Question for higher level breeders.

2oCHEVYo0

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 29, 2010
Messages
67
Well, I've been doing some looking for other spides to put onto my wishlist and stumbled accross an EXTREMELY neat looking specimen. I've read that they are quite difficult to get ahold of for basically anyone, but there are a few that do in fact have it.

It is the Iridopelma Seladonium and man do I want me one!!! Just wondering if there are any breeders out there that have any way of importing these to the U.S. and breeding them. Not sure if this topic has ever been covered, although it probably has, just couldn't find it.

Here are some pictures of it:

http://i975.photobucket.com/albums/ae234/Hotrodding_it_up/picCube_4487d048cd.jpg

http://i975.photobucket.com/albums/ae234/Hotrodding_it_up/picCube_6b5d911742.jpg

http://i975.photobucket.com/albums/...XPwK-U6oAm1T1UKrpzFZ1evhgT56JP0cBz3SsTSVb.jpg

http://i975.photobucket.com/albums/...2KgqRWmIAm1T1UA1ZPW6857Vh2pfXJy9IC_BgJyih.jpg

Also wondering, how long do they keep this coloring?
 
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BlackCat

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 29, 2009
Messages
195
They are gorgeous!

I've been waiting so long for them to show up in the hobby, but no avail =/ lol
 

2oCHEVYo0

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 29, 2010
Messages
67
If it did, I have no doubt in my mind it would be as popular if not MORE than the P. Metallica!!!
 

mitchrobot

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Jun 12, 2006
Messages
286
i was under the impression that they stayed pretty darn tiny (i believe the ones in the pics are adults, or near it)
 

BCscorp

Arachnoprince
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Oct 22, 2007
Messages
1,099
In your research did you happen to see where they are from?
Should answer your question.
 

patrickbull

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
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Sep 18, 2006
Messages
115
Ummmmm....I'm not exactly a "Higher Level Breeder" but I think my "Average Breeding Intelligence" has found some good info to include in this thread lol.



In your research did you happen to see where they are from?


I found a nice journal article on this species. I'll post the link below. From the info I read it doesn't look like we will see any imported anytime soon. They are from a critically endangered rainforest in Brazil........



Click this link for the entire Article: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_pdf&pid=S0101-81752008000400019&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en
It is known only from Brazilian Atlantic rainforest in the states of Bahia and Sergipe which, according to "World Wildlife Fund - WWF" and Brazilian governmental agencies, is a region of great importance for the conservation of Atlantic Rainforest vertebrates (MMA 2000). It is also critically endangered area and less than five percent of the original forest remains, being considered third level of priority among Brazilian conservation categories.
None the less we can always hope and pray it finds a way into our hobby one day!
 
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Comatose

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Aug 25, 2004
Messages
436
They'll show up in Europe eventually and work their way here. Expect P. metallica prices.

While I think the conservationists have their hearts in the right place, the best thing that could happen to this species is for it to find it's way into the hobby. Nothing's going to stop the engine of destruction in the rain forest... IMHO this species would be better protected by hobbyists than tree huggers. :)
 

jayefbe

Arachnoprince
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Sep 20, 2009
Messages
1,355
They'll show up in Europe eventually and work their way here. Expect P. metallica prices.

While I think the conservationists have their hearts in the right place, the best thing that could happen to this species is for it to find it's way into the hobby. Nothing's going to stop the engine of destruction in the rain forest... IMHO this species would be better protected by hobbyists than tree huggers. :)
I understand the desire to keep a species in the hobby even if it is extinct in the wild, but it's not really doing anything from a conservation standpoint. I'm not saying on it's face it is bad to keep endangered species in captivity so long as collecting is not adding significant pressure on wild populations, but maintaining a "hobby population" of a species is a very different thing from maintaining stable natural populations in thriving ecosystems. Once it's gone from the wild, that lineage with its evolutionary history and future trajectory, is gone. Keeping an extinct species in the hobby is better than nothing, but in my opinion, just barely.

Brazil is about the most difficult country when it comes to legal exportation of wildlife. Want to work on a common fruit fly from Brazil? Gotta find a collaborator within the country to do it. They will not export them even if it's for legitimate, federally funded research on a common species.

As far as I. seladonium goes, I think it's going to be a very long time before the average hobbyist can get their hands on it. P. metallica took nearly a decade to go from "in the hobby amongst a very select few" to "available to those with the cash to spend", and I think I. seladonium is even more rare in collections than P. metallica was. From all my reading, I still haven't heard of a confirmed sac. I'm sure a lot of that is because people are trying to stay under the radar, but I've heard surprisingly little about confirmed collections.
 

Earth Tiger

Arachnoknight
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Joined
Dec 9, 2003
Messages
275
They'll show up in Europe eventually and work their way here. Expect P. metallica prices.

While I think the conservationists have their hearts in the right place, the best thing that could happen to this species is for it to find it's way into the hobby. Nothing's going to stop the engine of destruction in the rain forest... IMHO this species would be better protected by hobbyists than tree huggers. :)
I guess most species are better protected by hobbyists. The sad truth is most of these fine species originate from the developing countries and their conservation measures are sloppy at best. Take for example the Bengal tigers, the officials rely on footprints for the tiger numbers and thus inflating the numbers (footprints can be left by dead tigers when they were alive and remained there for a long time, and the same tiger leaves footprints that are counted as different individuals by the officicals), the rangers carry no firearm to deal with the illegal poachers and a large portion of donation ends up in the corrupted hands (e.g. large scale watch towers were built when there was nothing to watch and no ranger to guard the towers). In recent years I rarely donated to these funds anymore and I guess the best way to protect them is to keep them as pets until there are twilights on the protection schemes...
 

groovyspider

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
257
Well thats like too isnt the crested gecko almost completly wiped out in its original habaitat minus whats in the hobby
 

Kungfujoe

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 29, 2011
Messages
266
Wow that is a beautiful T. It seems the same situation is happening with the worlds reefs; for example various sps coral and the green nephti. It actually is whipped out in the wild but thanks to aquariums and new sustainable collection; people are putting it back.
 
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