Personality

KenNet

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Spiders don't know, spiders don't have a clue... Still people are talking about their spider as "highstrung" "calm" or "aggressive". So, how is it? Do they (yes, both 😃) know? Or is it ok to keep them in a box with no other stimulation than food every now and then?
 

DomGom TheFather

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I don't think temperament plays here.
It's impossible to guess what they "know".
What kind of additional stimulation were you thinking?
 

Malum Argenteum

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"highstrung" "calm" or "aggressive".
I think those terms are familiar descriptors used somewhat metaphorically to categorize behavior patterns -- they don't have to entail any mental states whatsoever. (Compare: "my laptop is psychotic today" or "my car is being a jerk".)

The question of environmental enrichment is a different question -- one that keepers with a lot more experience might have some good advice about.
 

Dorifto

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Imho, and I'm not going to expand too much, the more safe feels the T, the less "agressive"/defensive and more laid back it is.

Offer them enough hides, things that make them feel secure and space to run if they "need to", and 99% of the psychotic events will dissapear. Their first instinct and the less energy costly option and the safest one for them, is to run for hide. Remove that hide or the thing that makes them feel safe, and they will defend themselves like no tomorrow.

EG: My pulchra was a complete nightmare when I got her, and I was a bit upset, because they supposedly were one of the calmest T... she wasn't until I rehoused her properly. In a month changed completely from biting the air for "no reason", to be able to gentle touch her to remove things. Since then, any single threat pose, any.
 

Hardus nameous

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Or is it ok to keep them in a box with no other stimulation than food every now and then?
Yup, it is perfectly ok. I have yet to hear my P. muticus beg to go to an art museum.
 

QuinnStarr

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Seconding Malum here.
It’s like when my work laptop acts up and I tell my boss I have to put it in time out because it’s being sassy. It isn’t meant to describe the T’s “personality” but rather to explain it’s behavior in a way that other humans understand.

Hypothetically, if I were to let people handle my tarantulas - I do NOT but IF I did - If I told someone that my Brachy is a little defensive, they know that it’s probably not the one to pick up. But I could tell them that my Avic is chill and they’d know it was one that they could likely handle.

It’s just a way for others to understand the behavior in less words than “Yeah, this one likes to throw a threat pose, which means it puts its four front legs in the air and bares its fangs, and strike any time I open its enclosure”.
 

KenNet

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Yup, it is perfectly ok. I have yet to hear my P. muticus beg to go to an art museum.
Your P. muticus talk to you?

I don't think temperament plays here.

Neither do I.

It's impossible to guess what they "know".

Yes.

What kind of additional stimulation were you thinking?

The kind of stimulation that leads people to uttering the words "highstrung" "calm" or "aggressive" 😃
 

QuinnStarr

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My Brachy gets the zoomies around its enclosure and threat poses when it runs into a leaf every time I open the enclosure to feed it or change its water dish to something not filled with dirt.
That’s all the stimulation they need, as far as I’m concerned. Food, the occasional “hey you! you better not touch me again, see?” threat to a plastic leaf, and the any necessary size appropriate rehousing.
 

viper69

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Spiders don't know, spiders don't have a clue... Still people are talking about their spider as "highstrung" "calm" or "aggressive". So, how is it? Do they (yes, both 😃) know? Or is it ok to keep them in a box with no other stimulation than food every now and then?
Are you suggesting they need stimulation in captivity? If so, what stimulation from the wild do they need or should have in captivity?
 

AphonopelmaTX

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Spiders don't know, spiders don't have a clue... Still people are talking about their spider as "highstrung" "calm" or "aggressive". So, how is it? Do they (yes, both 😃) know? Or is it ok to keep them in a box with no other stimulation than food every now and then?
Terms like high strung, calm, and aggressive are used to describe a tarantula's threshold for unfavorable stimulus before their fight or flight instinct kicks in and not to describe any kind of personality. As far as I can tell, a flight or fight reaction is more of a reflex than an action in which they choose to make. With enough time and experience physically interacting with tarantulas, one can even come to see patterns which can be used to manipulate them. For example, a tarantula will be more likely to fight when inside of its enclosure, or within a hide-a-way within the enclosure, but outside it will run. Therefore, housing in larger than necessary enclosures to provide more space for running about will make rehousing easier. Or if housing in a small enclosure, transfers will go smoother if you let the tarantula run out into a larger container for recapture.

The terms also seem to be applied to the disposition of a tarantula depending on a person's own reaction or perception to a defensive behavior. For example, a tarantula that is quick to rear back and bite might be considered more defensive, or aggressive, than a tarantula that is quick to run and/ or kick hairs. Most likely because we people interpret biting a more aggressive action than kicking hairs or running. It would be more accurate to call any tarantula that is quick to run, kick hairs, or bite high strung since they are all quick to defend themselves. By contrast any tarantula that is slow, or not so quick to defend themselves, can be considered calm or docile. The Avicularia species can be confusing in this regard since their primary mode of active defense is to rub their abdomen on a would-be attacker to transfer the heavy type 2 urticating bristles. To us people, it might look cute and unthreatening having a tarantula try to rub its butt on your hand, but it too can be considered high strung or aggressive if it is quick to do so.

Being high strung, calm, or aggressive has no connection with the requirement for any kind of stimulation whether mental or physical in nature. All tarantulas just want to stay out of sight and be left alone. Keeping them in a box of dirt, with accommodations for their health and lifestyle is all that is needed.
 
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Hardus nameous

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Your P. muticus talk to you?
Of course it does, just in its own way.
Mostly it tells me to go away and it's too bright in here. On occasion it reminds me how humans tend to be anthropomorphic due to our inefficient energy wasting brains; for should we have evolved sleek efficient ganglia we would understand other creatures' perceptions. Also it says I'm ugly and it doesn't want to look at me.
 

greeneyedelle

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Spiders don't know, spiders don't have a clue... Still people are talking about their spider as "highstrung" "calm" or "aggressive". So, how is it? Do they (yes, both 😃) know? Or is it ok to keep them in a box with no other stimulation than food every now and then?
Spiders are living creatures that lack sentience. Personally, I find that anthromorphism is satisfying and a welcome feature of the human condition. It's fun to give human characteristics to my t's for no other reason than I enjoy it. But in reality, my actions and interactions with it will never be perceived with anything more than instinct, and most often that instinct is that my presence is a threat or at the very least, disconcerting. So, yes, being kept in a box with food and water is probably exactly what spiders want haha

My g. pulchra is currently telling me to "f*** off" with a substrate barrier over the opening of her hide. Translated to a more logical explanation: My g. pulchra has likely been overfed, and no longer wants to encounter food until her next molt. "This particular g. pulchra was "moody as sh**" until I treated her like the queen she is and upgraded her castle": This g. pulchra was housed in an enclosure that didn't have enough space or substrate to dig in, and that resulted in an agitated t. Since rehousing into a larger enclosure, her stances have shown significant improvement in her stress levels.

The fun in owning t's as display animals, for me, is learning the nuances in each species as I interact with them as simply as I'm able to. Giving food, giving water, rehousing, and noting with interest how each t responds to such things. But does the t know? No. I'm a prison warden playing house with the inmates as Viper once analogized, and they can't comprehend that at all.
 

KenNet

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Are you suggesting they need stimulation in captivity?

Yes.

If so, what stimulation from the wild do they need or should have in captivity?

I don't know. That's kinda the core of my question 😃
 

Neonblizzard

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Well they aren't social creatures, they live in a hole in the ground their entire life while dodging predators, harsh weather and jumping on passing prey.

I think giving them stuff to play with is more for the owner to feel better than anything else
 

KenNet

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Spiders are living creatures that lack sentience.

How do you know to make that, quite dramatic, destiction? Is the mosquito you killed last night sentient?

Personally, I find that anthromorphism is satisfying and a welcome feature of the human condition. It's fun to give human characteristics to my t's for no other reason than I enjoy it.

It is. I totally agree with you! My spiders agree to and give you a high 8.


But in reality, my actions and interactions with it will never be perceived with anything more than instinct,

How do you know this? You've been a spider in your past life? Or you just assuming?

and most often that instinct is that my presence is a threat or at the very least, disconcerting. So, yes, being kept in a box with food and water is probably exactly what spiders want haha

So, that's their "personality" 😃


My g. pulchra is currently telling me to "f*** off" with a substrate barrier over the opening of her hide. Translated to a more logical explanation: My g. pulchra has likely been overfed, and no longer wants to encounter food until her next molt. "This particular g. pulchra was "moody as sh**" until I treated her like the queen she is and upgraded her castle": This g. pulchra was housed in an enclosure that didn't have enough space or substrate to dig in, and that resulted in an agitated t. Since rehousing into a larger enclosure, her stances have shown significant improvement in her stress levels.

The fun in owning t's as display animals, for me, is learning the nuances in each species as I interact with them as simply as I'm able to. Giving food, giving water, rehousing, and noting with interest how each t responds to such things. But does the t know? No. I'm a prison warden playing house with the inmates as Viper once analogized, and they can't comprehend that at all.
 
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