Opinions on beginner obligate burrower species

DrowsyLids

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I have never owned a true burrowing species and I might pick one or more in the future to broaden my collection. Let's see some opinions?
 

cold blood

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About 2 years...males mature in about 2 years as well IME.

The rough part is 2i to almost 1". By 1" their feeding response picks up (as do growth rates) and by 2" theyre great eaters...adults are fantastic eaters.

Now, at least for me, its not that the slings don't eat, they do, some are just shy about it...the thing is that they don't want to eat that often. When I tried feeding them like oher slings, once or twice a week, I got a regular refusals....like half might eat and half might not (I have raised over 100 of these). Now I feed them every 10-20 days, and generally I get few refusals. I'd suggest getting them at 1" and not 2i (but nothing wrong with it) or even getting a juvie.
 

Andrea82

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A.ezendami and -junodi are next on my to-get-list, they are gorgeous :)

Another OB genus is Ephebopus. Practicly the whole genus looks beautiful :) and they flick hairs from their pedipalps.
They can be quite defensive and fast though, and their venom is relatively strong for a NW.
 

Chris LXXIX

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I have never owned a true burrowing species and I might pick one or more in the future to broaden my collection. Let's see some opinions?
NW?

On my book everyone should keep a Megaphobema robustum, man. It's a shame such Theraphosidae isn't considered too much. Genus Ephebopus are also hardcore burrowers :-s

OW?

Genus Ceratogyrus with Ceratogyrus marshalli at the top, that horn is something incredible.
 

Paiige

Arachnobaron
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Oct 2, 2016
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My first (and only) is E. cyanognathus. I'm pretty sure I love it, don't see it much but when I do it's a treat! I haven't had it for too long but it's a beautiful little thing and is very quick and eats like a little monster. 10/10 would buy again.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Or they could save some money and just fill an unoccupied enclosure with dirt.

It's basically the same thing.
Well, at least that would be of help in the case of those concerned about their landlords (muahahah, that term cracks me up) that don't want T's around their $ precious property.

"See my dirt, for my DIY eco-friendly projects, like Al Gore teached me u_u"

"Bravo, bravo!"
 

user 666

Arachnobaron
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Jan 27, 2017
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351
Try Aphonopelma seemanni. :)
I did not know this is an obligate burrowing species I always pictured these being housed terrestrial
I have found that the Aphonopelma are enthusiastic burrowers - almost obligate. I have 4 in the 2" to 3" range, and they have all dug elaborate tunnels.

But they also spend a lot of time on the surface, so much so that you could label them terrestrial. (I honestly see the Aphonopelma more than any other terrestrial or arboreal.)

I say give them lots of substrate, and don't ask what they do with it.
 
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