Palming the Tarantula...

Iktomi

Arachnoservant
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 16, 2002
Messages
539
Hey all. After spending some time here, I finally bought a copy of the The Tarantula Keeper's Guide. Previously I only owned Tarantulas and other Arachnids.
Anyway, on page 141 of the TKG they talk about "Getting Palmed." My question is whether or not this is a widely used method and whether or not it works. For the limited time I've been in the hobby, all anyone talks about is the carapace grip. I hadn't heard of this method until reading this book.
Do you use it? Does it work? Common mistakes?
Thanks in advance.
 

toan

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 27, 2002
Messages
83
depending on specie, you should wear gloves when "palming." I've done it with some specie and they really make your palm itch. Personally, I respect the Schlutzes but have never heard of any cases where gripping it across the carapace to have caused problems (assuming you're gentle). I don't have time to get gloves every time so until emperical evidence shows otherwise, I'll practice the the thumb-finger tip hold.

toan
 

Jobe

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 9, 2002
Messages
187
Palming the tarantula? They come out with new things to call it everyday, dont they?...sure, i guess its a good method with the carapace-grip and all...and a bottle of moisturiser, some hot towels and a really good mag might add to the experience too. =D=D=D

-e-
 

MrT

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 13, 2002
Messages
2,174
I've tryed it, and its not as easy as it looks. Not easy at all.
If the T would just sit there and not move, it might be ok.
Every time I've tryed it , the T's try to get away. And that blows the whole deal. IMO

Ernie
 

Wade

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
2,933
I think alot of it is how big the T is relative to your hand. I have fairly big hands and the palming method doesn't work for me except for very large T's.

The carapice-grip method works resonably well for calm new worlders, but it's alot tricker in fiester t's! I was tying to examine an Asian of indetremante species (the psuedo H. costale). At first, all was well, but suddenly the t starts struggling and I realized that I was either going to get bit or drop the T! Fortunately, I was able to get it back into it's container without injury to either one of us. Lesson learned!

Wade
 
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