Pseudoscorpions with small mites (photos)

Biollantefan54

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 3, 2012
Messages
2,133
Hey everyone! I recently went out after a rain spell and collected a bunch of springtails from some trees that I want to culture. During rainy days, the springtails huddle on trees in the cracks and crevices of the wet areas in the bark. While I was collecting some, I caught a pseudoscorpion. This is not the usual Chthonius tetrachelatus I can easily find in my yard, it’s a member of the superfamily Cheliferoidea. I decided to keep it, I already had tons of springtails to feed it, so I made a little “enclosure” out of a tiny tiny vial and threw in a few pinches of dirt and leaf bits and a tiny piece of bark from the tree. It’s been doing good, as far as I can tell, and I decided to photograph it today. I’ve had it for about a week now and noticed that it has tons of mites on it. I had no idea until I looked at it earlier today with my camera. I am positive these were on it when I collected it, as I’ve only had it for a week. These photos are about 5x in magnification, if anyone knows how big pseudoscorpions are, you’ll understand how tiny these mites are. I’m not sure if these mites are parasitic or if they are just hitching a ride in the pseudoscorpion, like how this pseudoscorpion might hitch a ride on a fly or beetle. Either way, I think it is super cool to see this all happening at such a tiny scale. Hopefully I can figure out what mites these are, at least to a family level.
0B9593C0-79F8-45A2-9FE5-E9415D0C77A7.jpeg 0A7797A8-06E8-40AD-AC26-7BA7ECFB2237.jpeg 1FA3CBD9-4914-4BB2-A515-F2D761349489.jpeg D32E1F5D-933F-442A-92D2-6289DA217182.jpeg
Closeup of the legs 7558D5F2-C84A-4E5A-973F-C2695D5F30E2.jpeg
Closeup of the claws 1E3C874E-FA78-43C9-A17C-33AE511CAF63.jpeg
 

Jimmyboi

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
7
They look like mites to me but more importantly, what's your camera setup? You should probably be getting paid for this quality of photography.
 

Biollantefan54

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 3, 2012
Messages
2,133
They look like mites to me but more importantly, what's your camera setup? You should probably be getting paid for this quality of photography.
Thank you so much! My camera is a Nikon D7500 and a Laowa 25mm at 5x. I use two remote flashes on little maneuverable arms with diffusers on them positioned on the sides of the subject. It gives a really nice light (when the flashes work!)
 

Biollantefan54

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 3, 2012
Messages
2,133
I’ve since learned that these mites are probably in the family Acaridae, but I’d need to look at them under the microscope to tell. I do have the tools needed to do that, however I don’t want to risk hurting the pseudoscorpion to get the mites! The mites are not really dangerous, they apparently don’t even really have mouths yet. They are babies just hitchhiking, so the pseudoscorpion is apparently getting a taste of it’s own medicine
 

DustyD

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 4, 2021
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163
Fantastic job! Thanks again for providing a glimpse of the amazing natural world around us that often goes unnoticed ( at least by me).
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
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Aug 8, 2005
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10,411
That group includes numerous predatorial and parasitic mites. Since you have the wherewithal, try to get a sideways look at the mouth parts. You are looking for one or two penetrating tubular extensions which is the easy way to tell problematic from benign mites. That tube is absent in the foraging species.
BTW, most mites mature within a couple of weeks. Some in a few days.

Grain mite L, Scabies R
1680213472010.png 1680213621600.png
 
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Charonius

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 3, 2023
Messages
1
I think that hairs is a way to defend from this mites, hinder moves and space.
 
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