Paruroctonus boreus

What o you think about Paruroctonus boreus?


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Travis K

TravIsGinger
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I went Scorping alst night at Hawk Creek, Washington, on the south sie of the Columbia River and caught lots of Paruroctonus boreus. I am still very tired and need to post pics and stuff, but I was wondering if any on would be interested in getting som of these scorpions for them selves and what would be a good price?
 

Travis K

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Thinking about...

I am thinking about starting a communal setup with the adults and subadults. I haven't noticed any aggresiveness between any that were put together and besides the 11 2nd or 3rd Instars some of the adults were found less than a foot apart.

Does any one know if this species is truely communal?
 

Warren Bautista

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I think the word "tolerant" would suit them the best. They don't mind each other, but if you forget to feed them, it might result in cannibalism.
 

Travis K

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I think the word "tolerant" would suit them the best. They don't mind each other, but if you forget to feed them, it might result in cannibalism.
I have two juvies in a jar together and they have been great "thus" far. Besides the 2 or 3 instars I am going to put them all together. I brought a larger one to work and will try to get some good/decent pics uploaded today.
 

Travis K

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Habitat pics

Here are some pics of the area. While I did not manage to get pics of the specific location where the scorps were collected I can tell you that they were collected on 45 degree angled slopes or greater. The slopes were south facing "sandy" to "sandy loam" with spars grasses of varying species. Believe it or not, the only places where we found any P. boreus were the banks along side the dirt road leading into the area. After about an hour of searching the more remote "natural" areas Jasen and I decided to look along the roadside with an 18" florescent UV light and bingo.









 

Warren Bautista

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Those are pretty cool scorps. lol

If you have a few extra and are looking for Ts, let me know. :)
 

Minuteman1776

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I don't know about the scorps... but I'll take some of that scenery any day.
Very beautiful up there....

Texas...pfff, RALF !
 

pandinus

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it would probably be best just to only take a few and leave the rest as i've heard that the local populations of these guys in northern areas tend to deplete rapidly if very many individuals are removed, although i have no personal experience.





John
 

Travis K

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it would probably be best just to only take a few and leave the rest as i've heard that the local populations of these guys in northern areas tend to deplete rapidly if very many individuals are removed, although i have no personal experience.





John
From what I could tell the population is VERY Healthy. There are literally thousands of square miles of prime P. boreus habitat on and around the Culumbia River alone. But most people don't walk around outside with black lights and don't even know what comes out at night. There are a lot of places I want to start looking to see far far out from the river areas these guys can be found, now that I know what types of habitat they prefer. For a little species of scorpion they are rather fascinating.
 

Travis K

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Communal update

Well I got them all in their "communal" enclosure and they seem to be interacting nicely, no deaths or even aggressive behavior toward each other. I'll get some pics up of the communal observations in a new thread in the next few weeks. I am very surprised at how active this species is. I have 5 scorps together and at least one of them is moving around at all times. This is not a boring species that is for sure.

Regards,
 

BrettG

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I would have said heck with the scorps and done sone Trout fishing!!!!!!!!!!! but nice finds nonetheless.............
 

DireWolf0384

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I'm actually disabled but do some janitorial work on the side and thats not much. I put down $5 cause that's all I can afford right now. :8o
 

Travis K

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I think I have a Paruroctonus that is something other than boreus? I would have got pics last night but I was super tired and the camera was dead, will try to get some up on Monday. If this is a P. sp. "whatever" it is about half the size of boreus the body ratios are wrong as well, but I don't want to jump to conclusions so I will get as good of macro shots as I can and get advice.
 

Travis K

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OK, It's official...

P. boreus is not exactly communal. I had one death so now I am down to four adults and 11 itty bitty scorplings. What, you were right.
 

AzJohn

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OK, It's official...

P. boreus is not exactly communal. I had one death so now I am down to four adults and 11 itty bitty scorplings. What, you were right.
Do you know the sex of the dead one. A lot of times males will kill each other. Females tend to be more forgiving.


John
 
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