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Possible mycosis?

Discussion in 'Myriapods' started by vyadha, May 6, 2019.

  1. vyadha

    vyadha Arachnosquire

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    S heros heros blotched female. One corner is kept moist by misting twice a week. I checked if there is any pooling of water or visible mold and none. A thriving springtail colony is in the enclosure. A micro fan is angled into the enclosure every other day to increase ventilation.
    Substrate is 50% sand, 30% coco, 20% potting soil.

    I noticed the black on the antennae last week, the day after she was fed a large orange head nymph that got a few kicks in.

    No other visible black spots so Im thinking these could be mechanical injuries from the roach or mycosis. Other heros enclosures are kept the same and no signs.

    Tips?
     
  2. LeFanDesBugs

    LeFanDesBugs Arachnobaron

    Keep her a bit drier.. that’s all. Nothing to worry about for now.
     
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  3. l4nsky

    l4nsky Arachnoknight Active Member

    STL
    The fact that you have a thriving springtail colony in a desert pede enclosure tells me it might be a little too moist. I'd definently dry it out a bit more.

    Thanks,
    --Matt
     
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  4. REEFSPIDER

    REEFSPIDER Arachnobaron

    I've collected springtails from some very Very dry locations.
     
  5. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Injured areas turn black but mycosis causes injury so it's hard to tell. Moisture usually causes a systemic infection on inverts so when that's a problem, you'd probably see it on several legs especially at the joints.
     
  6. l4nsky

    l4nsky Arachnoknight Active Member

    STL
    I believe it. When conditions are dry they congregate in moist areas, making collection rather easy if you look under a rock with moist earth. I wouldn't call them thriving though.

    Check the second leg discoloration at the tip and joint.
     
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  7. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    I saw that, could be that leg was injured.
     
  8. vyadha

    vyadha Arachnosquire

    Either way, the fan is running and keeping her dry.
    The enclosure definitely looks on the dry side so hoping it’s mechanical.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Just makes sense injuries can get infected too with bacteria and fungi so if there is a fungus infection, just looks local to me from your pic anyway. Yeah if you keep it on the dry side, seems to me it'd be OK. If you start seeing it get dark at the joints on maybe 5+ legs, that's a sign there's an environmental issue, from my experience anyway.
     
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  10. REEFSPIDER

    REEFSPIDER Arachnobaron

    You're implying that springtails need to retire to cover/humidity to remain able to thrive in environments lacking moisture, but pedes don't? How can a springtail population thriving lead you to believe it's too wet if both springtails and pedes live in the deserts. ?
     
  11. l4nsky

    l4nsky Arachnoknight Active Member

    STL
    The difference in their breathing mechanisms. Springtails breathe through a porous cuticle and can only control the amount of moisture they lose by staying in moist environments. Pedes breathe through their spiracles, which can narrow in dry environments to prevent water loss from respiration.
     
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