Phasmids (of some sort...)

Crowbi

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So I study Animal Management and my school has 3 large ExoTerra terrariums FLOODED TO THE BRIM with stick insects. I'm sure they started with a few, but each cage now has 50+ of varying sizes. I'm not sure what species they are and everyone I've asked didn't know either... The smallest babies are bright green whereas the adults are a light brown colour.

I've asked some of the keepers there and was given the go ahead to take some babies or juveniles home. I know the basics of how to keep them, but is there anything specific to keep in mind? I've never hard any before.
 

Andrea82

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For proper care you need to know the species. Some species neef to be kept warmer and more humid than others, and the feeder plants also differs from one species to the next.
It probably is the Indian stick insect, (C.morosus, or Psg 1) given their explosive rate of reproduction, but it is best to be sure.
 

Crowbi

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For proper care you need to know the species. Some species neef to be kept warmer and more humid than others, and the feeder plants also differs from one species to the next.
It probably is the Indian stick insect, (C.morosus, or Psg 1) given their explosive rate of reproduction, but it is best to be sure.
I'll take some pictures next time I'm there. I did ask but since they weren't sure...
What I can tell is that they feed them bramble, so whatever species it is, it does well on it.
 

Andrea82

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I'll takome pictures next time I'm there. I did ask but since they weren't sure...
What I can tell is that they feed them bramble, so whatever species it is, it does well on it.
That doesn't narrow it down...most
phasmids species eat that. ;)
 

Tenodera

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Carausius morosus (Indian Stick Insect) and Medauroidea extradentata (Vietnamese) are the most common twig-like phasmids in US labs and institutions. C. morosus is also established in the wild in areas of California.

I'm shocked that you are allowed to take some home, as exotic phasmids are illegal to keep without permits and regulated containment.
 

pannaking22

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Carausius morosus (Indian Stick Insect) and Medauroidea extradentata (Vietnamese) are the most common twig-like phasmids in US labs and institutions. C. morosus is also established in the wild in areas of California.

I'm shocked that you are allowed to take some home, as exotic phasmids are illegal to keep without permits and regulated containment.
Crowbi is in the UK, otherwise I'd be just as shocked. I don't know what kinds of rules they have over there, but they definitely aren't as strict the US ones.
 

Tenodera

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Oh brilliant, that makes much more sense. And Crowbi, that also means you've got some more species to compare! There's such a variety of phasmids in culture in Europe that it could be a few more things.
 

KevinsWither

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Nothing really specific. Just make sure the population is manageable (the irony with the fact that the class can't control stick insects from overpopulating ). Also feed them brambles and roses from a pesticide free home. Mist everyday and they are one of the easiest things to keep.

And don't release them outside, it's common ethics not to do so. Otherwise your seemingly 4-5 sticks will go to easily 50 unchecked. And potentially 200 or more and that's one reason why stick insects are regulated is due to that reproducibility. Have a plan on identifying the stick insects and sell or give away the extra eggs to the university, local pet stores or to a responsible person.
 

chanda

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One thing to keep in mind if you bring some home is that many phasmids - including the common Indian stick insect - are parthenogenic. Females can reproduce without ever mating, though all of the offspring will also be female if they do so. Even if you don't keep them together, you might still end up with dozens or even hundreds of viable eggs. Because of that, you'll need to be careful about cleaning out their cage, so as not to accidentally discard eggs in a place where they might eventually hatch and crawl off to start families of their own. The eggs are tiny and kind of a pain to pick out of the waste, so it's easier to just bag up the cage cleanings - leaf bits, frass, eggs, and all - and stick the bag in the freezer for a few days to kill any unwanted eggs.
 

Andrea82

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Crowbi is in the UK, otherwise I'd be just as shocked. I don't know what kinds of rules they have over there, but they definitely aren't as strict the US ones.
The UK is much colder than the parts of the US of where you are from. Eggs and sticks will not survive outside, unless it is summer, but even then any offspring will die because of the cold which will inevitably follow.

It only can become a problem when kept inside at roomtemp. But even then, simply thinning out the collection is easy, just sell them or freeze them.
 
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