Parabuthus schlechteri (Namibia)

Ice Cold Milk

Arachnobaron
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Jul 21, 2004
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Hey all, just picked up a couple different species from a friend who came back from Namibia.
The first pics are of P. schlechteri, i'd assume that they've been positively identified (The guy really knows his stuff), but he did have a hard time ID'ing the 2nd species. One specimen is currently being sent off to our local expert for ID, but in the meantime, any guesses?
Both are Namibian.
The unidentified species is smaller than the schlechteri, and we had 2 other specimens of it, both the same size.

As you'll notice, they are not in an optimal environment for keeping...I took pics before I rehoused them. So no need to tell me that I can't keep them like they are being kept! However, I would welcome any suggestions as to how I should keep them.
I plan on using a sand-velt (sandy topsoil, we get it here locally) type setup with dried wood and a few rocks.
oh and I'm using a $1 just for you guys!
-=ICM=-



other species:

 

Bigboy

Arachnoprince
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Whatever the second species is I really like it, is it an immature Androctonus sp??. How did your friend come to aquire a collectors permit in Namibia?
 
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Arachnophilist

Arachnoprince
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yeah the second one definately looks lika an Andro to me.. no hairs on its tail like a Parabuthus.
 

Bigboy

Arachnoprince
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A.sergenti? Sigh, after doing some more searching I'm thoroughly stumped. My next guess would be a hogg, but neither match up completely with the picture.
 
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Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
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Strange that they might be worried about permits for scorps when, from what I here in the news, they need to spend more time and money on resolving some poverty and civil war type issues in Africa. There is a good reason for permits though, usually. Awesome scorps and thanks for the $1. That really helps with estimating the size. Yea, the contrast on that scorp is cool! I've often thought about moving to S. Africa, and allot of other places... Australia, New Zealand... Allot of interesting stuff in Australia and pretty isolated from all the political junk.
 

fusion121

Arachnoking
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The second one is probably not a Parabuthus sp. due to the lack of general granulation/hairs and the stridulatory region. It does look like an Androctonus sp. (though whether it is one is another question), however there are no Androctonus reported from Namibia. It could possibly be from one of the more obscure Buthidae families.
 

ParabuthusKing

Arachnoknight
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Awesome scorpions:).. I think I started drooling looking at the P. schlechteri .... I am very into the Parabuthus genus and would love to see all species bred in captivity ..best of luck with them, they are beautiful :)
 

Bigboy

Arachnoprince
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The second one is probably not a Parabuthus sp. due to the lack of general granulation/hairs and the stridulatory region. It does look like an Androctonus sp. (though whether it is one is another question), however there are no Androctonus reported from Namibia. It could possibly be from one of the more obscure Buthidae families.
Yea, I tried to find references of Androctonus in Namibia but couldn't find any. I'm not too sure though how well studied and catalogued scorpions and other such obscure fauna are documented in that particular country. What genus do you think it might be? Definitly buthidae, I love mystery bugs!
 

quiz

Arachnoprince
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Mr. Ice,
that is one beautiful Parabuthus :worship: .
 

Bigboy

Arachnoprince
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Hmm, you know the more I look the more I think parabuthus might just be a possibility.
 

JSN

Arachnodemon
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sweet specimens and pics...your a lucky guy...
 

tarsier

Arachnodemon
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beautiful scorpions.

i really like the P. schlechteri.
 

Hannes

Arachnopeon
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Oct 23, 2006
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Cool scorps. my favorite species...! My guess on the second one is P.granulatus. The most venomous in South Africa.
 

Hannes

Arachnopeon
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Oct 23, 2006
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The 1st one is definitely P.villosus, the biggest Buthidae in the world, grows up to 180mm and are found in three colour forms.
 

Ice Cold Milk

Arachnobaron
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P. villosus for the first pics? *shrug*...
These specimens are quite huge. so perhaps they are villosus.

As for how they were collected, I'm under the impression that collector's permits are not needed, but as for how they ended up here in South Africa...I don't ask, they don't tell.



The larger specimens were sexed for me as male and female...the females don't look gravid but could indeed be. It's a bit late in the season though for them to be giving birth...maybe next year.
 

Hannes

Arachnopeon
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I don't think its to late, i've got a gravid P.transvaalicus and to gravid H.trilineatus scorps that are due in the next 2 weeks.
 

Alakdan

Arachnoangel
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Whoa! I want one.:drool: That's a very good looking scorp. You're lucky to have one in your collection.
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
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there are indeed no Androctonus species in SA, but these are two Parabuthus sp and not all parabuthus have hirsute metasoma's.....
There are around 30 Parabuthus sp....it is probably a less well known Parabuthus.
Please be carefull with these species guys, they are very venomous.
 
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