"Playing" w/G. Rosea ? Good/Bad idea?

abstract

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 25, 2003
Messages
748
Okay - here's a ?

I've got a rosie, that I like to show off for my friends when they come over. Sometimes, it sits in it's hide and is barely visible. I can however take a bit of cellophane (like that that would be ripped off the top of a cigarette pack), and brush its legs with it. It reacts by chasing after the cellophane (not as quick as when killing a cricket), and lifts its legs up like it's trying to eat it.

I've gotten it to follow the cellophane when walking around on my table also. I've seen it try to bite it once, but stops as soon as it "realizes" that the plastic piece isn't prey. However, if I move it again, it will follow!

Question is, is "playing" with my spider like this bad for it? She doesn't seem to get stressed - and will continue walking around after I have removed the cellophane.

Does anybody else do anything similar to this w/their spiders, and if so, is there something else that would be good to use than a bit of cellophane?
:?
 

Godzilla2000

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 14, 2003
Messages
947
I generally leave my Rosehair alone. She hates any physical contact whatsoever. Whenever I'm checking up on her water or making adjustments to her living space she runs away scared. I try to keep involvement with my Rosehair to the bare minimum since I don't want to stress her out too much, especially during a premininent molt. But my Pink Zebra Beauty on the other hand loves as much attention as I can give her. So much so that she sometimes refuses to let go of her position on my palm and wrist.
 

MizM

Arachnoprincess
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 13, 2003
Messages
4,918
My G. rosea LOVES to be held. When I put my hand in front of her, she climbs right up!!!
 

Godzilla2000

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 14, 2003
Messages
947
That's how my Pink Zebra Beauty is. I think one reason why my Rosehair hates contact is because she was bought at a local petstore and was pestered by kids trying to reach in and grab her while the owners backs were turned.
 

Infinity

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 23, 2002
Messages
33
I wouldn't recommend prodding at your rose hair for the amusement of your friends. This can not only stress the animal, I would think that it will also make her more likely to strike at you.

I handle many of my rose hairs regularly, but this is limited to opening the enclosure and allowing them to walk out onto my hand. "Playing" with them in the manner that you suggest is uncalled for.
 

MizM

Arachnoprincess
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 13, 2003
Messages
4,918
It doesn't sound like stress to me if the T is FOLLOWING the cellophane. If you get a threat reaction or if the T runs away, I would think that is a stressful situation.:?
 

Tangled WWWeb

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 4, 2002
Messages
706
It's probably not a big deal, but I wouldn't do it. It seems to me (unless I have misunderstood your post) that you are provoking a feeding response without giving it any food. This may, or may not be stressful. I'm not sure that anyone can discern every visible sign of stress in tarantulas. To assume that because it doesn't appear bothered by it may be a bit presumptuous.

John
 

abstract

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 25, 2003
Messages
748
I agree with you terridumonte......Once again, I'm no expert, but I have seen him react to different stimuli by pulling his legs in close, and not responding to movement. This doesn't happen as a result of the cellophane thing, but when I sometimes open his enclosure to water, or clean. Sometimes he's not interested in prey also, and it provokes a similar reaction.

Another good point is that he could strike at me, but I question whether that would be the case. It really is interesting though - his reaction to the cellophane is a lot different than to live food - he moves a lot slower and doesn't really bite it; just seems to want to touch it.

Just also to clear up possible charges of arachnid abuse, I don't taunt him for others amusement - I will just brush his legs - if he looks stressed or doesn't follow - I let him be.
 

Mister Internet

Big Meanie Doo Doo Head :)
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 5, 2002
Messages
1,408
*trying to avoid crapping on yet another new hobbyist's anthropomorphic glee*

I would recommend against it. If you only agree with people who agree with you, there's not much point in asking for advice. The simple fact is, a Rosie doesn't LOVE anything. It's an arachnid, it's incapable of love, affection, happiness, sadness, or curiosity. The behavior you are describing is not open to interpretation... it is a feeding response or defensive response... that being said, it's none of our business what you do with your inverts... and I'll admit to prodding my centipedes to stir them from lethargy to see if they're still healthy or to clean a water bowl they may be laying on... but I still only do it when necessary.

So, if you want to call it "playing", you may... but the rosie isn't getting nearly as much out of it as you, I can guarantee that much. :)
 

Godzilla2000

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 14, 2003
Messages
947
Originally posted by Mister Internet
*trying to avoid crapping on yet another new hobbyist's anthropomorphic glee*

I would recommend against it. If you only agree with people who agree with you, there's not much point in asking for advice. The simple fact is, a Rosie doesn't LOVE anything. It's an arachnid, it's incapable of love, affection, happiness, sadness, or curiosity. The behavior you are describing is not open to interpretation... it is a feeding response or defensive response... that being said, it's none of our business what you do with your inverts... and I'll admit to prodding my centipedes to stir them from lethargy to see if they're still healthy or to clean a water bowl they may be laying on... but I still only do it when necessary.

So, if you want to call it "playing", you may... but the rosie isn't getting nearly as much out of it as you, I can guarantee that much. :)
Well I agree partly with you. Of course my Rosehair flees the minute I open the tank lid and make any noises. But I do not think that they don't have some simple forms of emotions. From my experience they do feel emotions. It's not like they can verbally communicate it like we can. But they physically manifest their emotions with body posture and movement.
 
Top