Newbie question about T's

Baphomet

Arachnosquire
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Feb 22, 2003
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Hey all, I have been a Herper for more than 10 years (snakes), but I am new to the world of Tarantula's...

I have a simple question about this hobby/trade.

Why is it that all tarantula's are referred to by thier scientific names and not thier common names?

Although most of us who raise snakes do know the scientific names, for the most part it is far more common to refer to them by thier common name.

Why the difference with T's?
 

Mojo Jojo

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The problem arises because there can be so different common names for the same species. Some common names are universally accepted, and you will hear them used:

red knee (B. smithi), Greenbottle Blue (C. cyanopubescens (although you will here bottlebrush occaisionally)), Rosey (G. rosea)...


If you tell me that you have a giant white knee, I might be thinking A. geniculata, when you meant N. colorvustrum.

If you say A. geniculata, I know exactly what you are talking about.

I think there is more consistancy in the Herp world between sci. and common names. So there isn't a problem using common name.

Jon
 

Steve Nunn

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Originally posted by Devildoll
plus we have huge egos and think we sound smart when we use them :)
LOL, I like that one! The classification of the tarantulas is in it's infancy in comparison to herps, many changes, happening all the time. The other issue is that the hobby itself is still in it's infancy. This combined with the fact that new T's make it to the hobby every other day and before you know it, the term "red rump" applies to over ten different species! So, hypothetically speaking, we might change to "white knee" and before you know it there are ten different "white knee's" in the hobby.

When you combine these two issues, it becomes the best option to follow the scientific world as it winds it's way through the taxonomy of the tarantulas.

I believe the American Arachnological Society (AAS) has started to cement the common names of tarantulas via a running work that can be found a the ATS site http://www.atshq.org (click the "downloads" link) although you won't find these names used in Europe, they prefer the scientific names because of the accuracy.

Hope this helps,
Steve
 
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Code Monkey

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As has been pointed out, there is more consistency with common names in herps versus Ts. Even the ATS project is far from perfect as they decide what the "proper" common name is for a given species, and some of their "common" names are from common. E.g Stan Shultz says with "authority" that there is no such thing as a Chilean rosehair even though probably 80% or more of the keepers will refer to G. rosea as such.

With some 800+ species world wide, and some 200 of them having been in the hobby at one time or another and no set standard for common names, it avoids a lot of confusion to refer to all but the most standardised with their scientific name. And, sadly, even that isn't a full proof method as some people will continue to use an older name after it has changed, or insist that they know somebody who knows somebody who says that a widely known species is going to be changed to "foo" and starts calling it as such without anyone having any idea what they're up to.
 

Baphomet

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I would like to thank those of you who took the time to answer my basic "Aracno-question" without the flames that a seemingly simple question garners at many other sites.

As I explained, for well over 10 years, I have been involved in the word of herps, and I often conduct educational classes to all levels of education regarding snakes, thier taxonomy, classifications, and most importantly, the myths and misinformation of our reptilian friends.

All too often, many a pet owner who is new to our somewhat eclectic form of pet-ownership is met with scoffs and or those who view beginers in this form of pet-ownership as morons.

I have never forgot what it is like to be a new snake owner, and I spend countless hours assisting those who, regardless of how "basic" an answer may seem; in giving them the best information I can regarding thier questions/concerns.

Thank you to those here involved and well-versed with Arachnids who apparently also are willing to assist beginners. This is the attitude that helps solidify and differentiate those who take this form of pet-ownership seriously.

...of course, the plus we have huge egos and think we sound smart when we use them line gave me a chuckle as well! :p
 

Gillian

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Baphomet,
I guess, for me, it has a snake analogy to it. For some, perhaps not so well versed, you can say "Ball Python" or "Royal Python", and many will think its 2 different snakes, when in reality, its one and the same. Likewise, someone can say, "Oh. I have a Red Tail." More than likely, without the scientific name, you'll be going, "Uhm, which one."
Although, Devildoll's answer was funny..*lmao*
Peace,
Gillian
p.s., the ability to ask very simple questions, without getting flamed or, ridiculed, is a big reason I like it here. Simple questions aren't necessarily an invitation for shame, they are instead an honest request for information. :)
 
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Tranz

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Unfortunately, because scientific names are so hard to spell and remember, people only tend to use them when they are familiar with a species. I feel this puts up a barrier to people learning about tarantulas. When the 9-year-old girl was on Jay Leno and was asked what kind of T it was said, "Grammablablablablabla", some people who might have thought, "Yeah, I'll go get a rosehair" or "our petshop has a rosehair", instead thought, "huh?".
 

Steve Nunn

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Originally posted by Tranz
When the 9-year-old girl was on Jay Leno and was asked what kind of T it was said, "Grammablablablablabla", some people who might have thought, "Yeah, I'll go get a rosehair" or "our petshop has a rosehair", instead thought, "huh?".
Hi Tranz,
I understand your point here, but when Elizabeth Mule used scientific names instead of common, she expressed several valid points by this choice. She showed, as a 9 year old, that anyone can eventually pick these terms up, as is needed if getting into serious keeping, which Elizabeth is doing.

Also, by her use of such terms, Elizabeth may have pushed any people interested enough to buy a tarantula, into more research before they actually make a purchase. I would strongly disagree with anyone just seeing a big hairy spider simply called a "rosie", then liking it enough to fly down to the nearest shop to buy one. Hopefully she aroused peoples interest enough to further research those big hairy critters with the funny names.

I really do see you point and I believe it too is valid, I just wanted to share some other points of view.

Thanks,
Steve
 

caligulathegod

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I'm going to piggyback a question onto this thread.

"Sling" is obviously short for "Spiderling" but is that a 'net abreviation (like LOL) or do you actually call them "slings" in conversation?
 

Kugellager

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Baphomet,

All too often, many a pet owner who is new to our somewhat eclectic form of pet-ownership is met with scoffs and or those who view beginers in this form of pet-ownership as morons
These types that slam newbies don't last too long around here...at the very least they don't get away with slamming newbies for very long...they either get pasted to the wall or banned if they don't get the hint. The moderators and some of the more experienced members take care of that problem in short order...The Watering Hole is a bit different but it keeps the OT stuff out of the forums.

caligulathegod,

Yes sling is used in regular conversation....

John
];')
 

Tranz

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Originally posted by caligulathegod
I'm going to piggyback a question onto this thread.

"Sling" is obviously short for "Spiderling" but is that a 'net abreviation (like LOL) or do you actually call them "slings" in conversation?
It depends on the level of one's tarantula knowledge, familiarity, and elitist nonchalance. The levels are as follows.

Newbie - "baby spider"

Level 1 - "spiderling"

Level 2 - "sling"

Level 3 - "ling"

Level 4 - "ing"

Level 5 - "ng"

Level 6 - "g"

Level 7 - " " (this is my favorite)

Hope this helps.
 

Mister Internet

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Originally posted by Baphomet
I would like to thank those of you who took the time to answer my basic "Aracno-question" without the flames that a seemingly simple question garners at many other sites.
Baph, welcome to Arachnopets... the flames come later. :)

Seriously though, there's no such thing as a stupid question here... I've seen the same hobbyists answer the same questions dozens of times already, but they always do it again with a smile on their face... this is truly a nurturing community... :)

Of course, I may be slightly biased. ;)
 

Nixy

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Originally posted by Tranz
It depends on the level of one's tarantula knowledge, familiarity, and elitist nonchalance. The levels are as follows.

Newbie - "baby spider"

Level 1 - "spiderling"

Level 2 - "sling"

Level 3 - "ling"

Level 4 - "ing"

Level 5 - "ng"

Level 6 - "g"

Level 7 - " " (this is my favorite)

Hope this helps.
What No level eight?! Which of course would or Should be "Lil cute round butt bug bug"

And Baphomet welcome :)

I like this board Alot. It's a great place where questions are answered and your not made to feel like an idiot for asking.
As Mister Internet said. There's No such thing as a stupid question. And the snears and flamming and bullcrap on the other boards are usualy from snobs that have a Bitty bit of knewledge under their belts, egos the size of mountains and Very selective memory.
They forget that at one point in their lves they were nebies too and Didn't know crap.
I'm learning.
I love learning.
And I am Still learning about subjects I Know. Hopefuly. I'll never stop learning.

Then where would the fun be?
 

Nathan Danger

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Seriously though, there's no such thing as a stupid question here... I've seen the same hobbyists answer the same questions dozens of times already, but they always do it again with a smile on their face... this is truly a nurturing community...

word...i have asked some questions and the people on here rock....i read it everyday although i rarely post....you guys rock....i love you...best friends forever!
 

MrT

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Aug 13, 2002
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Hey Baphomet,
Welcome to our not so little group. Good to have you aboard.
We're birthday brothers, Nov 26th. Except I'm 1954.

Do you own any T's yet? If so, what you got?
I have to keep a list of mine taped to my computer, so I can give the scientific names when refering to them. The latin names just kick my butt. But I keep trying to learn them. LOL :?


Ernie
 

Wade

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There may be a reson why the T-keeping community is a little more cozy with each other than the herp community tends to be, and it has to do with the animals themselves.

A big time herp-breeder doesn't nesasarily have to deal much with the newbies and beginers, or even with other big time breeders. Once you have your breeding stock, you only occasionally need to replenish adults, or else establish new pairs of more species to expand your stock. You have your established breeders, and your established customers. It's easy to insulate yourself. I used to work for a high-end herp breeder, and belive me, some of those guys are competative, secretive, and sometimes outright sneaky. Don't get me wrong, there's a lot of great folks in the herp scene as well. I'm simply saying it's much easier for a herper to be an elitist snob, because the means are there. (None of this is intended as a slam against herpers...I'm one myself!)

Not that the T hobby doen't have it's share of petty jelousies and ugliness, but it's not quite as common. My theory is that it relates to the short life of tarantula males. All T breeders are going to need new males all the time, they simply can't have established "breeding pairs". This generates a lot more communication between the breeders themselves and between the hobbyists. If we have females, we're always looking for males. If we have males, we're looking for somewhere to send them. Since many of these transactions don't involve money, they can't really be described as "sales". End result: the serious T hobbyist has to be alot more social than the herper. Subsequently, we tend to be (as a group) alot more friendly to the ousiders. After all, they might someday be the ones sending us that much needed rare male tarantula!

Wade
 

Gillian

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Originally posted by Wade
Don't get me wrong, there's a lot of great folks in the herp scene as well.
Wade
Wade,
I agree. I will add that, Devildoll falls into the above. He's helping me with my intractable BRB. This is no fault of the snake itself, just the squirrelly damn owner who had him before. If a animal, already known to be a bit snappy and defensive, as a baby, is not given adequate enough handling, can we blame it for turning out to be snappy? No.
Peace,
Gillian
(this is not saying that several other herpers on this board haven't been helpful to me; you all have)
 
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