Possible comeback?

Ratmosphere

Arachnoking
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Aug 23, 2015
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After visiting the New York reptile expo yesterday, seeing all of the tarantulas made me miss the ones I sold. The lady I sold them to was actually there and selling my old Ts for way more than I sold it to her. This broke my heart. I originally wanted to get an African giant millipede but after going to the expo I had second thoughts. I am considering getting a T again. My choices are between Aphonopelma chalcodes and Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. Which one should I get?
 

Trenor

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Jan 28, 2016
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If you've kept Ts before either of those should be easy for you to care for. At that point it just depends on what you are looking for in a T. I personally am fond of C.cyaneopubescens for their growth, webbing and colors. I do like the A.chalcodes as well. Both are great Ts IMO.
 

Andrea82

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I you don't mind me asking, what was the reason you didn't want to keep T's anymore? Was it something specific, like not being able to cope with urticating hairs or just T's in general?
I'm asking because if it is something specific, you might want to change from the T's you had to some other species.
Of the two you mention, I'd go with a C.cyaneopubescens.
 

KezyGLA

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Apr 8, 2016
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C. cyaneo. But that is just my personal preference as they have more color, more active better appetite and make pretty enclosures :)
 

Ratmosphere

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I you don't mind me asking, what was the reason you didn't want to keep T's anymore? Was it something specific, like not being able to cope with urticating hairs or just T's in general?
I'm asking because if it is something specific, you might want to change from the T's you had to some other species.
Of the two you mention, I'd go with a C.cyaneopubescens.
The reason why I sold them is because they became super defensive. Seems like a dumb reason but it freaked me out at the time because they were suppose to be "docile" species. I regret it now of course! Aren't Green Bottle Blue tarantulas super fast too?
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
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Unfortunately, even with the most tolerant of species there is never any guarantee that you won't get a defensive individual. I have two female C. cyaneopubescens and, while they are not really defensive, they are very skittish and fast. This past weekend, one of them started kicking hairs at me during feeding time and neither have ever done that. They are the two that I am most on guard with from an escape, bolting, perspective. If you were uncomfortable with them being defensive, I would not suggest a skittish and fast species like that.
But, my A. chalcodes is no pet rock either. She has never shown any defensive behaviour, not even hair kicking, but she is very active and has a habit of quickly heading towards me whenever I open her enclosure. I have to keep my eye on her as well. There are others who have had fairly defensive individuals of that species too.
Out of the two that you have mentioned, and based on why you sold your collection, my vote is for the A. chalcodes.
 

Rittdk01

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The reason why I sold them is because they became super defensive. Seems like a dumb reason but it freaked me out at the time because they were suppose to be "docile" species. I regret it now of course! Aren't Green Bottle Blue tarantulas super fast too?
Don't know that u should get back in if they freak u out. Feeding time and maintenance will never go well if u are scared of your tarantulas. honestly, you sold off your collection so your heart wasn't in it. Loads of hobbies, most easier to quit than tarantula keeping. Jmo
 

Anthro1985

Arachnopeon
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Nov 27, 2016
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After visiting the New York reptile expo yesterday, seeing all of the tarantulas made me miss the ones I sold. The lady I sold them to was actually there and selling my old Ts for way more than I sold it to her. This broke my heart. I originally wanted to get an African giant millipede but after going to the expo I had second thoughts. I am considering getting a T again. My choices are between Aphonopelma chalcodes and Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. Which one should I get?
I was actually at the same show. No one is selling African millipedes anymore. There hard to get. There going for around 73 bucks with shipping. I'm saving up to get a male and female so I can breed them myself.
 

Andrea82

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Don't know that u should get back in if they freak u out. Feeding time and maintenance will never go well if u are scared of your tarantulas. honestly, you sold off your collection so your heart wasn't in it. Loads of hobbies, most easier to quit than tarantula keeping. Jmo
That is not entirely true.
When i got two P.irminia slings a year and a half ago, one escaped, and I became frightened to interact (feeding and maintenance), with them. The fact that they were defensive along with fast, I lost my
confidence in dealing with T's, including the 'docile' ones like my E.campestratus. I sold the irminia, but didn't give up on my other T's, and over time I became more
confident, to the point that I now feel secure enough to keep an E.murinus, and a P.muticus.
So getting scared doesn't mean you shouldn't keep T's at all. It just
means you're not ready to deal with more difficult or fast species.

@Ratmosphere
It is true that every T, how docile they are, can become defensive. But thar being said, you could go for Aphonopelma, from what I've read they are more slow and docile. Another species could be E.sp.Red, or an E.campestratus. I wouldn't go with a C.cyaneopubescens, since they are quite fast and nervous.
Start slow, and gain confidence over time before you get another. Getting scared is no biggy, I think we all had our hearts in our throats at one point with keeping T's ;)
However, if your fear doesn't diminish over time, I would consider starting another hobby. But not just yet. ;)
 
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Graves6661

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Dec 31, 2015
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My favorite T I currently own is the Acanthoscurria geniculata. When I first got her she was quite skittish doing laps around the enclosure or trying to bolt out if anything disturbed or spooked her. After she got settled in I havent had that problem. Not defensive at all except when in premolt. Not a pet hole or rock and always on display making her rounds about the enclosure in the evening.

My GBB used to be the one I was cautious around. The slightest vibration would usually set him off and he would bolt. Now hes a bit too old to bolt when spooked. He barely moves a few inches if I touch him with a paint brush.
 

Ratmosphere

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Aug 23, 2015
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It just frustrates me because I never thought a Brachypelma smithi would throw up a threat posture so often. It was almost every time I opened the enclosure to offer him food he would be pissed. Maybe I jumped the gun too fast in selling him along with a female Avicularia versicolor. I'm ready to give the hobby another shot. Thank you for all of the help guys!
 

gypsy cola

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do you want a really good burger or a really good slice of pizza?

The solution is to buy the pizza and cut it up. Place the cut up pizza in the burger and then consume.
 

mistertim

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The reason why I sold them is because they became super defensive. Seems like a dumb reason but it freaked me out at the time because they were suppose to be "docile" species. I regret it now of course! Aren't Green Bottle Blue tarantulas super fast too?
I wouldn't call them "super fast" but I would say they're quicker than most NW terrestrials. They can be skittish and they ARE quick, but I've never seen any defensive behavior from my 3" juvie. One of the important things IME with them is to give them anchor points for webbing. They tend to be a bit less skittish when they can build big webs where they feel secure inside.
 

chanda

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The reason why I sold them is because they became super defensive. Seems like a dumb reason but it freaked me out at the time because they were suppose to be "docile" species. I regret it now of course! Aren't Green Bottle Blue tarantulas super fast too?
Yes, as others have already said, GBB's can be fast and skittish. They aren't as fast as my Pokie - but my GBB's are much, much more defensive. When the Pokie is disturbed, he just runs and hides behind his little dirt curtain. The GBB's will also run and hide in their webbing - sometimes. But they are also quick to flick hairs whenever I open their enclosures to feed them, water them, pick out molts or dead crickets, etc. Granted, every spider will have its own personality - but after three GBB's that have all been vigorous hair-kickers, I have to say I'm sensing a trend.

I've never owned an A. chalcodes. The wild ones that I've seen while out hiking in Arizona do seem to be a bit more skittish than my local (SoCal) Aphonopelma species. It's rare for me to see the chalcodes far from a burrow and they typically zip down the burrow, out of sight, before I can even get close enough to take a decent picture, let alone catch one. The SoCal locals, on the other hand, are frequently out wandering around - and they'll let me walk right up and take close-up pictures or even pick them up. Granted, the majority of them are mature males - but I've also found juveniles (unknown sex) out wandering around. (The mature females, on the other hand, seem to stick pretty close to their burrows just like the chalcodes do.)
 

Jeff23

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The key for me on my GBB is to not do jerky movements. If you are nervous around them they will probably be nervous too. I just do slow steady movements and mine almost never move more than an inch while I am moving my hands to do maintenance or feed them. Sometimes they will move more when the lid is opened or closed however ( so I always partially open the lid and then look at their location before getting full access)
 

Andrea82

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It just frustrates me because I never thought a Brachypelma smithi would throw up a threat posture so often. It was almost every time I opened the enclosure to of him food he would be pissed. Maybe I jumped the gun too fast in selling him along with a female Avicularia versicolor. I'm ready to give the hobby another shot. Thank you for all of the help guys!
If you get another T, and it turns
out to be defensive all the time, you could trade it with someone for a more docile spider. Most spiders are a bit more edgy when in premolt, or have a quirk like getting defensive because you steal and clean their waterdish.
 

Ratmosphere

Arachnoking
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Aug 23, 2015
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Here's the dilemma. The $50 dollar female Aphonopelma chalcodes someone is offering me is wild caught. Is it worth it? Also, would a species to consider be a Grammostola pulchra?
 

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
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195
Here's the dilemma. The $50 dollar female Aphonopelma chalcodes someone is offering me is wild caught. Is it worth it? Also, would a species to consider be a Grammostola pulchra?
I think so, that is what I paid for mine. Make sure to find out what the locality of it if possible. G.pulchra is a little pricey for a sling for my tastes. If you can get a good deal on a G.pulchra, jump on it. Large, pretty, and mellow. Girls love this species for some reason
 

Moonohol

Two Legged Freak
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Aug 8, 2016
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Here's the dilemma. The $50 dollar female Aphonopelma chalcodes someone is offering me is wild caught. Is it worth it? Also, would a species to consider be a Grammostola pulchra?
Can't speak to the A. chalcodes, but G. pulchra is one of my favorite species and sounds like it would be a pretty good fit for you. Mine is very active but never defensive/skittish, and a great eater as well. And that gorgeous jet black coloration... you can't beat it!
 
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