Phidipus Regius and Air Plants?

JonoPulchra

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 20, 2022
Messages
7
Hey all,

I'm planning to buy my first ever spider after learning so much about tarantulas and spiders for the past few years.
I'm planning to buy a Phidipus Regius (unsexed) and I would like to use live plants instead of artificial ones if possible. I'm thinking of using one or two air plants (Melanocrater Tricolor, Brachycaulos adbita and/or Ionantha Rubra) and wondering if these plants are a good option in general for Phidipus Regius husbandry? If not, what are some good recommendations for using live plants in unison with Phidipus Regius in your experience?

I've also been looking online, but I cannot determine if, when and how often the substrate may need to be changed? I know that tarantulas and spiders are generally clean critters, but it's bugging me that I cannot find a definitive answer specifically for Phidipus Regius! any definitive answers are sincerely grateful.

I refuse to buy my little critter until I have all the information I need to keep it happy. I also live in the South of the U.K if this is important for climate reasons.
 

Wolfram1

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
658
I've also been looking online, but I cannot determine if, when and how often the substrate may need to be changed? I know that tarantulas and spiders are generally clean critters, but it's bugging me that I cannot find a definitive answer specifically for Phidipus Regius! any definitive answers are sincerely grateful.
never,
not sure about your other questiins
 

Nicole C G

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2021
Messages
872
I've also been looking online, but I cannot determine if, when and how often the substrate may need to be changed? I know that tarantulas and spiders are generally clean critters, but it's bugging me that I cannot find a definitive answer specifically for Phidipus Regius! any definitive answers are sincerely grateful.
You need only pick out the eaten prey’s remains. (Unrelated but remember Phidippus regius needs high humidity)
 

regalpaws

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2022
Messages
137
One of my other hobbies is houseplants, I love em. All of my enclosures rn have live plants. Air plants are prob a really great option because they like to feed and gather water thru the humidity in the air, based on their natural habitats. I've kept some air plants in the past and depending on the type, its either preferable to mist or soak them. Bulbous based air plants do not like to be soaked as the water can get caught in between the leaves and cause the plant to rot. Either way, all air plants need to be tipped upside down to let excess water drain to prevent this.
Currently I keep Scindapsus treubii 'Sterling Silver', Epipremnum pinnatum 'Cebu Blue', and a fern that I forget the name of rn, along with various mosses. So anything similar to pothos plants is what I mainly keep, they do excellent for me.

As far as the substrate, I havent changed mine and I dont plan to. You can get springtails to add to your set up, they will keep everything clean. :)
Oh yeah, and so far I have used eco earth and mixed it with organic earthworm castings. The eco earth doesn't have any nutrients to keep the plants healthy long term, which is why I add organic earthworm castings. I'm still experimenting with substrate rn but thats what is working for me at the moment
 

kadupul

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 26, 2022
Messages
12
I've had great luck with Selaginella, Episcia, and Fittonia. I haven't tried it yet, but i would imagine isopods would also be a nice edition as long as they got some supplemental feeding. There's nothing like a balanced viv. ;)
 

regalpaws

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2022
Messages
137
I've had great luck with Selaginella, Episcia, and Fittonia. I haven't tried it yet, but i would imagine isopods would also be a nice edition as long as they got some supplemental feeding. There's nothing like a balanced viv. ;)
Where did you get your Selaginella? I have heard that isopods can eat at live plants, is that true? I would love to add some to my enclosures!
 

kadupul

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 26, 2022
Messages
12
I got mine from a couple of local greenhouses, but I also see them at Walmart fairly regularly. The kind I mostly see there is S. kraussiana, so if you're looking for something fancier, such as S. uncinata, you may need to look online. Uncinata is also quite cold hardy if gardening is your thing. :p

I've had some Armadillidium nasatum nibble on my Fittonias some, but never anything more than just a little bit on the edges.


20220627_110725.jpg 20220627_111135.jpg
 

regalpaws

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2022
Messages
137
I got mine from a couple of local greenhouses, but I also see them at Walmart fairly regularly. The kind I mostly see there is S. kraussiana, so if you're looking for something fancier, such as S. uncinata, you may need to look online. Uncinata is also quite cold hardy if gardening is your thing. :p

I've had some Armadillidium nasatum nibble on my Fittonias some, but never anything more than just a little bit on the edges.


View attachment 422093 View attachment 422094
Awesome thanks a bunch! Isopods can get pricey, I have a bunch in my garden. Is it ok to quarantine them for awhile and add them?
Love your enclosure btw :D
 

kadupul

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 26, 2022
Messages
12
Quite a few of the isopods on the market are very common in the U.S. and will work just as well for practical purposes. All of mine are wild caught. Different species are better suited to different environments. Armadillium species will thrive in a dryer environment than Trachelipus or Porchellio. If you'd like a more contrasting isopod, peach nasatums are actually a pretty common morph. I get some plastic shoe boxes for just a couple bucks from the dollar store and then punch some holes in it for my colonies. Thank you for the compliment! :happy:

The picture is of just one hunting trip. 20220529_131708_001.jpg
 

regalpaws

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2022
Messages
137
Quite a few of the isopods on the market are very common in the U.S. and will work just as well for practical purposes. All of mine are wild caught. Different species are better suited to different environments. Armadillium species will thrive in a dryer environment than Trachelipus or Porchellio. If you'd like a more contrasting isopod, peach nasatums are actually a pretty common morph. I get some plastic shoe boxes for just a couple bucks from the dollar store and then punch some holes in it for my colonies. Thank you for the compliment! :happy:

The picture is of just one hunting trip. View attachment 422097
Wow thanks a lot!!
 
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