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Please help, Phoneutria or very aggressive tropical spider infestation in my home

Discussion in 'Other Spiders & Arachnids' started by Beef queen, Sep 19, 2018.

  1. Beef queen

    Beef queen Arachnopeon

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  2. Sarkhan42

    Sarkhan42 Arachnodemon

    Neither... looks Neoscona to me, possibly arabesca. Harmless, even beneficial.

    edit: agree with larinioides
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2018
  3. dangerforceidle

    dangerforceidle Arachnodemon Active Member

    It's an orb weaver for sure, likely genus Larinioides.
     
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  4. NYAN

    NYAN Arachnoking Active Member

    CA
    You’re in Canada. Phoneutria live in south and Central America. The spider in your photo is neither aggressive nor tropical in nature. As @dangerforceidle mentioned, it’s probably an orb weaver in the genus larinioides. You mentioned that they are ‘infesting your house.’ Could you please explain how?
     
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  5. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnoprince

    That is pretty much the exact opposite of a Phoneutria. What you have is harmless, slow and spins orb webs, also looks pretty darn small.
     
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  6. JoP

    JoP Arachnosquire

    @Beef queen I'm genuinely curious, when you said that the spider was "very aggressive," what did you mean? I've never seen these guys show even the slightest sign of aggression (other than toward their prey, I guess).
     
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  7. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnoprince

    Are these guys even capable of threat postures?
     
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  8. JoP

    JoP Arachnosquire

    I doubt it. I've handled them before with no problems, and I've only ever seen them flee from stimuli, even when taken out of their webs. That's why I'm so curious, haha.
     
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  9. NYAN

    NYAN Arachnoking Active Member

    CA
    I’ve noticed that people will interpret normal spider behavior as being aggressive. Such examples include: running in your direction by chance or moving their front legs around.
     
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  10. SonsofArachne

    SonsofArachne Arachnoangel Active Member

    That's what I was going to say - probably moved in the op's direction.
     
  11. The Snark

    The Snark Dumpster Fire of the Gods Old Timer

    Probably mistook how industrious those tykes are when web building. Busy busy busy.
     
  12. They are nature's insecticides, no harm having them around. Except for occasionally bumping into their webs. :p
     
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  13. SonsofArachne

    SonsofArachne Arachnoangel Active Member

    Notice the op hasn't made one comment since they started this thread? I'm starting to wonder if this a troll.

    Why would someone who knew the word Phoneutria mistake a orb weaver for one?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 20, 2018
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  14. Beef queen

    Beef queen Arachnopeon

    C724339E-B0E9-480F-A5B6-335250F18D63.jpeg C724339E-B0E9-480F-A5B6-335250F18D63.jpeg 207A22DD-B39A-4671-A842-A08C9458B60B.jpeg BE94AB44-7789-4838-960E-A7D1C13BDC46.jpeg Can anyone please I’d these spiders for me and tell me what to do ?
    Me and my son have been having bad seizures and neurological problems for over a year and no doctors can figure it out . Just noticed this year the home is infested with these spiders . They only come out at night and are very aggressive, viscous and I believe we keep getting bit .
    theye uesto be orb weavers , but not anymore. I have lived in South American countries a month a year for 20 years , only time I saw aggressive spiders like this in Venezuela at my friends place . They were poor but showed me how they stand on the back legs and attack and said never to touch one .my son seen one at night , he had to pee and there was a huge one on the floor going for my dog queen . He tried to kill it and it stood on back legs and went for him . I killed it , but it’s body was like leather boot. It’s head like a brick .
    I took a closer look at the spiders outside. They are in the siding , haven’t seen any webs like the orb weavers as these spiders have killed off all other spiders . I will take a video at night and post it . My friend trapped some and got bit by a small one and felt like someone standing on his chest , got s hard on , sorry but true , and was so dizzy he called ambulance. The ones he caught looked different but all had the same mark underneath. So I’m wondering if they just in different stages of life . There was a huge one in basement that a contractor killed and he left home so quick and won’t cone back .i got bit by a small one that I trapped , my whole hand blistered . When I’m a big container they ripped one spider apart and we’re all doing that stance hunched on 4 back legs with 4 legs sticking straight up , 2 on each side . Some have red looking hairy mandibles? I live in country, seen lotsa spiders but not like this . They will hand a web off their but and go right for you . They come out at night and seem to hunt walking on the siding of my home and plants around the property. I have many tropical plants that I’ve had for many years , some 20 years old & have a green house /sun room all plants come in side in winter. Like I said I thought they orbs at first too , I keep those around cause they good for bugs on my plants but the orbs body could be squished easy , these body like a old leather boot . I’ll take better photos at night . They killed all the orb and any other spider around.
    Would it be possible for s phoneutria to breed with a big orb and create a sub species?
    I’m not a big spider person but do know a lot about parasites and microbiology. I was thinking of looking at the mouth under microscope but don’t know if I wanna risk getting the toxin on me that blistered my hand .
    It’s the viscousness , most spiders that I’ve seen try n get away if disturbed, not these ones . And yes I live in Canada but my home is over 100 years old and it be easy for them to get in and hide . There were almost no spiders last year which I found strange , but these things killed them all .
    I realize that female arachnids kill the male after breeding but there are no other spiders now . Only this breed that hunt at night , attack if disturbed , leave horrible blisters and they’re are thousands, it’s gonna get cold and they will come in . But it’s been + 40 almost all summer here , the river dried up and people here never seen that . So it’s not even been very cold the last few winters.
    These things seem dangerous.
    The venom from tiny one made a quarter size blister on my friend . He thought it was regular spiders too till I showed him what they do and how they attack . He’s from the bush and s hunter and sees big spiders and stuff like that all the time and he never seen anything like these .
     

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  15. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnoprince

    Again, those are orb weavers, completely harmless. It would not even be possible for a Phonuetria to travel from south America to Canada, Canada would not exactly be the most hospitable environment for them anyway and after more than a few months in the wild they all would have died (assuming there was more than one.) I think you actually just described the plot of the movie Arachnophobia. Also, a species breeding with a different species would not create a subspecies, it makes a hybrid. Besides, the spiders you posted pictures of are too genetically different from Phobuetria to produce offspring, the size different alone would probably end with the orb weavers dead during a mating attempt.
     
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  16. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX ArachnoGod Active Member

    If those were really Phoneutria spiders (such P.nigriventer) you wouldn't had been here typing :)

    Don't worry... the spider/s of your pics are (venom potency talking) a nothing, no big deal.
    Obviously, no matter how much weak is the venom potency, a bite is never an amazing experience, I mean, isn't exactly like returning home from work and find Katrina Bowden naked in the bed :pompous:
     
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  17. antinous

    antinous Pamphopharaoh

    Like others have said, those are harmless orb weavers and they’re not responsible for you or your sons neurological problems. If it was a Phoneutria, you would’ve known. Even in South America bites aren’t exactly common and they wouldn’t be able to survive in Canada whatsoever.

    And no, they can’t breed with orb weavers, two completely different genera.
     
  18. Beef queen

    Beef queen Arachnopeon

    Like I said , I’ll take another video at night ,
    I’m not afraid of spiders but I am of these and so is anyone I showed it too . The paramedics said that it possible but they didn’t know where to take it . They suggest a exterminator right away . The egg sacs r not like other spiders, they more like a cocoon with tiny spiders that stay in there for awhile. My photos I posted were not good . I will do more tonight.
    They have found tiger Miskito in the ministry traps so it possible that tropical things can very well survive here .
    Especially if they get in in winter. I have a lot of rooms that r closed off , voids in the home if you will that was like this when I bought it . Don’t even wanna know what’s inside.
    The attic is like s loft and I see light from a roof corner , so they could very well be inside as the one that was headed for my French bulldog was in the bedroom. The dogs have had huge blisters the size of my hand & sometimes wake up screaming. Been to vet many times and nothing wrong w dogs , she said it could very well be the spiders and to exterminate also .
    I’ll post another video tonight but sometimes I have problems w service but after u see the spiders alive then you will see what I mean , they all have the same mark on underside regardless of size & colour . And it’s the mark underneath and the viscous ness that makes me wonder what they really are . There’s no way all different types of spider would have the same mark .

    I just noticed these things recently and somthing is not right .

    What r some identifying features of venomous spiders?
    And why do they do that leg thing and attack ?
    And they even tear each other apart when put together.
    Do all spiders leave huge blisters and give a guy a bone for hrs? That’s why the paramedics were alarmed. Then they seen the spiders alive on the home siding . They didn’t wanna get near the things .
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 20, 2018
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  19. antinous

    antinous Pamphopharaoh

    Doctors/Paramedics aren’t always the most reliable when it comes to IDing spiders or snakes and they usually jump the gun and say that you should remove them all, even if they are harmless. Tropical species can not survive in Canada, sure maybe the summer, but not through the winter. They require a lot of heat and humidity, which during the winter is pretty hard to find.

    Nope, not all spiders do. And spiders ‘tear each other apart’ because they’re not always communal. The leg thing is a display so they don’t have to bite and expend unnecessary energy, no spider is going to bite you for no reason.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 20, 2018
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  20. Beef queen

    Beef queen Arachnopeon

    I don’t wanna kill them for nothing , I don’t like killing anything alive but they r nasty things , if after the video I post you still think orbs then why so aggressive ? I thought orbs harmless and actually good to rid home of bugs .

    I gotta wait for night time though so I post it tonight
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 20, 2018
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