Please Identify this spider.

Gila Spider

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 10, 2002
Messages
6
OK, I am sure you people can ID this spider.

And if you use the scientific name please include it's common name too because I am somewhat new to this.

Thank you in advance.
 

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MrT

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 13, 2002
Messages
2,174
Is it a wild caught New Mexico T ? If so, where did you catch it, area wise ? It might help to identify..

Ernie
 

Brandon

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
415
Depending on location of the catch that defentally resembles Aphonopelma Behlei.

Sincerely,

Brandon
 

Tarantula Lover

Psalmopoeus Lover
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 21, 2002
Messages
1,373
Originally posted by Gila Spider
OK, I am sure you people can ID this spider.

And if you use the scientific name please include it's common name too because I am somewhat new to this.

Thank you in advance.
I will also go with Aphonopelma Behlei(scientific name) and the common name is-Grand Canyon Black, Good Luck!

James
 

dilleo

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 26, 2002
Messages
111
Most of the Aphonopelma behlei I've seen have a little more blue than that to them if you ask me. I don't think it's behlei.

-Jeremy
 

Chris

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 9, 2002
Messages
284
Originally posted by Gila Spider
OK, I am sure you people can ID this spider.

And if you use the scientific name please include it's common name too because I am somewhat new to this.

Thank you in advance.
Looks like a B. Vagans (Mexican Red Rump)
 

Gila Spider

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 10, 2002
Messages
6
Sorry, I meant to mention where it was found...

In the Gila National Forest in New Mexico (Southwest corner of state) @ 7,000ft.

Another pic:
 
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Brandon

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
415
Im extreamly glad this post came back up, because a person posted that it couldnt be A behlei because of the color. But did everyone know that color has nothing to do with how they descride a tarantula species? Its done by using the length of hair, how many hairs there are, curvature of legs, length of leg segments, ect. I have caught tarantulas from 5 feet from each other that look absolutly foren, but you know that they are the same species. Just wanted to throw that idea into the air.

Sincerely,

Brandon
 
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