Pill Millipedes, the possibility of raising them in captivity?

Andee

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jul 1, 2013
Messages
402
So I have been researching beetles, and pill millipedes have always been that species that I would love to have but never will because of the issues they have surviving in captivity (talking about the giant species across the way from the states). But I am wondering what people have done to try and make them survive? I have read about certain species of beetles needing kinshi to help them provide good bacteria in their gut in many ways and help them break down their food... Well has anyone actually tried this with pill millipedes, and actually making a species specific one? If not I would be willing to try after I learn to make a simpler kinshi for just easier stag beetles....? I wouldn't touch the giant emerald species unless it went really well with the tanzanian species. But in my opinion, if you get wood geared to where they come from, and innoculate with mushrooms that they would likely eat where they are from... well if no one has tried it I don't see why it might not work to help jump start the bacteria in their stomachs again. It's just like providing probiotics/prebiotics for us.
 

scorps

Arachnosquire
Joined
May 22, 2011
Messages
134
If you're referring to pill bugs, then yes people raise/breed them a lot. People i think mostly use them for waste disposal in cages with lots of organic bits.
 

Andee

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jul 1, 2013
Messages
402
No I am talking about pill millipedes. The ones that no one has been able to get breed or stay alive passed like a few years due to starvation issues. They are unable to digest what they eat when they do eat so they end up starving to death even when eating.
 

Marika

Arachnolord
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
650
At least Arthrosphaera cf. brandtii, Rhopalomeris carnifex and Glomeris spp. have been bred in captivity. I keep A. cf. brandtii, I've had one for over 1,5 years and another for about a year now. I did order several of them, but the others died shortly after I had received them. They seem to be sensitive to shipping stress. I keep my brandtii the same way I keep my other pedes: at room temp and offer them decaying leaves and wood, also fresh food, but I don't know if they eat it. At first I kept them in their own enclosure, but they've been in a communal set-up with other species for a year now, and I haven't noticed any issues. I haven't seen any babies, but saw some mating behavior once.
 

Andee

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jul 1, 2013
Messages
402
I think I would try something like trying a really specific kinshi to what they would have near them as far as woods and muchrooms to see if I could their feeding behavior more normal and also maybe some breeding behavior. Of course I definitely won't dive into this until I confident in my own abilities at making normal kinshis from the woods over here. I think I order some wood (either shavings or not) from africa for the Tanzanian variety and I have already looked up species of mushrooms that might work. But I don't see myself doing it for at least a few years. I am not even sure where I could order them in the US. I know the shipping could easily be hard on them and if I could I would order cooling packs with them. (I also would order a larger group, probably around 8-10 just to make sure I have a cushion in case some don't do well with the shipping) I mean I know if they honestly don't do well in captivity with me I will never try it again unless it is a local species. But I think the kinshi might help from what I have researched into it, beetles, and the pill millipedes. I also would be keeping in the garage with my other insects like since they seem to like colder temps, I would not use a heating element at all, and if I had a heatwave I would do what I do with a montane chameleons and put a ice pack ontop of the screen on their enclosure, it cools off an enclosure very well, and kind of does a cool humidity affect.
 

Andee

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jul 1, 2013
Messages
402
I will be definitely getting permits down the road, and won't be keeping them for several years, and will definitely have a permit before then. But I am not in any rush to start keeping them since they are so sensitive. I want to make sure I can get it right the first time I get my first group. I don't want needless dying if I can help it. If I see some success I will know where I need to go. I am so hopeful. But not in any rush. They are definitely a dream at the moment. And I want to do at least a year or more of research before I even think of getting them.
 

Andee

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jul 1, 2013
Messages
402
Thanks sooooo much for the link btw! I have been looking for something that detailed on that specific thing for a while (honestly some of the links I have clicked from the website that I thought would help were completely useless and I was very confused by the end of it all XD) so it's nice to have it. Need to go over it in the morning <3
 

SlugPod

Arachnoknight
Joined
Sep 28, 2015
Messages
193
It's almost (if not completely) impossible to get a permit currently unless you work with or at some kind of facility, such as a museum or zoo.
A hobby keeper can't really get a permit to import and keep millipedes (among other species).
 

Andee

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jul 1, 2013
Messages
402
If I can't find a way around it within the rules I will see if I can find a zoo around here who will kind of help me out/take me on... I know a couple of them. Might be able to help me out. Even if I can help with conservation! THAT would be amazing ^^ (such a dream XD)
 

mickiem

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2016
Messages
1,529
If I can't find a way around it within the rules I will see if I can find a zoo around here who will kind of help me out/take me on... I know a couple of them. Might be able to help me out. Even if I can help with conservation! THAT would be amazing ^^ (such a dream XD)
I hope you can make it happen. The pet industry is such a drain on some species, but I think it's important to learn about and understand these. And pets are important for our well being. We just have to find a sensible balance that will allow both. You have a good attitude.
 
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