Question From A Beginer?

Shrum7

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 13, 2011
Messages
3
I'm new to the hobbie. I have had a rose haire for about 3 or 4 years. She is awsome. I have been studying as much as I can about every T that I can, because I find myself wanting more. I also have two pink toe T's that are about the same size, they are still fairly small, maybe 2 and a half 3 inches at most. I have seen some sites that suggest they can live together and others that say not to. I dont want either of them hurt but I have set up an aquarium that is very nice and big enough for both of them, with plenty of hiding spot and things to climb on. Does anyone here have any they have tried this with. Because the sit I was on said that they were the only T that could live together. Please help.....:?
 

demasoni521

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 11, 2010
Messages
20
I've heard many bad communal reports about putting avics in together and having only one fat avic in the end. I think Holothele Incei (trinidad olive) is the only TRUE communal tarantula.
 

Embers To Ashes

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
270
The tarantulas of the Avicularia genus are not comunal. However, given the right conditions, they may be able to tollerate each other. Comunal and coinhabitant are two tottaly diffrent things. I have heard of many threds where keeping two or more end badly and I have had others that have succeded. If you choose to keep them together, these are the the requirements that you must meet. (All of this is through research. I personaly have not tryed. I am not saying that all this info is 100% acurate, but this is what I have gathered.)

1- It is better if you raise the Ts together from spiderlings and do not seperate them throughout the corse of their lives. However, if you decide to get two adult or juvinile specimens that are not siblings and pair them, they must be simmeler if not the same in size

2- It is better to have three than two. If there where two, one could be dominant and pick on or kill the submisive one. If there are three, then one would be dominant and two would be submisive. This decreases the chance of canabalism of the weakest. ( This is coming from somebody who was comparing them to Oscar fish, so I have no clue if this is even remotly acurate)

3- There should be ALOT of space. A sideways twenty gallon will probably work for 2-3. More than enough climbing and hiding places should be provided.

4- All tarantulas should be VERY well fed to discurage canabalism.

********Please be aware that even if all these requirements are met, one or both of of your tarantulas could be killed*******
 

Shrum7

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 13, 2011
Messages
3
I dont think I even want to risk it anymore. I really dont want to take a chance at loosing 1 or both of them.
 

phoenixxavierre

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 9, 2002
Messages
1,293
I wouldn't risk it personally, however, when I bred A. avicularia, I had three females housed in an upright ten gallon. After breeding the three I moved them to separate enclosures. They would occasionally run into each-other when they were in the same enclosure and dart around but never ate one another. The worst they did was slap at each other. I'm sure, though, that if I had left them together for much longer, they likely would have eaten one another. My opinion is that they are capable of living near each other but in cramped quarters, and in some cases even in spacious quarters they'd likely eat one another. For two adult avics, you'd likely want at least a 40 gallon size setup. But only if you're willing to take that risk and possibly lose one to the other.
 
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