Nocturnal viewing?

vtecgsr

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
200
I have a murinus and just as i read before buying it comes out during the night, ill flip the light on there she is out and about... Is there a special light i can use to view her? Like a red light, i have a black light but it doesnt seem to work...
 

Trey

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 20, 2005
Messages
292
I had the same problem with mine and I got a red light and that helps out alot. She still not out a whole lot but you can def see her at her entrance. I heard that T's can't see red but I don't know how much truth there is to it?
 

Scott C.

Arachnofloater
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 17, 2004
Messages
936
Red lights work good for night veiwing. They don't seem to register as light to the T's.
 

Cerbera

Arachnobaron
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Mar 12, 2005
Messages
541
YES ! Get a £12 infra red webcam (MSI star cam is perfect), and connect it to a PC in another room ! - Bright as you like easily recordable high(ish) quality video and monitoring with total darkness maintained in the T-room... what could be better than that ?? Spend a bit more and get one of those Creative motorised pan and tilt jobbies, but I don't know if it allows you to pan about remotely, and as opposed to automatically....
 
Last edited:

vtecgsr

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
200
Very cool, thanks for the replies... How much should i expect to pay for one? Do they produce a lot of heat?
 

Cerbera

Arachnobaron
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Mar 12, 2005
Messages
541
Very cool, thanks for the replies... How much should i expect to pay for one? Do they produce a lot of heat?
If you get any of the cams I'm talking about, they all use LED's and produce zero heat. Likewise - I use a red LED array light for manual inspections at night, that stays on all the time, and also emits no heat...
 

DrAce

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
768
Spider Eye Sensitivity

I've just found a neat paper on the range of spider eye sensitivity. I have the PDF, but it's too big for me to upload here, so I will have to promise to send it to people who request it. (J Gen Physiol. 1969 Jul;54(1):1-32.)

It's slightly old (1969) and on Wolf Spiders (Lycosa baltimoriana, L. miami, and L. carolinensi), but I'm sure it's relevant to us here.


In their own words, here is the conclusion:
There remains the question that originally set off this investigation: do the experiments of Kaistner (1950) show that spiders can see color with their anterior median eyes (or with any other eyes?). On the basis of our results, spiders cannot, at least not with their anterior median eyes alone. It may be objected that Kaistner's behavioral experiments were done with jumping spiders, whereas our electrophysiological experiments used wolf spiders. However, the preliminary spectral sensitivities recorded from anterior median eyes of jumping spiders in this laboratory (DeVoe and Zvargulis, 1967) appear much like the more extensive results on wolf spiders reported here ... The main difference between wolf and jumping spiders is that the jumping spiders have a maximum sensitivity in the visible wavelength region at 530 nm, instead of at 505 nm as for the wolf spiders. Otherwise, as in the wolf spiders, there is an abrupt rise in sensitivity below 420 nm (which we could not fully measure in the ultraviolet with the tungsten light source available at that time), and chromatic light adaptations of 1 log unit ... do not change relative spectral sensitivities. It would therefore appear that jumping spiders also lack two or more, spectrally different, cell populations in their anterior median eyes.

So to summarise:
Spiders can detect visible light (610 - 400 nm or so) but they can't differentiate between red, green, or blue as we can. The paper outlines how the sensitivity to red is much lower than that of other colours, which probably means that it's safe to shine red lights on them.
 

vtecgsr

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
200
I've just found a neat paper on the range of spider eye sensitivity. I have the PDF, but it's too big for me to upload here, so I will have to promise to send it to people who request it. (J Gen Physiol. 1969 Jul;54(1):1-32.)

It's slightly old (1969) and on Wolf Spiders (Lycosa baltimoriana, L. miami, and L. carolinensi), but I'm sure it's relevant to us here.


In their own words, here is the conclusion:
There remains the question that originally set off this investigation: do the experiments of Kaistner (1950) show that spiders can see color with their anterior median eyes (or with any other eyes?). On the basis of our results, spiders cannot, at least not with their anterior median eyes alone. It may be objected that Kaistner's behavioral experiments were done with jumping spiders, whereas our electrophysiological experiments used wolf spiders. However, the preliminary spectral sensitivities recorded from anterior median eyes of jumping spiders in this laboratory (DeVoe and Zvargulis, 1967) appear much like the more extensive results on wolf spiders reported here ... The main difference between wolf and jumping spiders is that the jumping spiders have a maximum sensitivity in the visible wavelength region at 530 nm, instead of at 505 nm as for the wolf spiders. Otherwise, as in the wolf spiders, there is an abrupt rise in sensitivity below 420 nm (which we could not fully measure in the ultraviolet with the tungsten light source available at that time), and chromatic light adaptations of 1 log unit ... do not change relative spectral sensitivities. It would therefore appear that jumping spiders also lack two or more, spectrally different, cell populations in their anterior median eyes.

So to summarise:
Spiders can detect visible light (610 - 400 nm or so) but they can't differentiate between red, green, or blue as we can. The paper outlines how the sensitivity to red is much lower than that of other colours, which probably means that it's safe to shine red lights on them.
Thanks for that info...

If you get any of the cams I'm talking about, they all use LED's and produce zero heat. Likewise - I use a red LED array light for manual inspections at night, that stays on all the time, and also emits no heat...
That sounds reeaalllly cool... wow, where can i get one and how much should i pay?
 

vtecgsr

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
200
I just went to walmart and got a 25 watt party bulb... its kinda warm but not really signifacant enough to worry... but, is that too many watts?
 

Natemass

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 16, 2006
Messages
619
for night view i use a red light thats on my head lamp, i payd 15 for it and i also use it when i go out at night to herp or look for other things, i think its energizer and its all led lights. yes 25 watts should be fine


Nate
 
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