Not good...

Chad Peace

Arachnosquire
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Jul 5, 2016
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My Chromatopelma Cyaneopubescens came today and its fine in its new enclosure but little did i know the shop gave away a free Nhandu chromatus sling (they had a short brake and if you ordered from them during the time they are away they will give a Nhandu Chromatus sling for free) the thing is i only know how to take care of my GBB please help.
 
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mistertim

Arachnobaron
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Sep 4, 2015
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My Chromatopelma Cyaneopubescens came today and its fine in its new enclosure but little did i know the shop gave away a free Nhandu chromatus sling that i have no idea how to take care of. Please help
Not a huge deal, at least they didn't send you a S. calceatum sling or something. :)

I don't have any Nhandus but my understanding is that you pretty much keep them like most other NW terrestrials, though they do apparently tend to like burrowing a bit so you'd want to provide plenty of sub. For a sling you'd want to keep the humidity up a bit more with dampening the sub a bit or wetting a bit of sphagnum moss, especially if its enclosure is too small for a water dish (though if you can fit in a dish, definitely do it)...like I said, pretty much like most NWs. They get pretty big and are apparently tend to have plenty of personality and a little attitude when they get bigger.

Obviously anyone who has them should chime in and correct me if I'm wrong. :p
 

Andrea82

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You can feed it pinhead crickets, small mealworms (make sure to crush the heads so they don't burrow), or prekilled larger crickets or mealworms.
 

mistertim

Arachnobaron
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Sep 4, 2015
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Okay what do i feed it? Its just under 1cm
Personally, for something that small I would go with small prekilled larger crickets. That's a tiny sling and I wouldn't want to take the chance of it getting hurt by prey until it molts at least once more. Good thing with prekilled crickets is it can get bigger faster as it has bigger meals and most slings have no problem with scavenging.

Just out of curiosity how many Ts do you currently have?
 

Chad Peace

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This is my 2nd T, i only wanted 1 to start with because it would help me get in to the hobby, but i didnt know about the free spider being part of my deal
 

mistertim

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Sep 4, 2015
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This is my 2nd T, i only wanted 1 to start with because it would help me get in to the hobby, but i didnt know about the free spider being part of my deal
Well, remember, if you feel overwhelmed for any reason and really just don't think you can care for it properly at this time and really just want to stick with 1 T for a while (no shame in that at all...you're new to the hobby) you can always give it to someone on here who would probably be happy to have it.
 

Chad Peace

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Well, remember, if you feel overwhelmed for any reason and really just don't think you can care for it properly at this time and really just want to stick with 1 T for a while (no shame in that at all...you're new to the hobby) you can always give it to someone on her who would probably be happy to have it.
Yeah, ill see how it goes, if i cant take care of it ill give it away
 

Trenor

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This is my 2nd T, i only wanted 1 to start with because it would help me get in to the hobby, but i didnt know about the free spider being part of my deal
You shouldn't have any trouble. They are an easy species to raise.

As mentioned, I'd keep it on lightly moist substrate in a small cup with good ventilation. Add something like a fake leaf or some long moss in a pile to give it somewhere to hide. At that size I would offer prey cut to the right size. Take care not to make the substrate too moist but other then that you should be fine.
 

Veribug

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Mar 14, 2016
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Ahhh you're an England dweller too so I know exactly which place you're on about :happy: I read about that, it's super duper easy to miss, whilst I'd normally advise you to take it as a lesson and read the websites before ordering, it's not made super clear and they should definitely mention it in the final order screen IMO (not in a small hyperlink on the main page...), so I really don't blame you for missing that info
 

Chad Peace

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Well its not all bad, if this is how i kick start my new hobby then so be it, plus ill learn a lot about keeping slings
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
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I received a 1/4" Lasiodora difficilis spiderling as a freebie and I knew nothing about keeping the genus and was never planning on having one. Often freebies aren't mentioned on the website, that was the case with me, so this happens frequently.
I was very concerned about my spiderling because they are a bit outside of my comfort zone - especially as adults. I was considering trying to give them away, but decided to keep them. I'm glad I did because I am really enjoying watching my little one grow up. I'm hoping that they are one of the 'calmer' individuals for the species later on.
You'll do okay. Nhandu are pretty straight forward from what I understand. Lots of people here have them and they will answer any questions, or concerns, that you might have.
They are a gorgeous tarantula when grown.
 

nicodimus22

Arachnomancer
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Sep 26, 2013
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I love slings. It's so much fun to watch them grow up, and it also eases you into the idea of having a big tarantula if you're a little nervous because it's a gradual process. I know that everyone tells beginners to avoid them, but I started with slings and found it to be pretty easy. Maybe it's just that the Grammostola slings are easy to raise.
 

mistertim

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I love slings. It's so much fun to watch them grow up, and it also eases you into the idea of having a big tarantula if you're a little nervous because it's a gradual process. I know that everyone tells beginners to avoid them, but I started with slings and found it to be pretty easy. Maybe it's just that the Grammostola slings are easy to raise.
Yeah I think it really depends on the genus and species. I would definitely not suggest an Avic sling to someone new, but something like a Grammostola or Brachypelma tend to be quite hardy. GBB slings are practically bullet proof...you could probably put them on a sub made up of broken glass and arsenic* and they'd be like "whatever, when's lunch?".





* Please do not do this.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Ahhh you're an England dweller too so I know exactly which place you're on about :happy: I read about that, it's super duper easy to miss, whilst I'd normally advise you to take it as a lesson and read the websites before ordering, it's not made super clear and they should definitely mention it in the final order screen IMO (not in a small hyperlink on the main page...), so I really don't blame you for missing that info
Ah ah, Bristol I suppose :angelic:
 

Andrea82

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Yeah I think it really depends on the genus and species. I would definitely not suggest an Avic sling to someone new, but something like a Grammostola or Brachypelma tend to be quite hardy. GBB slings are practically bullet proof...you could probably put them on a sub made up of broken glass and arsenic* and they'd be like "whatever, when's lunch?".





* Please do not do this.
About the GBB, in essence, it os true, but there is one thing which kills them off as well, and that's too much moisture. We've recently have a couple of first time GBB sling owners in the Netherlands who managed to kill their GBB slings because of the wet substrate, and having no way of avoiding ground surface in the form of leaves or branches.
 

mistertim

Arachnobaron
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Sep 4, 2015
Messages
551
About the GBB, in essence, it os true, but there is one thing which kills them off as well, and that's too much moisture. We've recently have a couple of first time GBB sling owners in the Netherlands who managed to kill their GBB slings because of the wet substrate, and having no way of avoiding ground surface in the form of leaves or branches.
Good point. Yeah, too much moisture is not good for a GBB. My GBB was my first sling and I accidentally made the sub too wet for a short period of time. But it had a little piece of cork and a small fake plant that it had webbed up so it could stay off the sub. I changed it out pretty quick though once I realized it.
 

Sana

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Oct 26, 2014
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Nhandus are so adorable! The folks here are dead on. Mine love to burrow and prefer slightly moister substrate. They are little eating machines as well. Mine will happily tackle prey bigger then they are. I started mine at .25" (about the same size as yours) with prekilled prey. They will eat anything that your GBB will eat. I gave each of mine a little piece of bark with a small hole under it and a few leaves and they happily rearranged things to their liking. All of mine had water dishes at that size and I have seen them drink more frequently then most of my other species. Just remember that like your GBB this is another food motivated species that will consider anything that moves to be potential prey. Don't put your fingers in the enclosure and you two will get along just fine.
 

Tarantula20

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Oct 19, 2014
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Nhandus are easy keep it the exact way you would GBB but with slightly higher humidity. And obviously when there adults a GBB can be in a semi arboreal but Nhandus are peer terrestrials. Good Luck!:)
 
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