Newby Seeks Advice

MaineFlyersFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2017
Messages
0
Hello Folks,
I am a newby. I currently keep a Scolopendra Subspinipes (Vietnamese Centipede) and numerous reptiles. I have done extensive research on keeping and displaying tarantula's and am ready to jump into the hobby. Unfortunately, here in Maine you cannot possess ANY without a importation and possession permit. So, I am preparing to submit my application this weekend and I was hoping those of you that are experienced would make a recommendation on a species to keep. I am looking for a terrestrial species (New World) and want something that is docile, less aggressive and generally friendly. I also am interested in the more colorful It's. So, I am leaning heavily towards the Brachypelma Smithi.
Any suggestions from you veteran keepers? Any other species that are similar in temperament, care requirements etc ?
I have read hundreds of web pages, various media etc but what I really would like is to hear from people that are actually keeping T's and have real life experience with them.
Any suggestions out there aside from the Smithi ? Thank you for taking the time!
 

CWilson1351

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 23, 2017
Messages
454
I'm a fan of Grammastola pulchripes. They aren't super colorful but meet all your other criteria from all I have read and seen. Another is Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. They are very nice looking, web a lot, however they are also fairly skittish. My sling kicked hairs at me a couple times.
Those are the only two I have any experience with that meet any of your want list.
 

nicodimus22

Arachnomancer
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
709
I find B. Boehemi (and B. emilia although it's not quite as vibrant) to be more attractive than B. smithi, so you might want to look into them and see what you think. G. pulchripes is awesome but might not be colorful enough for you. P. sazimai is incredible looking, IMO, although it's not as established as the others in the hobby yet.

Also, I'd like to point out that tarantulas are very unpredictable animals, so it's hard to guarantee docility. Some species tend to be docile, but individuals of that species can be aggressive. Some individuals tend to be docile, but one day can turn around and get defensive out of nowhere. Just something to keep in mind.
 
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BrockiePelma

Arachnosquire
Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
69
My golden rules for the hobby:

1. The tarantula itself know whats best,dont bother fighting with it on where to place the water dish,if it digs,let it,if it doesnt want to eat,dont force it,etc.

2. Temperament is relative,i have had 'docile' species who is calm for a day and grumpy the next,a 'skittish' little turd who is lightning fast for a day and sluggish at the next,etc.

3. Always assume it'll bite.

4. Most infos found in care sheets are guides, not requirements,specially the humidity.if you are comfortable in the environment,chances are,your Ts will bw too(specially for brachys).

5. They've been evolving for thousands and millions of years,give them the respect they deserve.

Given you've taken care of other pets before,im pretty sure u already applied some,if not all of those already,just remember,no matter how many articles and books you read, experience will always be the best teacher.

As for your question,newbies cant go wrong with the brachypelma and grammostol genus.
 

MaineFlyersFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2017
Messages
0
I'm a fan of Grammastola pulchripes. They aren't super colorful but meet all your other criteria from all I have read and seen. Another is Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. They are very nice looking, web a lot, however they are also fairly skittish. My sling kicked hairs at me a couple times.
Those are the only two I have any experience with that meet any of your want list.
Thank you thank you!!!! I am very intrigued by both of those two options especially the Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. I hadn't consider that species at all so thank you ! I like that they are seen in the open in the enclosure more often than the Smithi. Definitely one I need to add to my list.
 

MaineFlyersFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2017
Messages
0
I find B. Boehemi (and B. emilia although it's not quite as vibrant) to be more attractive than B. smithi, so you might want to look into them and see what you think. G. pulchripes is awesome but might not be colorful enough for you. P. sazimai is incredible looking, IMO, although it's not as established as the others in the hobby yet.

Also, I'd like to point out that tarantulas are very unpredictable animals, so it's hard to guarantee docility. Some species tend to be docile, but individuals of that species can be aggressive. Some individuals tend to be docile, but one day can turn around and get defensive out of nowhere. Just something to keep in mind.
Thank you!!! I am definitely adding the G. Pulchripes to the list. Very interesting. I appreciate the suggestions.
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,611
I am looking for a terrestrial species (New World) and want something that is docile, less aggressive and generally friendly.
I don't know if any Ts are "generally friendly" you could buy a B.smithi and end up with a nutcase. Each specimen has its own personality, but with tarantulas it's a look not touch kind of relationship so it's not usually an issue.
Hello Folks,
I am a newby. I currently keep a Scolopendra Subspinipes (Vietnamese Centipede) and numerous reptiles. I also am interested in the more colorful
If you can handle that kind of centipede, I'm sure you will be fine with an intermediate tarantula species. I would highly recommend an A.geniculata. They are colorful and eat like pigs. They do well in a pretty moist environment and can handle some drought periods. They are more predatory then defensive, and grow very fast. This is one of my freshly molted females, gorgeous right?
 

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MaineFlyersFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2017
Messages
0
My golden rules for the hobby:

1. The tarantula itself know whats best,dont bother fighting with it on where to place the water dish,if it digs,let it,if it doesnt want to eat,dont force it,etc.

2. Temperament is relative,i have had 'docile' species who is calm for a day and grumpy the next,a 'skittish' little turd who is lightning fast for a day and sluggish at the next,etc.

3. Always assume it'll bite.

4. Most infos found in care sheets are guides, not requirements,specially the humidity.if you are comfortable in the environment,chances are,your Ts will bw too(specially for brachys).

5. They've been evolving for thousands and millions of years,give them the respect they deserve.

Given you've taken care of other pets before,im pretty sure u already applied some,if not all of those already,just remember,no matter how many articles and books you read, experience will always be the best teacher.

As for your question,newbies cant go wrong with the brachypelma and grammostol genus.
All very good points. Thank you for replying ! I have already learned of a few options I hadn't considered. I honestly don't intend on handing the T that I end up with any more than absolutely necessary. My enjoyment, like with my Scolopendra, comes from creating naturalistic environments, feeding and observing the animals in the vivarium's I create mimicry their ideal conditions. My wife thinks I'm nuts but creating Vivs and terrarium's has become quite a passion of mine. Thanks again !
 

MaineFlyersFan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2017
Messages
0
I don't know if any Ts are "generally friendly" you could buy a B.smithi and end up with a nutcase. Each specimen has its own personality, but with tarantulas it's a look not touch kind of relationship so it's not usually an issue.

If you can handle that kind of centipede, I'm sure you will be fine with an intermediate tarantula species. I would highly recommend an A.geniculata. They are colorful and eat like pigs. They do well in a pretty moist environment and can handle some drought periods. They are more predatory then defensive, and grow very fast. This is one of my freshly molted females, gorgeous right?
Thank you! I probably could have worded that better. I guess I mean just not one of the more aggressive, psychotic species. Your pictures are excellent. Very beautiful.
 

Charlottesweb17

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 31, 2017
Messages
34
I am new as well to the hobby and have had my slings over a month and love my choice for first Ts l.parahybana.
Plan on getting more Ts.
 

Charlie69

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 1, 2016
Messages
86
My favorite brachy is boehmei. But no matter what you choose, I would recommend a juvenile. Most beginner t's grow painfully slow.
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
675
The B. smithi is a good choice. As others have said, personalities are unique to the individual. There are certain species that TEND to be more mellow, but there's never a guarantee. I love the classic smithi! Lots of people have them for a reason. They're just so neat looking:)
 

Haemus

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
128
Like others have mentioned, docility in Ts is very much a gamble. My B. smithi is most quick to act defensively in my collection, and that includes my G. pulchripes and A. geniculata. All three are simple to care for, but the G. pulchripes gets my vote just out of personal preference.

Tough luck with the Metro division this year. Please do my leafs a solid and wish some bad voodoo on those Pens tomorrow :)
 

The Grym Reaper

Arachnoreaper
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Messages
3,888
I am looking for a terrestrial species (New World) and want something that is docile, less aggressive and generally friendly.
I don't know if any Ts are "generally friendly" you could buy a B.smithi and end up with a nutcase.
I am that guy, my B. smithi is evil, she doesn't kick hairs, she just goes straight to threat postures and slapping...
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,870
Thank you thank you!!!! I am very intrigued by both of those two options especially the Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. I hadn't consider that species at all so thank you ! I like that they are seen in the open in the enclosure more often than the Smithi. Definitely one I need to add to my list.
Both are in the open most of the time, and either one is capable of deciding it wants to disappear. My B. smithi literally has never used its hide, not once. My GBB is in its hide a lot, but I still see her plenty often...many others never see their GBB hide.

Truth is that most, if not all the best beginner species are quite visible most of the time, especially as they grow and gain size. GBB has a notorious appetite, B. smithi are very good eaters as adults, but will fill up faster and fast longer generally. B. smithi will also live longer. Both are super easy to keep (as is every species I will mention), hence the beginner moniker(s). Either can be flicky, but I wouldn't consider either to be particularly bad.


Thank you!!! I am definitely adding the G. Pulchripes to the list. Very interesting. I appreciate the suggestions.
Pulchripes are an exceptional option. They're very very good eaters, on the same line as GBB, and while they may be capable of fasting, IME they're really similar to GBB. Where the GBB is an active webber, a pulchripes is an active construction worker, moving sub around and digging holes, they really are a more active species. Yet, they are also one of the calmest, almost docile species (someone will say theirs isn't, but that's not typical). They may not be flashy colored, but their yellow knee banding looks great, and keeps looking better and better as the t gains size, so they are more than just a big brown spider....and a female pulchripes can exceed 7" and be quite bulky....great display species for sure and definitely not a pet rock species. And they almost never flick hair.
Some other good species to look at are G. pulchra, which is a calm slow growing good eating, bulky, jet black spider. B. vagans fits that bill as well, although vagans is a bit more skittish...but not any more than a GBB.
B. emelia is striking, although typically a pet rock....boehmei is striking, but flicky devils that earned their common name fire leg not because of the colors, but rather because of their burning hairs.

B. albiceps are also good, while slow growing bad eating slings, they're great eaters as adults and one gorgeous display species...just get a juvie or adult. Temperament is the same as a vagans...skittish, but not excessively so and not very flicky.

If you don't mind a little feistier spider, but still an easy one to keep as a beginner, N. chromatus are inexpensive, fast growing, superb eating beautiful display spiders. Genics are similar....LPs are as well, although an LP totally lacks any kind of coloring at all.

T. cyaneolum isn't an easy one to find, but it just may be the calmest, most docile species on the planet, and they're gorgeous blue with a huge gold mirror patch on their rumps....super easy going, virtually never hide, and are great eaters.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
632
I'm a fan of Grammastola pulchripes. They aren't super colorful but meet all your other criteria from all I have read and seen. Another is Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. They are very nice looking, web a lot, however they are also fairly skittish. My sling kicked hairs at me a couple times.
Those are the only two I have any experience with that meet any of your want list.
Exfrigginscuse me
http://arachnoboards.com/gallery/g-pulchripes-legs-at-4-inches.38831/
http://arachnoboards.com/gallery/babys-first-superworm-3.39180/
http://arachnoboards.com/gallery/resized952016101495235205.36157/
http://arachnoboards.com/gallery/noel.37581/
http://arachnoboards.com/gallery/grammostola-pulchripes.32642/
 

CWilson1351

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 23, 2017
Messages
454
Don't get me wrong, I love the colors of G. pulchripes, but compared to GBB they aren't quite as vibrant. C. cyaneopubescens was my first* tarantula. I waited a week and saw the beautiful Black/brown and Gold of G. pulchripes and didn't hesitate. In fact, I fell in love to the point that I now have 3 of them compared to my 1 GBB.


*GBB was my first choice based on recommended beginner Ts, I also bought a P. fasciata that day... Not necessarily the wisest thing I've done admittedly, but so far it has gone well.
 
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