Pig eating molt

To remove, or not to remove the molt

  • Remove it

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Leave it be

    Votes: 2 25.0%
  • Either is fine, as long as you don't disturb the T!

    Votes: 6 75.0%

  • Total voters
    8

justanotherTkeeper

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2020
Messages
67
So earlier today, I found Pig, my A. geniculata, on his back preparing to molt. Finally, I thought to myself (I'd been waiting, knowing he was due to molt any day now), and I continued about my day. Later, I took another peek and saw that he was upright and had his molt in his fangs.

Now, I've heard of this happening before, but it's never happened in my care until now - mostly because I will usually watch my T's like a hawk, lurking while they molt, so I can squirrel the shed exoskeleton away ASAP (making sure the T is clear first, so as to not cause injury) to try and sex the molt. But I already know Pig is a male, so this time, I was just, Eh, whatever.

I know there have been some posts regarding T's munching their fresh molt, but the ones I read are from some years ago. Are there any new or rock-solid explanations of why tarantulas do this? Is it recommended to leave the molt for T's to do this? Are the soft fangs at risk of injury being used so suddenly after molting?
 

Jess S

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
355
I've never heard of a t damaging its fangs on a moult. The ones who damage or lose fangs seem to happen during the actual moulting process.

Some moults that happen deep in burrows I haven't removed until either they bring it up months later, or they get rehoused. So they had ample time to wreck their fangs on them before hardening, and it never happened.

They seem to use their fangs more to manipulate the moult nearer to their mouths to get at the moisture (ewww) and moults being delicate, legs fall off and abdomen area gets pierced and shredded.
 

Liquifin

Arachnoprince
Arachnosupporter
Joined
May 30, 2017
Messages
1,454
Fangs from previous molt stuck on T.? Well that has currently happened to me with my H. crassipes sling as one of its old fang from the molt is still hanging halfway of one of its fresh fang. It still eats, so I have hope it'll shed out of it its next molt.

But yea, 70%-90% of the time, I wouldn't care less about the molt, because I deal with so many molts in a week or month that I don't really bother with sexing unless for breeding.
 

justanotherTkeeper

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2020
Messages
67
Fangs from previous molt stuck on T.?
Not stuck. Sorry, I probably could have worded that better.

He was munching on the molt, as if it were a prey item.

They seem to use their fangs more to manipulate the moult nearer to their mouths to get at the moisture (ewww) and moults being delicate, legs fall off and abdomen area gets pierced and shredded.
Thanks for the helpful info! Definitely ewww, but tarantula will tarantula... I guess lol...
 

Jess S

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
355
@justanotherTkeeper funnily enough my 1.5" genic moulted today. I rehoused it just a couple days ago. Felt bad about that because I wouldn't normally mess with a t so heavy in premoult. But as the little guy runs straight into the hide when I lift the lid, I hadn't seen how dark it's abdomen was until I'd already started with the rehousing. Nice to look in on it today and see that it's moulted and is looking really pretty.
 

justanotherTkeeper

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2020
Messages
67
@justanotherTkeeper funnily enough my 1.5" genic moulted today. I rehoused it just a couple days ago. Felt bad about that because I wouldn't normally mess with a t so heavy in premoult. But as the little guy runs straight into the hide when I lift the lid, I hadn't seen how dark it's abdomen was until I'd already started with the rehousing. Nice to look in on it today and see that it's moulted and is looking really pretty.
Neat coincidence! Because Pig destroyed the molt, I couldn't get an accurate DLS, but last time it was 2.5", so I'm guessing he's approx 3 - 3.5" now, considering how fast genics grow, especially males. Looking forward to seeing how massive and leggy this guy will be
 

Arachnoenthusiast

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2020
Messages
228
So earlier today, I found Pig, my A. geniculata, on his back preparing to molt. Finally, I thought to myself (I'd been waiting, knowing he was due to molt any day now), and I continued about my day. Later, I took another peek and saw that he was upright and had his molt in his fangs.

Now, I've heard of this happening before, but it's never happened in my care until now - mostly because I will usually watch my T's like a hawk, lurking while they molt, so I can squirrel the shed exoskeleton away ASAP (making sure the T is clear first, so as to not cause injury) to try and sex the molt. But I already know Pig is a male, so this time, I was just, Eh, whatever.

I know there have been some posts regarding T's munching their fresh molt, but the ones I read are from some years ago. Are there any new or rock-solid explanations of why tarantulas do this? Is it recommended to leave the molt for T's to do this? Are the soft fangs at risk of injury being used so suddenly after molting?
It's my understanding that they will get moisture from the molt to aid in rehydration
 
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