Opinions on beginner obligate burrower species

EulersK

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I did not know this is an obligate burrowing species I always pictured these being housed terrestrial
Many people do, but when given the option, they burrow. These are much less of a "pet hole" than the rest I'm about to bring up, and also one of only two NW on the list. A. seemanni are fairly docile relatively speaking, but quite a bit more skittish than their cousin A. chalcodes. As always with these Aphonopelma, though, they're slow growing. Be prepared for that. But this is the only beginner tarantula on the list, and frankly one of my favorite. It also likes it a bit more humid, so you could even set up a vivarium if you're up for that nightmare fun task.
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The only other NW would be M. robustum, and again, they like it humid as well. They burrow deep, but are on the surface at all hours... until they get startled. They are probably the most skittish spider I've ever owned, and they're fast. But they always make a B-line to their hole. Gorgeous spider and out constantly. Couldn't ask for much more.
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P. muticus was already brought up, but this is certainly a pet hole. Unless you're lucky enough to have it make the burrow right up against the glass/plastic, you'll never see this one unless you're fond of midnight viewings. This is an advanced species, and quite defensive.
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M. balfouri don't burrow very deep, but they are considered burrowers. They also incorporate heavy webbing into their homes. They're fairly passive as far as OW's go, but remember that they're still a baboon. When it comes to fight or flight, they'll usually choose flight.
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C. darlingi is a great beginner OW species if that's what you're looking for. They will absolutely bite if antagonized, but hopefully you're not going to antagonize it. They're easy to keep because they take it absolutely bone dry in specimens larger than 2", and they're a bit passive in terms of defensiveness. They won't run for the hills at every disturbance, but they will make their way into their hole when disturbed. Also, it's got a horn. So there's that.
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Finally, you can choose anything from the Chilobrachys genus, but C. fimbriatus is my favorite. You can actually choose to have either a heavy webber or an obligate burrower - they're perfectly happy to do either. If you want a burrower, then provide a starter burrow with no webbing anchor points. You'll have a pet hole in no time. If you want a webber, provide plenty of webbing anchor points. The latter will turn it into a display spider. Heads up on this species: if a spider can be called aggressive, this is it. They won't stand their ground when threatened, they will actually chase down intruders within the confines of their enclosure. They seem very reluctant to leave the enclosure, however. Note that they are always willing to bite. Nasty venom and a nasty attitude, but one of my favorite species out there.
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user 666

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At what time of day are M robustums active?

I have two for about a month now, and I have never seen them.
 

EulersK

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At what time of day are M robustums active?

I have two for about a month now, and I have never seen them.
What size are yours? Mine are out at all hours. I've got one juvie male and one juvie female. They scurry away at a heavy footstep, I kid you not, so you might just be scaring them away. They're also a bit photosensitive, so perhaps it's just too bright where you keep them. My are both on a shelf that gets very little light, but it's not pitch black by any means.
 

Bugmom

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A. seemanni is definitely a good choice. Mine has made an impressive burrow for himself.

A. ezendami, as mentioned also, is a good choice. I find they are one of the best beginner old world species.

Ephobopus are great too, but they are faster than seemanni and ezendami, in my experience.

I. mira is another option. They make cool trapdoors.
 

user 666

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What size are yours? Mine are out at all hours. I've got one juvie male and one juvie female. They scurry away at a heavy footstep, I kid you not, so you might just be scaring them away. They're also a bit photosensitive, so perhaps it's just too bright where you keep them. My are both on a shelf that gets very little light, but it's not pitch black by any means.
Mine are around 3".

And i do have a heavy tread, so that could be it.
 

johnny quango

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M robustum you've just got to have at least 1 in your collection. I acquired a juvenile female last year after a conversation with @Chris LXXIX.

I see mine fairly often but only for a split second then she's gone. On the plus side though I now have a scale model of an house from the shire in her enclosure I think it's a replica of bilbo baggins house
 

DrowsyLids

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I set up my 1.5" LP in a 32 oz deli filled with substrate and now it made a pretty decent burrow. This should curb my cravings until I pick up a true fossorial species
 

YagerManJennsen

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@DrowsyLids If you're still searching, I'm an advocate of Ephebopus murinus. They will burrow but aren't much of a pet hole. I see mine everyday. Plus they are beauties to look at.
 

Jeff23

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I don't see Neoholothele incei or Bumba cabocla which are both good NW choices. I see my female 3" B. cabocla more often than many of my terrestrials of the same size.
 

cold blood

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I don't see Neoholothele incei or Bumba cabocla which are both good NW choices. I see my female 3" B. cabocla more often than many of my terrestrials of the same size.
Is cabocla an obligate?

Mine...granted theyre like 1"...havent made an effort to burrow or hide in the 3.5 months ive had them....great eaters, though.
 

user 666

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Is cabocla an obligate?

Mine...granted theyre like 1"...havent made an effort to burrow or hide in the 3.5 months ive had them....great eaters, though.
I have a 1" B cabocla in Hobby Lobby display case (hot wheel car). It has thoroughly redecorated its enclosure to such a degree that the surface of the substrate is now actually a tunnel with a plastic lid.

Yes, it digs that much, which is why I would call it an obligate.

It's one of my favorite slings right now.
 

Jeff23

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Is cabocla an obligate?

Mine...granted theyre like 1"...havent made an effort to burrow or hide in the 3.5 months ive had them....great eaters, though.
I just did a little searching after your post and it looks like people are getting mixed results with them.

When I bought my female, I didn't know if she was WC or LB. But I couldn't find much on them. What I did find said burrowing at that time.

I gave her slightly over 6" deep moist substrate and a half cylinder of cork bark. She covered up the entrance of the cork bark with substrate and made her own entrance on the opposite side between cork bark and glass. I use a flap to block light on that side. I can lift the flap and can see inside there with a red light that she has a hole going straight down but I can't tell much since it isn't near the glass. I believe it connects to a another burrow entrance she created right next to the water dish. She doesn't create any thick webs but I can barely see some small threads stretching across between objects on top of the substrate. Mine normally stays down in the burrow but will come up for periods of time especially if she is hungry before my timed feeding.

http://zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=4166

http://tarantulas.su/en/evolution/Theraphosinae/Bumba (former Maraca)
 
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Icculus

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I don't see Neoholothele incei or Bumba cabocla which are both good NW choices. I see my female 3" B. cabocla more often than many of my terrestrials of the same size.
Now that my n incei is settled it's always at the entrance of its burrow or just outside of it. Awesome little t
 

DrowsyLids

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Hey all. I appreciate your input, everybody.! So far I've been weighing my options locally and I've found these species available at good prices.
-0.1 4" E. murinus
-0.0.1 1.5" I. mira
-0.0.1 1-2" M. balfouri

I will most likely choose one of these three, leaning towards the I. mira.
 

EulersK

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Hey all. I appreciate your input, everybody.! So far I've been weighing my options locally and I've found these species available at good prices.
-0.1 4" E. murinus
-0.0.1 1.5" I. mira
-0.0.1 1-2" M. balfouri

I will most likely choose one of these three, leaning towards the I. mira.
I've wanted an I. mira for quite some time, never had one before. By all accounts though, they're the definition of a pet hole. I know that @viper69 only sees his because it was kind enough to set up the burrow up against the wall of the enclosure.

If I were you, I'd choose the E. murinus mainly because of the confirmed sex and size.
 
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