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Pandinus cavimanus (Red Claw Scorpion)

DavidE721

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 13, 2007
Messages
62
Approximately three hours ago, I was stung by a 3.5-inch Pandinus cavimanus on the left side of my right index finger. A small spot of blood appeared where the aculeus (stinger) penetrated. The initial envenomation was noticeable in that the area of the sting suddenly felt mildly warm.

On a scale of 1 to 10 (10 being the most severe), the pain was about a 3. No swelling occurred. However, there was a very mild sensitivity at the site of the sting with some mild tingling. These sensations are now beginning to disappear all together. The most notable thing about this experience is that it lasted for, again, about three hours given that the 'pain' (sensitive/tingling sensation, that is) was very subtle right from the beginning.

Naturally, a larger individual P. cavimanus would produce more noticeable effects. :)

UPDATE (3/15/09): Although it appeared as though the effects of the sting were going to disappear at the time of the initial post above, a slight tingling sensation and soreness was experienced until a short while ago on the following day. The symptoms have entirely disappeared by the time of this update.
 
Last edited:

DavidE721

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 13, 2007
Messages
62
Pandinus cavimanus

Hello,

The circumstances were such that, to my recollection, I was simply picking him/her up (it's a juvenile). Most of my arachnids calm down immediately when I handle them. However, these guys have quite an 'attitude' when compared to, say, P. imperator. Although he did calm down after I placed him on the palm of my hand, he made his 'point' quite clear beforehand (yes, a pun is intended).

Also, I must admit, I'm of the old school such as Dr. Baerg belonged to (i.e., the same Dr. Baerg who wrote the classic "The Tarantula"). Out of scientific curiousity and for the record, I was indeed curious to see for myself how I would react to the P. cavimanus's venom. Of course, I would not advise that anyone should follow Dr. Baerg's (or my) approach to 'testing' venom.

Thanks,

Dave :)
 
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