Opinions on the L. parahybana?

Flutterbat

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
23
I recently have gotten into this hobby, and I am looking for a second T. One that I have been heavily been considering is the L. parahybana. From my little experiences and from what I've read about them, these seem too be fairly good for those new to the hobby. Opinions?
 

Phaedrus

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 18, 2016
Messages
19
I recently have gotten into this hobby, and I am looking for a second T. One that I have been heavily been considering is the L. parahybana. From my little experiences and from what I've read about them, these seem too be fairly good for those new to the hobby. Opinions?
An LP is a very wise choice, they're inexpensive and easy to raise.
 

tarantulashack

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 20, 2015
Messages
17
I would highly consider this species. I've never received a threat pose there always out and about not to skittish and get very large. My personal favorite to deal with and extremely easy to keep I've owned 12 all together and all have been awsome
 

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 16, 2014
Messages
195
buy some gloves when working with this spider. You may be one of the lucky few who are not affected by the hair but...better safe than sorry.

These T's are pretty cool and easy to care for. Can be intimidating though. They "hiss" even when walking.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,301
I'm a huge fan of them, just be aware that they have some pretty nasty urticating setae ("itchy hairs").

If you want more options on beginner T's to get, take a look and see if one catches your eye:
 

Coconana

Arachnosquire
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
105
Parahybana's are my man's absolute favorite! Our big girl's about 8" DLS, but I've raised slings before, and as mentioned above --they're incredibly easy, and they grow like weeds thanks to their voracious appetite. In my experience, they're also quite durable; you'd be hard pressed to find a more forgiving species in terms of keeper experience. I think they're a wonderful choice!

That being said, their urticating hairs are brutal. I do tank maintenance with swimming goggles and a mask on... though, truth be told, my big girl flicks like it's nobody's business, so be prepared with duct tape. I've found that helps with the itching.

Good luck, and if you decide to get one, post some photos so we can see your new addition! :)
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,373
They're eating machines, but don't think that quality is unique in any way to them, there are dozens of better looking choices with the same type of ridiculous feeding response....they are dirt cheap, as the market is constantly flooded with them....my advice is to ignore this species and get something that looks better...I guarantee if you stay in the hobby for any length of time, you will get LP's as freebies...people actually have trouble even giving them away. I have avoided Lasiodora like the plague...yet I have 3 different species of them anyway...they're virtually unavoidable, so why target them?

G. pulchripes gets nearly as large, and has a similar feeding response and a much gentler temperament....they just don't grow quite as fast (although faster than most beginner types).

Others like N. chromatus, A. geniculata, or even GBB would be similar in temperament to an LP, and they all look so much nicer its not even a fair comparison. Growth rates are also similar (GBB is a tad slower). The few desirables that the LP has, exist in many cooler species...JMO.

The red legged Brachypelmas are all gorgeous, and have more desirable temperaments for a beginner, and as adults, they generally have a great feeding response as well.

I'll also add that most places greatly exaggerate the size of Lp's, often claiming 8-10+" spiders....in reality, they are a 7 to 8 inch (tops) spider....just like so many of the large south American terrestrials.

They're easily my least favorite of all large terrestrials....I don't get all the love they receive.
 

Andy00

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 4, 2016
Messages
154
I got an LP as my second T, but I wish I got an A. Geniculata instead. Genics have such awesome colors, they grow at the same speed if not faster, they get pretty much the same size, and they have a crazy appetite. They cost a bit more though. Still, I love LP but there's some more T's out there that fit your experience and imo look better than the LP. Keep looking! Some others that would fit your experience and look amazing are the gbb(more expensive) and the b vagans(very cheap)
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,301
I'm tossing in another vote for an A. geniculata. They readily bite anything that moves, so be aware of that. It's not that they're aggressive, they're just always hungry! I've never gotten a threat posture from mine, but she does kick quite a bit of setae. Their setae is particularly painful, it's just itchy. For a spider its size, it is also pretty fast. If you don't mind the speed and bitey nature of this species, then I say for go it. This is one of my favorite species, period.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,826
Lasiodora parahybana are excellent Theraphosidae, perfect for everyone. Easy to care, hardy T's, in general with a benign temperament, a nice size, cheap as hell. They are viewed often like "local bikes" T's and this IMO hurts :-/

Only those few arachnid disciples that went really trough a total arachnid ban are able to understand me. I know people that had killed for own one of those, here in Italy, after the ban occured in 2003, for own a chubby "LP" after their "choosy to LP" OW years.

Buy one if you can I say.
 

Haemus

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
128
My sister got a L. Parahybana sling as her first T for very cheap at an expo. As a sling it spent a lot of time hiding, but after a considerable increase in size we're starting to see it out and about more.

I agree with @cold blood in regards to the G. Pulchripes. I've had little issues caring for my two. So little in fact that I'm starting to wonder how challenging it is caring for a more defensive and faster species...But I'm avoiding that rabbit hole for now lol.
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,675
My L.parahybana male is the grumpiest T i own. He threatposes to anything invading his space, food, water, me. He doesn't flick though, which is a good thing since i am becoming More sensitieve to the urticating hairs. I think there are beter options out there, G.pulchripes, G.pulchra, A.geniculata being some of them. C.cyaneopubescens or GBB is also a nice choice, but they can be skittish and fast.
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,437
@cold blood is spot on - the hobby is absolutely saturated with LP's and you're bound to get one as a freebie at one point. If a breeder/seller is nudging you in that direction - it is probably because they are sitting on hundreds of them and can't even give them away fast enough. They're thinking of their best interests and not yours.
The Lasiodora genus was never on my radar either, but I have an L. difficilis spiderling. You guessed it... they were a freebie.
 

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
404
I had been tempted to get one, but the super common nature and (from what I've heard) really bad ulticating hair turned me off to searching one out to purchase. Like @cold blood and @VanessaS said if someone sends me a freebie I won't complain, but I'm not going to go out of the way to order one.
 

BobBarley

Arachnoprince
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
1,487
LP's are great go for it! I barely react to any urticating hairs and I usually don't notice it. It's great, lol.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,026
L. parahybana is generally a great beginner species. Though, even if a T is a species recommended to beginners it could still have defensive qualities. I have 2 female parahybana. They can throw a tantrum quite often and the hairs can be a bit extreme for some if it is a heavy flicker. Each T is an individual and may act different from the norm. Take G. rosea/porteri for example. They are sold to beginners but are prone to mood swings.

I have 2 female LP one is usually calm and docile, the other hates my guts..

.. Here she is-
View media item 34787
For the most part, this species is good for beginners and is a good gateway to other larger, more defensive Ts. It is a great species.

Usually found for sale dirt cheap, it makes for a great addition to anyones collection.
 

bryverine

Arachnoangel
Joined
Apr 18, 2012
Messages
894
My L.parahybana male is the grumpiest T i own. He threatposes to anything invading his space, food, water, me. ...I think there are beter options out there, G.pulchripes, G.pulchra, A.geniculata being some of them. C.cyaneopubescens or GBB is also a nice choice, but they can be skittish and fast.
@Jamie Moore
I agree with above. I like my girl, but she is a bit grumpy. Very hardy appetite and grow at a decent pace though.

I personally would recommend you go with a 'GBB'. They're simply beautiful and they are happy with (require) low humidity so their care is super easy. My girl is an eating machine comparable to both my LP and regalis.

Here's a picture of my girl after getting her blue legs.
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,437
Jamie has had her very first tarantula for less than two weeks. Personally, I would hold off buying any, regardless of species, until you have had time to observe your current tarantula and deal with some of the more common challenges with them.
Asking for everyone's opinion on the next one is awesome, and helps you to prepare, but I would give yourself a bit of time with your current tarantula.
 

Tim Benzedrine

Prankster Possum
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 4, 2004
Messages
1,471
I like mine. It has flicked hairs at me a few times, but I haven't got any on me. Maybe because they have only been half-hearted flicks so far. I may find out differently when the next rehouse comes around, but that may be as long as a year from now. If I were inclined to be a handler, which I am not, she is not one I would do so with, because of the hairs and the fact that she is pretty skitttish.

I tend to disagree with the opinion that they are not attractive tarantulas. They are not flashy, but I think they are pretty good-looking just the same. As has been said, care is easy, they eat well and grow fast. I won't go as far to say that I'd choose one over an A. geniculata if I could only have one or the other, but I like having both.
 

Bread

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 11, 2016
Messages
26
Mine digs like a monster, I'm surprised the roof doesn't collapse as she's excavated most of the soil underneath.
She dpesn't like being watched when shes digging though, expect balls of substrate to head in your direction, multiple times.
 
Top