Phidippus Regius help

Socfroggy

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Hello everyone! I recently got my first spider ever and I am in love with the little fella! I got him on Thursday and he arrived alive and well. He ate a cricket that day and then another one the day after. I thought it was curious that he held onto the second cricket longer than the first but what has me concerned is that it has build its hide on the lid. Every time I want to completely remove the lid it will get destroyed. I have a fake bamboo/rock decoration in there that offers plenty of spots to hide as well as an up turned 'log-hut' to hide in. Should I try putting the hut in its correct position? He's also been in the same little corner for the past couple of days. I checked him this morning for movement and he's still alive. Should I be concerned? Is he getting ready to molt? Any and all knowledge is welcome!

I have attached a picture of the set-up I have him in.
 

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chanda

Arachnoking
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That is a HUGE enclosure for a jumping spider! He (or she) is just trying to find a place where he feels secure - and with jumping spiders, that does seem to be in the highest (and least convenient for the keeper!) spot that they can find. Mine almost always web on the underside of the lid. If he persists in webbing on the lid, you may want to consider a different enclosure - perhaps one that opens from the front or something like this: https://jamiestarantulas.com/arboreal-juvenile-enclosure-kit/ where you can remove the lid without damaging any webbing. You could also try offering different accessories in the cage, such as a small cork round or cholla tube that he can web inside or some small natural twigs or branches.

I wouldn't worry about it staying in the same corner for several days. That's perfectly normal. It is not uncommon for them to make little web "cocoons" and stay inside them for extended periods - particularly if it is a female with an egg sac. Even females who have not mated will still lay eggs and will continue to guard their eggs for weeks. Your spider is most likely fine - and not at all hungry. They don't need to eat every day - once every week or so should be sufficient. When the spider gets hungry enough, it will go out prowling around for food.
 

Ratmosphere

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The enclosure looks good, just try to find a smaller place to put the spider in. Amac boxes are perfect for jumpers.
 

Socfroggy

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That is a HUGE enclosure for a jumping spider! He (or she) is just trying to find a place where he feels secure - and with jumping spiders, that does seem to be in the highest (and least convenient for the keeper!) spot that they can find. Mine almost always web on the underside of the lid. If he persists in webbing on the lid, you may want to consider a different enclosure - perhaps one that opens from the front or something like this: https://jamiestarantulas.com/arboreal-juvenile-enclosure-kit/ where you can remove the lid without damaging any webbing. You could also try offering different accessories in the cage, such as a small cork round or cholla tube that he can web inside or some small natural twigs or branches.

I wouldn't worry about it staying in the same corner for several days. That's perfectly normal. It is not uncommon for them to make little web "cocoons" and stay inside them for extended periods - particularly if it is a female with an egg sac. Even females who have not mated will still lay eggs and will continue to guard their eggs for weeks. Your spider is most likely fine - and not at all hungry. They don't need to eat every day - once every week or so should be sufficient. When the spider gets hungry enough, it will go out prowling around for food.

Oh, really?? I was under the impression that they needed room to jump and run. I initially looked at the boxes you posted but deemed them too small. Guess they were the right size. While I have this thread active I might as well get some other questions out of the way.

What should I look for in regards to pre-molt with these guys?

How should I handle a molt? What do I do?

How do I sex my spider?

What is a suitable creature for the enclosure I provided a picture of? Could it house a small tarantula or some sort of scorpion?
 

pannaking22

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Oh, really?? I was under the impression that they needed room to jump and run. I initially looked at the boxes you posted but deemed them too small. Guess they were the right size. While I have this thread active I might as well get some other questions out of the way.

1. What should I look for in regards to pre-molt with these guys?

2. How should I handle a molt? What do I do?

3. How do I sex my spider?

4. What is a suitable creature for the enclosure I provided a picture of? Could it house a small tarantula or some sort of scorpion?
1. Less activity and a lot more web signify either molting or a female laying an egg sac (depends on age of spider)
2. A slight humidity bump and then just leave it alone. Molting is a very stressful time for the spider and the less enclosure bumping the better.
3. It's a bit difficult, but you'll want to keep an eye on the palps. If they swell up as the spider gets older (assuming it isn't an adult), then it'll be male. P. regius is sexually dimorphic, so you'll be able to tell by coloration which gender you have after they reach a certain age.
4. What are the dimensions of the enclosure and what material is the top made of? I think I've seen this type of enclosure before, but I want to make sure before I throw out any ideas.
 

Socfroggy

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1. Less activity and a lot more web signify either molting or a female laying an egg sac (depends on age of spider)
2. A slight humidity bump and then just leave it alone. Molting is a very stressful time for the spider and the less enclosure bumping the better.
3. It's a bit difficult, but you'll want to keep an eye on the palps. If they swell up as the spider gets older (assuming it isn't an adult), then it'll be male. P. regius is sexually dimorphic, so you'll be able to tell by coloration which gender you have after they reach a certain age.
4. What are the dimensions of the enclosure and what material is the top made of? I think I've seen this type of enclosure before, but I want to make sure before I throw out any ideas.

How much of a humidity bump are we talking about? A twice a week type of thing or more?

The enclosure is 8x7.5 inches wide and 10.5 inches high. The top has a plastic frame with metal mesh. I'm assuming steel. I'm hoping to house perhaps a trapdoor, orbweaver or tailless whip scorpion.
 

pannaking22

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How much of a humidity bump are we talking about? A twice a week type of thing or more?

The enclosure is 8x7.5 inches wide and 10.5 inches high. The top has a plastic frame with metal mesh. I'm assuming steel. I'm hoping to house perhaps a trapdoor, orbweaver or tailless whip scorpion.
A little extra mist, but if you still see water on the sides of the enclosure the next day you'll want to be careful the next time you water.

Arboreal scorpions or an amblypygid would probably be your best bet. If you go with an amblypygid, you'll want to cover up some of the screen to maintain humidity and it probably wouldn't be a bad idea with an arboreal scorpion or spider. A trapdoor would just be a lot of wasted space since they're pet holes, though an orbweaver could be an interesting pet to keep in there.
 

Socfroggy

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A little extra mist, but if you still see water on the sides of the enclosure the next day you'll want to be careful the next time you water.

Arboreal scorpions or an amblypygid would probably be your best bet. If you go with an amblypygid, you'll want to cover up some of the screen to maintain humidity and it probably wouldn't be a bad idea with an arboreal scorpion or spider. A trapdoor would just be a lot of wasted space since they're pet holes, though an orbweaver could be an interesting pet to keep in there.
I've received news that tarantulas and scorpions are out of the questions. Maybe
A little extra mist, but if you still see water on the sides of the enclosure the next day you'll want to be careful the next time you water.

Arboreal scorpions or an amblypygid would probably be your best bet. If you go with an amblypygid, you'll want to cover up some of the screen to maintain humidity and it probably wouldn't be a bad idea with an arboreal scorpion or spider. A trapdoor would just be a lot of wasted space since they're pet holes, though an orbweaver could be an interesting pet to keep in there.
I just spoke with my mother ans, unfortunately, tarantulas and scorpions are out of the question :( Would a large nut container be okay for a trapdoor?? And what orb Weaver would you recommend for this enclosure? How about amblypygids?
 

pannaking22

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I just spoke with my mother ans, unfortunately, tarantulas and scorpions are out of the question :( Would a large nut container be okay for a trapdoor?? And what orb Weaver would you recommend for this enclosure? How about amblypygids?
Ah that's too bad since scorps would look good in there, as would assassin bugs now that I think about it. How large is the nut container? It doesn't have to be all that wide, just very deep. I admittedly don't know as much about keeping orb weavers, but you should be fine with pretty much any of the native species, minus Nephila which need ridiculous amounts of space. Pretty much any amblypygid in the US hobby will fit in that enclosure, though if you get something crazy like Heterophrynus batesii it'll need a larger enclosure as it grows. The common ones (Damon diadema and Phrynus marginemaculatus) will both fit in there without a problem and you can actually fit several P. marginemaculatus in there as long as they have plenty of hiding spots. They get along very well communally and are pretty neat little guys. Only one D. diadema though since they get quite a bit larger and aren't communal.
 

basin79

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I keep my little man in a 7x8x8" tub and he's been in that since I got him as a tiny sling. Jumpers are phenomenal. Here's my little fella.

 

Socfroggy

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I keep my little man in a 7x8x8" tub and he's been in that since I got him as a tiny sling. Jumpers are phenomenal. Here's my little fella.

He is adorable! I love the color of the Chella. Mine has more of a chrimson hue.
 

Socfroggy

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Ah that's too bad since scorps would look good in there, as would assassin bugs now that I think about it. How large is the nut container? It doesn't have to be all that wide, just very deep. I admittedly don't know as much about keeping orb weavers, but you should be fine with pretty much any of the native species, minus Nephila which need ridiculous amounts of space. Pretty much any amblypygid in the US hobby will fit in that enclosure, though if you get something crazy like Heterophrynus batesii it'll need a larger enclosure as it grows. The common ones (Damon diadema and Phrynus marginemaculatus) will both fit in there without a problem and you can actually fit several P. marginemaculatus in there as long as they have plenty of hiding spots. They get along very well communally and are pretty neat little guys. Only one D. diadema though since they get quite a bit larger and aren't communal.
I don't have one yet. I'm just planning ahead. Though it will probably be one of the largest and widest Planters but containers. Thanks for the info regarding the tailles whip scorpions. Now my little jumper has decided to stay in her lid cacoon for the week so far. I'm wondering if it is ill-advised to go ahead and lift the lid with her still in the cacoon on it so that I can 1. Put a cork round in there to see if she stops webbing on the lid and 3. So I can get the live and dead cricket out of the enclosure.
 

Spiderbakesale

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I wouldn't disturb her, especially if she's molting. My girls are from the same hatch and so far they've gone into their cocoons once for a complete shed, and they're doing it again now. Both of them are in 14"x8"x6" acrylic boxes full of natural twigs and such.

To discourage webbing to the lid, I put little corner pieces of acrylic into the top, where the lid is. It creates extra stability and a place for them to build into a corner that I can't possibly disturb when opening the top for maintenence.

I've also discovered they're huge fans of small mealworms!
20170124_185846.jpg 20170122_213051.jpg 20170124_184618.jpg
 

Socfroggy

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Do adults still molt?? I've been told she's an adult. I'm waiting to get a good pic of the padipalps too.
 

Ungoliant

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Do adults still molt?? I've been told she's an adult. I'm waiting to get a good pic of the padipalps too.
Like most true spiders (araneomorphs), jumping spiders stop molting once they reach maturity.
 

RTTB

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Jumpers are awesome little beasts that seem to have an intelligence about them.
 

Socfroggy

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Update: I found out that the crickets I fed her are a bit large. I fed her two days in a row and she has spent a week and two days in her cacoon on the top corner of the enclosure. Is she just digesting or should I be concerned?
 

basin79

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Update: I found out that the crickets I fed her are a bit large. I fed her two days in a row and she has spent a week and two days in her cacoon on the top corner of the enclosure. Is she just digesting or should I be concerned?
She'll just be full. If she's full she doesn't need to come out and hunt.
 
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