly hardy when you consider how long they've been around. I live in OK and I've seen native Ts here on camping trips, so I know that breed has got be able to survive a zone 7, but I'm looking for something else.

I know this question is breed-specific, but I'm trying to figure out if I can make these Ts work with the current layout of my home. I don't have an extra room to dedicate and heat above the house temp, which averages between 65F in the winter and up to 85F in the summer (but it's usually around 70-80F).

If I'm looking to start with a B. Smithi or a Euthalus sp. red (or both if I can trick my husband) do you think I need to provide external heat to one side of the enclosure? If so, if I have both enclosures next to each other, could I get away with one bulb between them so they could still retreat to the other side if it gets too warm?

Also, how do you address fire safety when you offer external heat?

Thanks so much!
 

tarantulashack

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Jan 20, 2015
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I keep my house at 70 degrees during the winter and have yet had a problem with that. If you were to choose an external heat source though I personally would do a small space heater or a heating pad attached to the side not the bottom so your new tarantula isn't roasted alive. I would not suggest a heat bulb for many reasons its just not needed and will cause alot of stress. All in all you will most likely b fine with room temp as long as its not dropping below 65. a b. Smithi would be an awesome first tarantula welcome to the hobby and prepare yourself and husband to own many tarantulas :p
 

Trenor

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Temperatures of 70-80 with a short periods at 65 shouldn't be a problem for most tarantula species. If it stays down at 65 or gets below that I would recommend a space heater to off set the temps in the room with the Ts. The problems with heat bulbs and pads is tarantulas will shift towards the heat and if the pad or lamp is close to the enclosure it can cause problems for the Ts.
 

Lara

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Nov 18, 2016
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Thanks, Trenor. I knew heating pads were bad- good to know the bulbs aren't safe either.
 

Chris LXXIX

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IMO the bulbs, and lights as heating of all sorts are a no way, by far worst than heat pads.

I keep (and always kept) my inverts in Winter time at Day 23/24° C
Night (drop on purpose) 20° C

basically I use my furnace only, but I know other people here in Italy (the Northern part is pretty cold in Winter if compared to the Southern one) that used/use heat pads and heating cables and nothing (as far as I know) of particular concern happened to their T's. In all honesty I don't suggest those unless really a space heater is out of the question and there's really too cold.

In the UK, another example, it's not rare at all to have keepers using those.

Anyway, like Trenor said. And let's consider one thing, also: the juve/adults of the Theraphosidae you mentioned are however pretty strong on that sense, while slings (no matter which) always a bit more delicate.
 

Trenor

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As far as species goes - I have two B.smithi females and they are a great tarantula species to start out with IMO. I've really enjoyed keeping them thus far.

Let us know when you get your Ts and we'll be glad to help get you started off right. :)
 

cold blood

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Any of the slower growing species would be just fine and dandy at those temps without any added heating.

That said, if you buy slings, its a different story. I don't like to let slings get below 70, with closer to 80 being preferable. Although for a sling or a few, you could easily set up a heat bath with a simple aquarium heater, works great and is very economical, and about as much of a fire hazard as an aquarium. The only thing to do is replace evaporating water as the heater needs to remain submerged.
 

viper69

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I know this question is breed-specific, but I'm trying to figure out if I can make these Ts work with the current layout of my home. I don't have an extra room to dedicate and heat above the house temp, which averages between 65F i
2 things.

Ts are not like dogs or cats. there are no breeds. Each is a unique species. Breeds are animals of the same species w/different traits, nothing more generally speaking.

Temps at 65 regularly are not the best IMO, esp slings. Metabolism is directly related to temperature. The upper end temp you mentioned is fine generally, but I would go towards 80. Remember, in the wild Ts live in burrows to remain cooler. They aren't basking in 85 degree weather.
 

darkness975

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@Lara The house I am in drops down to the mid and sometimes low 60's F at night in winter (not my choice) and goes up to around 70 F during the day. No issues with my adults and sub adults. Slings are a different story though. The slings are in a different room that has a small space heater for the night time.

If you get a sling then you will need to keep it warmer as others have said above.

If you go with either of the two species you mentioned above (both great choices btw) then you might want to go for a sub adult instead of a sling. Easier to care for, not as delicate, and larger size as opposed to waiting a while for it to grow.
 
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