Puncture proof surgical gloves..

Charlie_Scorp

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
146
Hey everyone. I was interested to see if a puncture proof glove was available and after a little while I've found that whilst no glove is currently punture proof, many are manufactured to be pucture resistant. BUT...it has been invented!
I found this patent application which I guess is still pending...or it has been granted and the funding is still needed for delelopment. Its designed for surgical applications and therefore very felexible.

Apart from the obvious benfits to surgeons and people clearing sharps and needles..it would be handy to have them within arachnidology to dont you think?

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6272687.html

Charlie
 

EAD063

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 3, 2006
Messages
1,415
Yes those would definently be cool, especially if they were economical enough to be disposed of, then they could be used for picking up dead speciemen and such.. plus, I'll get to retire this heavy chain-mail I'm using. {D {D
 

Brian S

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
May 29, 2004
Messages
6,543
I doubt I would use them if I had them. A pair of forceps is all thats needed ;)
 

SouthernStyle

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
Messages
492
I dont know what to think about those, I'll tell ya though there are some people on here that DONT like the idea of people holding Their T's with Gloves (and I'm sure he'll have something to say about this too) PERSONALLY, If I have to do anything with a T that is a biter (My Haps are GREAT for it) I wear a Set of Law Enforcement Gloves that are pretty well composed of over 50% Kevlar, I've yet (and not that I entice my T's to bite, but it does happen from time to time) had ANY of my T's Puncture through them, and if you can find them I would DEFINATLY reccomend them highly! The easiest way to find them would be Through Galls Police Supply...
Here Is a couple I would check out, They're a good investment, but only are designed for small gague needles (although my Haps are 4"+ and havn't got through)....Check it out~

http://www.galls.com/style.html?assort=general_catalog&style=GL005

http://www.galls.com/style.html?assort=general_catalog&style=GL135

These next ones are the ones that I carry with me when I am On Duty...
http://www.galls.com/style.html?assort=general_catalog&style=GL213

Hope that helps!
 

Selenops

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 13, 2006
Messages
844
Rubbertipped forceps and rubbertipped hemostats is all I'll ever need.

Disposable puncture proof gloves... hmmm. A fat tail scorpion is said to be capable of puncturing boot leather... HMMM.

Not sure either claim rings entirely true.
 

SouthernStyle

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
Messages
492
uuuuuh......... well holding a Hap is enticing it to bite
Mine Don't seem to be the Biters, Only had one female take a shot at me once, and she didnt puncture the gloves at all....But Definatly true, ya could look at them crosseyed and get bit ::Grins::
 

Selenops

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 13, 2006
Messages
844
Now, I've seen people on TV and have seen pics online by hobbyist whom handle their widows. Sure, widows can be docile, I have softly stroked the dorsal side of their abdomens and did Michaelagelo's "Creation of Adam" fresco deal with one of their front legs and sit there for long moments in this pose... fingertip to tarsus (these leggy L hesperus can quite calm creatures). Other times they've turned into the infamous hesperus webslinger too.

But handle em, I can not do because there's no guarantees the widow won't take a provoked or simply curious nip with fangs millimeters away from my soft flesh. I strongly discourage it and because they're for that reason alone.

These gloves adorning hands of such folks is an improvement.
 

Normski2020uk

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 18, 2005
Messages
603
I would be interested to see the specifics of these gloves. When you dealing with medical/surgical sharps they are all designed to Cut skin, event needles, they have 2 scaple like edges, that cut and lift the skin. A scorpion sting on the other hand does puncture, and if these gloves are maed up of woven fibers designed to stop the cuting action, it could easely seperate them and make it through.
Mt personal thougts are, if you have a jumpy or aggresive scorp and you have to handle it, scoop it up, or use forceps. I have a welders gauntlet, big, heavy leather, and its taken a couple of strikes. and it protects well from nips, of recived a couple of nips of my emps, and its all good.
Obviously the best option is not to handle them at all but, in reality even the most dedicated and profestion scorp keeprs have to handle at some point, and ive been suprised a couple of times by a Scopr i couldnt see when i was cleaning!!! LOL
Basicaly what im saying is you cant go wrong with an oldfashioned pair of leather gloves, or forceps. I talk to much
 

Charlie_Scorp

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Messages
146
I think people have slightly misunderstood my interest in this patent application. I never hold any of my animals and never have. I just personally dont feel the need or desire to.
However, when I saw this it firstly struck me as a very ingenius invention and secondly I saw the application of them for safer cage work. Designing something that can completely resist puncturing from hypodermics AND surgical sharps is quite an achivement.

I didn't think these would enable people to start holding all their hot scorps, I thought it had the potential to add a bit of extra safety during transfers, packing or just dipping your hand into an ellaborate, communal Tityus or Centuroides setup, even with 12" forceps..
 

SouthernStyle

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 10, 2006
Messages
492
Simply put however, There ARE options out there for people who DO want to hold their Scorps and T's...Frankly the Kevlar is my first choice...HANDS DOWN
 

Crono

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 18, 2006
Messages
530
1- They might not be sufficent protection and could only provide a false sense of security, letting people take chances they shouldn't

2- It can be difficult to gauge how much pressure is needed to safely restrain an invert with even thin gloves on. You could injure the animal, it could get loose, or both could happen. (and would you want an injured and panicked Tityus or Scolopendra running up your sleeve?) This pretty much rules them out for actually handling the invert

There are better methods known already, such as long forceps, cupping, and in the case of scorps, using a blacklight to scope out the area you are going to be working in, just so you can keep track of cryptically coloured bark scorpions.

I think they would be a waste of money personally.
 
Top