Psalmopoeus Irminia

Crazyartistman90

Arachnopeon
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Nov 15, 2016
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So my sub adult P. irminia has sealed off its burrow for around 3 to 4 weeks, I haven't had to much concern as i knew she was molting, but when i woke up this morning i saw her molt sitting in the corner of her enclosure right by her water dish, i am assuming it is a fresh molt as it is still pretty soft, but i'm not sure. i am very happy, but not sure if i should offer food item yet or not. she is back in her burrow and i my first instinct says to wait till i see her out hunting before offering a cricket, she hasn't taken a roach for me yet. any additional advice would be great as this is my first T that i have had that likes to burrow, and my emerald skeletons burrow is right next to the glass. im going to wait and and see if she comes out in a few days, my main concern is that these Ts tend to be pet holes and don't want to starve her. thank you.
 

Andy00

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Feb 4, 2016
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Wait atleast a week until feeding especially if you think the molt was still soft. After about a week or two, if she hasn't already come out to hunt, try her on a prey item. Keep the water dish full and easy to get to for her :)
 

Venom1080

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generally, after finding a molt, i wait a week before trying to feed. if you see her out before than, id try a feeding.
 

user 666

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Call me a noob, but I thought Irminia were arboreal?

Should I be housing my .5" Irminia with enough substrate for a burrow?
 

cold blood

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Call me a noob, but I thought Irminia were arboreal?

Should I be housing my .5" Irminia with enough substrate for a burrow?
That is their classification....but the truth is, that aside from Avicularia (and its close sub-families), almost all arboreals start out life on or under the ground. I only see true arboreal behavior from larger Psalmopeous species. In fact, I don't house them arboreally until near adulthood. Like I said, this rule basically applies to anything arboreal that's not an Avic or a close relative (like Iridopelma for instance).

Op, a soft molt means a very fresh molt. My Psalms, specifically irminia, generally wait a good 2 weeks before they start hunting. My suggestion is just to wait till it (or its feet) emerges and begins to hunt....don't try to force the issue, it will let you know when its ready.

I'm also impressed, when my irminia girls seal up for pre-molt, it usually means 3-7 months of hiding before finally molting.
 
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Jeff23

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That is their classification....but the truth is, that aside from Avicularia (and its close sub-families), almost all arboreals start out life on or under the ground. I only see true arboreal behavior from larger Psalmopeous species. In fact, I don't house them arboreally until near adulthood. Like I said, this rule basically applies to anything arboreal that's not an Avic or a close relative (like Iridopelma for instance).

Op, a soft molt means a very fresh molt. My Psalms, specifically irminia, generally wait a good 2 weeks before they starts hunting. My suggestion is just to wait till it (or its feet) emerges and begins to hunt....don't try to force the issue, it will let you know when its ready.

I'm also impressed, when my irminia girls seal up for pre-molt, it usually means 3-7 months of hiding before finally molting.
That is what I am getting on my p. cam's that I bought from you as well. They are building dirt mounds that look kind of like miniature volcano's on the substrate. Even my Tapi's all started their nests against the cork bark at the substrate level and have slowly building web up higher in the air after a time period.

Call me a noob, but I thought Irminia were arboreal?

Should I be housing my .5" Irminia with enough substrate for a burrow?
I gave my 0.5" irminia sling about 1.5" of substrate. I don't think it is not burrowing down much if any. But it is hard to tell because the dirt curtain hides the internals of the nest. Mine has slowly built the dirt curtain upward for a distance of a few inches on the inside of the cork tube.
 

user 666

Arachnobaron
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Thank you both. I will add rehousing my Irminia to my to-do list.

I would do it tonight but the one enclosure I have ready is going to an H. gabonensis which is still in a pill vial.
 

Jeff23

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Thank you both. I will add rehousing my Irminia to my to-do list.

I would do it tonight but the one enclosure I have ready is going to an H. gabonensis which is still in a pill vial.
A 32 oz deli cup works great.
 

viper69

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but not sure if i should offer food item yet or not.
@Crazyartistman90 There is only one 100% accurate method for feeding your T post-molt, I'm surprised you haven't come across this yet. You feed when the fangs are black. After molting, they change color from to White>Red>Black.

The larger the T gets the longer it takes to change color. If you feed when fangs are too soft, fangs get chipped or worse fall off. If your T loses both fangs, it may die.
 

Shudragon

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Literally just ordered one of these beauties, glad I found an easy thread on them. Would semi arboreal work for a 1.5 inch sling? Just a high cork hide with a few inches of sub?
 

cold blood

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I am not a fan of deli cups. I prefer something more solid, something I can add scenery to.
Huh? You can add the exact same wood and plants to a deli cup. It in no way restricts your creativity.

Deli cups are a person raising slings' best friend.
 

cold blood

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Literally just ordered one of these beauties, glad I found an easy thread on them. Would semi arboreal work for a 1.5 inch sling? Just a high cork hide with a few inches of sub?
Theyre very adaptable, you can house it arboreally or terrestrially and everything in-between.

answer: yes, as long as it has good cover....they hate to be exposed.
 

Crazyartistman90

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@Crazyartistman90 There is only one 100% accurate method for feeding your T post-molt, I'm surprised you haven't come across this yet. You feed when the fangs are black. After molting, they change color from to White>Red>Black.

The larger the T gets the longer it takes to change color. If you feed when fangs are too soft, fangs get chipped or worse fall off. If your T loses both fangs, it may die.
I am aware of this info. but when i cannot see her fangs because she is hiding under ground it is kinda hard.
 

user 666

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Huh? You can add the exact same wood and plants to a deli cup. It in no way restricts your creativity.

Deli cups are a person raising slings' best friend.
I like AMAC boxes or Hobby Lobby display cases because I can use a hot glue gun to attach cork bark and plastic plants as a background.

The requisite surface is flat and rigid, two things you can't say about the side of a quart deli cup.
 

Crazyartistman90

Arachnopeon
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Nov 15, 2016
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Thank you everyone for the info. When i came home from work i was able to see legs one and two sticking out of her hole, but she vanished as soon as she realized she was being watched. I was planning on waiting a week anyways but its always good to get a second opinion. And for the record what i did see of her was absolutely stunning jet black with tiny orange chevrons. love this species. thanks everyone again.
 
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