Phormictopus canceroides

KezyGLA

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It is a heavy built and fairly defensive tarantula. I don't know if there is a specific ladder to be speaking about.

I would say it is similar in nature to Lasiodora parahybana. Well not far off it. A bit more defensive so maybe if tou have experience with that species?
 

Matttoadman

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Well people seem adiment that beginners should start with 3-4 specific species and then step up the ladder to more advanced species.
 

magicmed

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I know the ladder you're referring to, I'm fairly certain p. Cancerides rests around the second "step" area. I could be wrong but I'm fairly confident that anyone with a bit of experience with T's and a responsible mindset can take one on.

I'd put them around the same keeping "difficulty" as nhandu coloratovilosus? Someone may very well correct me, I've no personal experience with them.
 

WeightedAbyss75

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They are easy to care for, but VERY aggresive (at least in every video I've seen them in). IF you're going by the ladder, I'd say it's a high 2 out of 3. Only because of the nature of the T.
 

KezyGLA

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Everyone has an opinion on this.

I am one of the people who believes people should get what they want. Don't get a T (or several) that youre not interested in because others tell you. People should be advising not telling. I find it annoying. I believe if you properly research the T you want in depth, and are willing to accept the risks of what might happen (shouldn't happen if the right precautions are taken when dealing with said T) then you should be fine.

I would however advise people to get at least one feisty NW before delving into OW, but I wouldn't tell them to.

I understand why I get into conflicts when I mention this. There are of course idiotic people out there that would buy an OW without doing the proper research then they get tagged. Shame on them for not preparing.

I just don't think spending money and time on several species you may not even be interested in would not make the hobby appealing to some individuals.

Tarantulas are wild animals and will defend theirselves if threatened. The Ts arent out to get you, they are just doing what they need to in order to protect theirselves.

Some end up with a Rosie as a first T. Some people even recommend them but they can be very defensive and have quite the nasty bite.

Phormictopus is generally not a crazy defensive genus, although there will always be individuals in any genus that are an exception to the norm. I own a few and they like to kick. I have still to see a threat pose from them.

This is just my 2 cents
 

WeightedAbyss75

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They are easy to care for, but VERY aggresive (at least in every video I've seen them in). IF you're going by the ladder, I'd say it's a high 2 out of 3. Only because of the nature of the T. I think almost any person with a good head on their shoulders can take on 80% of the T's in the hobby, but that is just me. If, OP, you really wanted it as a first T, then do some research and get a sling. You can get used to the temperment amd humidity that way :D
 

KezyGLA

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They are easy to care for, but VERY aggresive (at least in every video I've seen them in). IF you're going by the ladder, I'd say it's a high 2 out of 3. Only because of the nature of the T.
By any chance have you seen vids on youtube of them being 'aggresive'?

I have seen a couple but its only when idiots go poking at them. I would be pissed too if it was me.
 

Matttoadman

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well I do understand that beginners(especially younger individuals or inexperienced pet people, or those to wreck less and immature) should avoid aggressive species. No help from the pet stores. But there is a point where age and animal experiance can allow you to advance a bit quicker. I could be wrong. Personally I deal with dangerous inverts daily, hornets, honey bees, brown recluse, etc.. Sorry for the common names.
 

KezyGLA

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Sorry my english isnt great and I worded that wrong. I mean some people recomend G. rosea/porteri as a first T. I have owned 2 and both have been more defensive than any of my Phormictopus.

The whole species ladder completely depends on the person wanting a new T. If they feel ready to care for that sp. after researching it properly then they should go ahead.
 

Venom1080

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. If they feel ready to care for that sp. after researching it properly then they should go ahead.
i felt ready for a H mac after a hour or so of research 5 years ago. i def was not. check out my signature. thats all i have to say on this.
 

KezyGLA

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i felt ready for a H mac after a hour or so of research 5 years ago. i def was not. check out my signature. thats all i have to say on this.
Thinking about it for an hour isnt exactly in depth reaserch. You may not have been ready for it. That doesn't mean others arent.
 

KezyGLA

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I have wanted to get an H. mac for half a decade. I still don't have one because I did my research and feel I am still not ready for the angry snowflake.
 

EulersK

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This is a very defensive species, but not difficult to deal with at all. They're slow and stand their ground rather than running. They have negligible venom, so you don't really need to worry about that. I love this species, I'd say it's an early intermediate in terms of experience. Just keep your fingers out of there!
 

Venom1080

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Thinking about it for an hour isnt exactly in depth reaserch. You may not have been ready for it. That doesn't mean others arent.
what is in depth research in your opinion? i looked up care, where it was from, read a bunch of random caresheets, watched vids, etc. etc. theres not much else to know, thats where experience comes in. research cant fully prepare you for the real thing.
 

Matttoadman

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Yeah I think t's are look but don't touch. Now My Elliptorhina javanica and Eublaberus "pantanal" on the other hand....
 

KezyGLA

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This is a very defensive species, but not difficult to deal with at all. They're slow and stand their ground rather than running. They have negligible venom, so you don't really need to worry about that. I love this species, I'd say it's an early intermediate in terms of experience. Just keep your fingers out of there!
I have yet to see the very defensive side of mine then. All the factors you mention I agree with. My auratus is skittish as is one of my platus. My other platus and my cautus stand their ground and move towards me when opening enclosures but I aint had a pose as such yet.
 

KezyGLA

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what is in depth research in your opinion? i looked up care, where it was from, read a bunch of random caresheets, watched vids, etc. etc. theres not much else to know, thats where experience comes in. research cant fully prepare you for the real thing.
Then I guess they shouldn't get the T they want because they may have to experience it?
 

Venom1080

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Then I guess they shouldn't get the T they want because they may have to experience it?
i mean experience with other Ts with similar habits/care, just not venom. i think everyone should own a Psalmopoeus before getting any OW arboreal, theyre very fast and usually pretty defensive. have a good sized one for 6 months, or raise one from a sling, and i think they are ready.
 
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