Pill millipede id

The invertabrate

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
57
I know you want to sell these but I really can't pay 210 dollars for millipedes even though they are rare, the scarlet millipede isn't something that I'm not looking for.But thank you for being a good person.
 

Millipedematt

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 16, 2017
Messages
100
I know you want to sell these but I really can't pay 210 dollars for millipedes even though they are rare, the scarlet millipede isn't something that I'm not looking for.But thank you for being a good person.
You would need a permit in order to buy non Florida natives species of millipedes (like these stunning specimen) feel free to message me i can hook you up with the info. Also @benjaminfrogs could these possibly Castanotherium sp. or maybe Globotherium sp. and have you ever held one to try to get an up close pic?
 

The invertabrate

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
57
You would need a permit in order to buy non Florida natives species of millipedes (like these stunning specimen) feel free to message me i can hook you up with the info. Also @benjaminfrogs could these possibly Castanotherium sp. or maybe Globotherium sp. and have you ever held one to try to get an up close pic?
Thanks for letting me know!
 

LawnShrimp

Arachnoangel
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
908
I am interested in them. how you breed them?
You don't.

Every attempt to breed pill millipedes has failed, with adults dying in a few years at best and in a few days at worst. A few clutches of hatchlings have been produced from a single group of A. brandtii, which all died due to nematodes. They were kept in a refrigerated, insulated, custom-designed box, provided with wood, moss, and leaves and still all died. The German breeder who attempted this has since given up.

Pillipedes are very sensitive to temperature and environment changes and shipping often kills them. If they do arrive intact they starve to death because of an unknown reason, most likely essential gut bacteria dying off due to temperature or lack of a special algae or fungus found in their habitat. See this thread and this one for more information but basically the only information to be found on Arachnoboards about pill millipedes is the same: all breeding attempts have failed and they are impossible to keep alive for more than a year.

Buying pill millipedes is also hard and illegal in the U.S., since the regulations passed in 2005 made all millipede imports illegal and there are no captive bred specimens in the U.S. at the time. While it is possible to obtain them from other countries, the paperwork, shipping cost, permit costs, and total cost of the millipedes is not worth it for a creature that dies in a few months on average. Some people are willing to take chances like the OP here but unless you have the same kind of access to them as he does and are willing to pay a significant price, I say wait until there has been a clearly established breeding population so you don't end up with an expensive failure.

This is a new species to captivity though, and may end up begin the one that survives in captivity. The results in this thread are quite promising but for now, we can only wait and see.
 
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