Pinheads

aphono

Arachnobaron
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Mar 11, 2017
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I have three .5 slings and one 4 inch chalcodes. Going to look at and get a few more slings later this week. The only pinheads I can find locally are crickets- one source is 5 minutes away. Is this okay until they are big enough for dubias?

I noticed feeding roaches is popular in the hobby and the crickets do smell a bit.. so I was wondering if there is a good feeder roach species besides lateralis that would produce pinheads for the slings... or would this be unnecessarily over complicating things with a collection of say, 6-10 slings?
 

sdsnybny

Arachnogeek
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With a source for pinheads only 5 min away I would just buy what I needed to feed the slings each time. i feed tiny slings every 3-5 days so it wouldn't be a problem to stop and get them for 6-10 slings
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Pinheads (I/We call those, in Italy, micro crickets) are perfect for little slings. And btw I always (95%) offered those to my slings, alive, not even pre-killed :-s

As for what's best/more popular between crickets, roaches and God know else, it's a never ending debate just like for substrate.

My opinion? To vary the diet is advised. I always offered roaches and crickets to my arachnid/inverts, sometimes (rarely, ain't a fan) worms.

I have noticed btw that certain arboreals are choosy with roaches. Def. I prefer crickets, however, for T's.

Pinheads, Pinheads :kiss:

 

Hellblazer

Arachnosquire
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May 13, 2016
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Newborn dubia nymphs are as small as a pinhead cricket. That's mostly what I use for my smallest slings. I just crush their heads before I put them in.
 

DrowsyLids

Arachnosquire
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Dec 4, 2016
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Pinhead crickets might smell a little but even if you're not adamant about cleaning up uneaten prey and boli the T will likely be rehoused before it becomes a big issue. For the slings, that is. I'd still suggest cleaning up the ones that are easily reachable.
 

aphono

Arachnobaron
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Mar 11, 2017
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Thanks for all the responses! I will keep it simple and just buy cricket pinheads locally until they are bigger then try for variety- crickets, dubia..
 

bryverine

Arachnoangel
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Apr 18, 2012
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I've only had a couple small ones, but they will usually scavenge larger dead prey when they're tiny.

You could also do the drumstick method with a juicy cricket leg. :astonished:
 

aphono

Arachnobaron
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Mar 11, 2017
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I've only had a couple small ones, but they will usually scavenge larger dead prey when they're tiny.

You could also do the drumstick method with a juicy cricket leg. :astonished:
Might do this after setting the cage up as a renaissance or county fair... ;)

It surprises me they can accept prekilled prey. I'd always thought they depended on prey movement to trigger capture and feeding...

btw day four of 8 med-large crickets in a container stinks unbelievably bad! Had to move it to the second bedroom from the living room(where the tarantulas are).. is there something to reduce the stink? some bedding or that's just the way they are?
 

bryverine

Arachnoangel
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Might do this after setting the cage up as a renaissance or county fair... ;)

It surprises me they can accept prekilled prey. I'd always thought they depended on prey movement to trigger capture and feeding...

btw day four of 8 med-large crickets in a container stinks unbelievably bad! Had to move it to the second bedroom from the living room(where the tarantulas are).. is there something to reduce the stink? some bedding or that's just the way they are?
Yeah, get dubia. :p

What are you feeding them?
 

grayzone

Arachnoking
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Pin heads, or large cricket parts work best for tiny slings. You can feed a sling a large cricket leg or body part with no problem.
I never offer roaches to ts until theyre larger
 

Spidermolt

Arachnoknight
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May 29, 2015
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Newborn dubia nymphs are as small as a pinhead cricket. That's mostly what I use for my smallest slings. I just crush their heads before I put them in.
Ah, so newborn dubias are the size of small (pinhead) crickets that you usually buy from any pet store BUT... if you actually breed crickets you will notice that their newborns are indeed pinhead sized and are much smaller than a dubias nymph.
 

Hellblazer

Arachnosquire
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May 13, 2016
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Ah, so newborn dubias are the size of small (pinhead) crickets that you usually buy from any pet store BUT... if you actually breed crickets you will notice that their newborns are indeed pinhead sized and are much smaller than a dubias nymph.
I've never needed them smaller than this though, especially if they're prekilled.
IMG_1392.JPG
 

aphono

Arachnobaron
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Mar 11, 2017
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That's true, I was just pointing out that newborn crickets are smaller but yeah a prekilled dubia that size is good for any size sling.
Good to know. if I ever happen across a source for that size, will be all over it for sure.. the crickets are proving to be quite smelly and not the easiest thing to take care of- some have dropped dead and one of the large crickets turned blackish.. was still alive but still tossed it away just to be sure. Was that a sign of something?
 

aphono

Arachnobaron
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Yeah, get dubia. :p

What are you feeding them?
:happy: I am getting why so many hate crickets! Will be sure to try dubias as soon as possible.

So far just pinhead crickets for the slings and larger crickets for the juvenile. Had them for 2 or 3 wks by now. They all have been excellent eaters, except the A. eutylenum sling refused crickets the day before and then yesterday it defensively bit then did the kicking motion at the cricket so I took it out immediately. Wonder if it is in premolt, abdomen looked pretty long but it doesn;t look any darker than usual. Going to wait about a week before trying to feed it again just to be sure.

What do you feed yours?
 

D Sherlod

Arachnoknight
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Dec 30, 2016
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Crickets molt just like T's do. The darker they are the closer to molting is my experience.
 

aphono

Arachnobaron
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Mar 11, 2017
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462
Kinda wondered about that, it looked like how a banana gets a black spot- patchy black on abdomen, it looked rather nasty. I'll look at them again and see if that might have been just a premolt feature.. in that case.. classic newbie mistake lol
 
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