Phormictopus Cancerides care sheet

ahas

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
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Jun 11, 2007
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668
Hi guys,

Just wondering if you guys can give me some tips regarding this beautiful species. I' m thinking of getting one. {D

I just wanna know couple of things:

Temperament
Are they terrestrial/ arboreal?
How big do they get?....and other infos would be great.


thanks,

Fred
 

harrypei

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Oct 30, 2006
Messages
289
fairly aggressive...will bite but not much hair kicking, as per the two i have...

terrestrial

females get pretty large, like 8''+

keep the water dish filled and mist once in a while. they are pretty hardy guys.
 

RottweilExpress

Arachnoprince
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Apr 3, 2006
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This a seriously underrated tarantula. I love them. The males are gorgeous, some colormorph females are almost equally gorgeous. Do not be fooled though, the average female P. Cancerides is quite dull colorwise. They are midsized, sometimes ending up at 7-8 cm bodylength (15-18cm+ legspann).

They are aggressive feeders, always hungry and they have quite an attitude if you intrude on their territory. Simply awesome small killing machines even as slings.

They thrive in 25-28 degrees Celcius, and you can keep the container dry but they, imho, clearly prefer some moisture.

And yes, they are terrestrial, so do bring a hide and some 10 cm of substrate to bulldoze.
 

ahas

Arachnodemon
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Jun 11, 2007
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668
Cool, awesome guys. Thanks for the reply.

I guess they' re not for handling eh? Anyway, they' re purple colour right? Just wanted to make sure. :razz:
 

Vanisher

Arachnoking
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Oct 2, 2004
Messages
2,480
Hi guys,

Just wondering if you guys can give me some tips regarding this beautiful species. I' m thinking of getting one. {D

I just wanna know couple of things:

Temperament
Are they terrestrial/ arboreal?
How big do they get?....and other infos would be great.


thanks,

Fred
They are terrestrial spiders, and native to the West indies. They have been found both in burrows in the rainforests and in some drier arias, living under debris. I think they can reach up to 20 cm in legspan. These are very agressive spiders too, comparable to Pterinochilus sp. But temperament can change from one individual to another like in any other species! /Johan
 

Mallard

Arachnoknight
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Apr 16, 2007
Messages
176
when I brought mine home 2 months ago. She was actually quite docile one gentle tap and she moved into her new home. Never seen her threat posture during feeding or tank maitanence. I still wouldnt handle her though.
Jason
 

Sheazy

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Apr 19, 2007
Messages
155
Both of mine are fairly aggressive. They are still slings (1.75" & 2"), but both are extremely fast and agile T's. One runs out ready to attack every time I touch or move its habitat, the other one is always ready to eat, and launches at water drops while misting. Currently both are still the teal-blue color and I can't wait until I see what colors they will grow into. I gave both of mine large pieces of corkbark in their cages and they both decided to dig a shallow retreat, right near the edge. I keep mine around 76-80 degree's with a light misting a couple times a week.
 

RottweilExpress

Arachnoprince
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Apr 3, 2006
Messages
1,092
Cool, awesome guys. Thanks for the reply.

I guess they' re not for handling eh? Anyway, they' re purple colour right? Just wanted to make sure. :razz:
Well, I'd say no since there are no guarantees. My semi adult male is very nicely pink on the carapace though, but overall very dark otherwise. Dark femurs, and lighter lower part of the legs. All slings/ small juvies hold ashade of blue. And no, no handling.
 

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
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Feb 28, 2007
Messages
1,671
Hi guys,

Just wondering if you guys can give me some tips regarding this beautiful species. I' m thinking of getting one. {D

I just wanna know couple of things:

Temperament
Are they terrestrial/ arboreal?
How big do they get?....and other infos would be great.


thanks,

Fred


These guys are very easy to take care of. Give them substrate deep enough to burrow into and a water dish, they are terresterial. Room tempeture works just fine. The only time you'll see them is when they are hungry or after 100% post molt. More than likely they will molt within the confines of their burrow. they will more than likely run into their burrow than try to bite you. I think they get the average size so probably around 5 - 6 inches of course males are smaller. A lot of the previous post have said these guys are aggresive. Mines doesnt seem aggressive at all more nervous than anything. Do yall try to hold yours or something? how often do you feed them? maybe they are aggressive because they don't have enough room burrow and feel secure.
 

Mina

Arachnoking
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Oct 4, 2005
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I have 3, 2 slings and an immature male. The male is very gentle and is handleable. The slings are both good eaters, incredible hunters, and move almost faster than you can see them do it. I don't recommend handling this species because of general temperment and speed. Not all of them are teddy bears like my male.
They don't always get purple highlights either, in some cases it can be bronze to red as well.
 

Sheazy

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Apr 19, 2007
Messages
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The only time you'll see them is when they are hungry or after 100% post molt. More than likely they will molt within the confines of their burrow. they will more than likely run into their burrow than try to bite you. I think they get the average size so probably around 5 - 6 inches of course males are smaller. A lot of the previous post have said these guys are aggresive. Mines doesnt seem aggressive at all more nervous than anything. Do yall try to hold yours or something? how often do you feed them? maybe they are aggressive because they don't have enough room burrow and feel secure.
Actually, mine are visible almost 100% of the time. Both of mine sit right out in the open and are very quick to pounce on anything the touches ground in their space. I feed mine 5-6 small crickets a week with a mealworm thrown in as a snack (usually before the crickets so it is snatched quickly with no chance to burrow). Mine layed down a nice thick molting mat and molted in plain view...even pre-molt/post-molt they are constantly sitting there watching me. At 1.75" & 2" the aggressive tendencies are more cute than scary, but they will try to bite my chopsticks...and are VERY fast as mentioned before. From everything I have seen and read, these guys can reach 9" as mature adults. I dont try to hold mine, since they make me sweat when doing maintenance of transfers, and just based on their speed and lil threat displays to my chopsticks...I wouldn't recommend handling either. I think these are just a crazy, naturally aggressive species. Mine has around 6" of substrate to burrow into, as well as a couple hiding places...so I dont think that contributes to their high strung personalities. One of mine actually dug a burrow, filled it back in, and then dug it out again...so they have the option to dig and hide...mine just chose to dig a shallow retreat. Low enough to sit in and quickly shoot out of to snatch prey. Neither of them wait that long though...they run out and start chasing down crickets once they know they are there and usually end up with 3-4 in their fangs at once.
 

ahas

Arachnodemon
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668
Thanks for all the very good infos people. :)
 

Stan Schultz

Arachnoprince
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... females get pretty large, like 8''+ ...
But just so you understand - they are nowhere near as massive as an 8" T. blondi. In fact they sometimes are called "leggy."

Not bad spiders, actually. If yours seems to be too "pro-actively defensive" you'll soon learn to use the cage cover as a shield between your hand and the tarantula when you do normal cage maintenance.
 

Cthulhu1254

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 24, 2005
Messages
48
Well I'd heard the stories. Stuff about the P. cancerides being nothing short of a sociopathic little feind, but I'd had absolutely no problems with mine and so when I went to fix his water dish I just reached right in there and tried to pick it up. I thought "No, not little Wolfgang! He's harmless!" Moments later I repeated the attempt with chopsticks and a syringe. These guys do not mess around. I may have even gotten tagged because my finger sort of itchy-hurt afterwards, but it was probably just my imagination because it didn't hurt at all when he lunged at me.
 

Solucki

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
295
Perhaps my little guy didnt get the memo about being an angry little devil. He flicks hair a little and I've never seen any other defensiveness out of him. He's definitely an interior designer type. He has to fling his cocofiber all over. Dug a nice little burrow first day I got him and after his first rehousing. He's about 3" now.
 

spiderengineer

Arachnoangel
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Apr 22, 2012
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Tarac

Arachnolord
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Oct 6, 2011
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Mine are definitely mean critters. One of the few tarantulas I have seen in the wild, tropical montane in a dripping wet forest with those terrestrial hermit crabs that they sell in pet stores ( I posted a pic in the other inverts thread recently in fact). I like them, they're feisty and visible and hardy. I keep them like an average T without problem. Just keep your fingers clear ;-)
 

Tarantino andTs

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 10, 2013
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Thanks! they have some very suspicious reviews, even accusations of positive review padding by the owner! Ended up going with a Thai Zebra from Ken the bug guy though!
 
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