Predators that cohabitate with millipedes/gnat solutions

Godzilla90fan

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2021
Messages
61
Have been expanding the terrariums for my American giants, and occasionally I'll notice a few gnats hovering about. They're an eyesore to an otherwise beautiful setup. I had considering putting Venus flytraps in as both decoration and pest control, but I feel they may eat my smaller millipedes.

Does anyone have a solution? I'd prefer a bio friendly way to handle them (such as a predator) but understand that most things that eat gnats probably would try to eat my millipedes. Thanks all.
 

Lordosteous

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 25, 2020
Messages
11
I assume what you have is Fungus Gnats. Green lacewings (Chrysoperla sp.) and Fungus gnat rove beetles (Dalotia coriaria) are both good options, neither will harm millipedes. Both can be bought online or at some gardening stores, or you can catch the lacewings pretty easily yourself. Hanging strips of fly paper is also a good option for really bad infestations, just make sure the paper is hanging so that no millipedes can crawl onto it and get stuck.
Also worth noting, fungus gnats are not harmful to terrariums or millipedes. Although not the prettiest thing to see, it is normal and inevitable for some to show up in enclosures.
Best of luck!
 

GardenDrag0n

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 12, 2021
Messages
2
My solution was perhaps overkill, but I bought a bunch of stick-on 2 micron filter patches and covered my ventilation holes with those. Keeps bugs in and out. Cheap and I wanted something that looked "neat" since most of my enclosures are display enclosures.

If you don't mind the look, sticky traps with or without UV lights will help cut down on stragglers.

Other critters that you can introduce that won't hurt the millipedes are a number of different springtail species. They will usually outcompete the fungus gnats without harming the millipedes when their populations stabilize.

As a side note I noticed a dramatic drop in gnat activity after my substrates matured.
 

Malum Argenteum

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2020
Messages
240
I've had good luck putting DIY vinegar traps nearby (take a bowl, add some apple cider vinegar -- I use the real stuff, but idk if it is necessary -- rinse and refill as needed). That coupled with attempting to keep them out of the viv by modifying the ventilation should be sufficient.
 

Godzilla90fan

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2021
Messages
61
I assume what you have is Fungus Gnats. Green lacewings (Chrysoperla sp.) and Fungus gnat rove beetles (Dalotia coriaria) are both good options, neither will harm millipedes. Both can be bought online or at some gardening stores, or you can catch the lacewings pretty easily yourself. Hanging strips of fly paper is also a good option for really bad infestations, just make sure the paper is hanging so that no millipedes can crawl onto it and get stuck.
Also worth noting, fungus gnats are not harmful to terrariums or millipedes. Although not the prettiest thing to see, it is normal and inevitable for some to show up in enclosures.
Best of luck!
Going to have to try the gnat beetles out. I have been experimenting with various beetles in 1 on 1 enclosures with my millipedes. So far the only bad experience was with the glowworm beetle, which I was aware predated on millipedes. It quickly ate one of my polydesmids
 

Godzilla90fan

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2021
Messages
61
My solution was perhaps overkill, but I bought a bunch of stick-on 2 micron filter patches and covered my ventilation holes with those. Keeps bugs in and out. Cheap and I wanted something that looked "neat" since most of my enclosures are display enclosures.

If you don't mind the look, sticky traps with or without UV lights will help cut down on stragglers.

Other critters that you can introduce that won't hurt the millipedes are a number of different springtail species. They will usually outcompete the fungus gnats without harming the millipedes when their populations stabilize.

As a side note I noticed a dramatic drop in gnat activity after my substrates matured.
I have noticed this as well now. I used to see about 12 at a time, now I have to stand for a bit to see 1 or 2.
 

coolnweird

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2019
Messages
149
Flytraps would be no good, they need more light than an enclosure would provide. With the inclusion of a small plant light and some cork wall mounts, pinguicula or "butterworts" might work! If you're interested I can DM you some online store recommendations
 

Godzilla90fan

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2021
Messages
61
Flytraps would be no good, they need more light than an enclosure would provide. With the inclusion of a small plant light and some cork wall mounts, pinguicula or "butterworts" might work! If you're interested I can DM you some online store recommendations
They seem like an interesting option, but I wonder if my Millis would get to them ?
 

coolnweird

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2019
Messages
149
They seem like an interesting option, but I wonder if my Millis would get to them ?
In my opinion a Ping is not sticky enough to trap even the tiniest of babies. Anything bigger than a sugar ant should be able to walk right over it. They really only have enough stick to catch fruit flies, fungus gnats, mayflies, etc! Not sure if the millis would try to eat the plant though, or if it would harm them
 

TooManyCooks

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
Messages
27
I had a gnat problem in my tylobolus millipede tank, so i collected some soil centipedes from the same area and tossed 'em in, thinking they'd eat the gnats. worked like a charm for a while, but they must've died out because the gnats returned.

Now i just keep a random tiny spider in my remaining millipede tanks. they help out quite a bit, but they don't get everything and sometimes i have to release the spiders and get new ones if they get too big. Also kinda limited with options, since i wouldnt recommend using any sort of cobweb spider after an "incident" that saw the death of a large tylobolus millipede.
 

Ian14

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Nov 27, 2019
Messages
314
Unless you have a soaking wet substrate then avoid any of the carnivorous plants. They need very high humidity and wet peat to grow in. They generally are only found in highly acidic soils, with next to no nutrients, hence the adaptation to trap and "eat" animals. Butterworts also grow quite large. When I used to keep carnivorous plants I had a number of them, and they would often have quite large prey trapped on the leaves.
If you are determined to try using these, I would suggest that you try some of the dwarf species of sundew, such as Drosera brevifolia. They also do not need such bright lighting as many other species.
 
Top