Newbie cannot keep Deathstalker?

k3v1n

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 10, 2006
Messages
2
Hi there, just want to ask newbie can or cannot keep deathstalker?
Please state out why newbie can or cannot keep them...thankss :)
 

Murziukas

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 4, 2005
Messages
452
the question is equal to following one: can children (age group from 10 to 16 years) play with firearms? Basicly - NOT. Responsability is a thing to consider, not the age or experience in scorpions. Eventhrough I think there is no big need to have L. Quinquestriatus in the very begining. It's better to start with babycurus, centruroides and hottentota if you want something more exiting than p. imperator or h. arizonensis.
 

Thoth

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 9, 2005
Messages
1,323
I'm normally a t guy but this is the same advice I'd give a newbie who wanted a pokie or other aggressive t.

No a newbie can't or rather shouldn't keep a deathstalker. As newbie you aren't familiar enough with the properly handling of a scorpion let alone an aggressive one. Combine a potent venom, inexperience in handling a scorpion and an aggresive scorpion that is an accident waiting to happen. Also inexperience in handling may allow for an escape which puts everyone in the house in danger of getting stung.

Yes there is a coolness factor in saying I own a deathstalker but that not a reason to own any pet let alone a potentially dangerous one.

There are plenty of interesting beginner scorpions besides an emporer just check those threads out.

I'm an experienced t keeper and would never think of starting in scorpions with a deathstalker or any hot scorpion for that matter.
 

ScorpDude

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 27, 2004
Messages
948
If he wants to die then why not?

A sting would be fairly inevitable.
 

k3v1n

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 10, 2006
Messages
2
how bout if dont handle it?
i personally have 2 spinifer and 1 imperator, im from malaysia, here is really hard to find other species besides this two.:wall:
 

parabuthus

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 16, 2005
Messages
749
Murziukas said:
the question is equal to following one: can children (age group from 10 to 16 years) play with firearms? Basicly - NOT. Responsability is a thing to consider, not the age or experience in scorpions. Eventhrough I think there is no big need to have L. Quinquestriatus in the very begining. It's better to start with babycurus, centruroides and hottentota if you want something more exiting than p. imperator or h. arizonensis.

Hadrurus arizonensis is a very exciting species of scorpion!
 

Cirith Ungol

Ministry of Fluffy Bunnies
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 22, 2004
Messages
3,889
ScorpDude said:
If he wants to die then why not?

A sting would be fairly inevitable.
Well that's one mad comment! First I don't believe your nonchalance in this and secondly IF he gets seriously harmed or even killed by the scorpion it's certainly not gonna do the hobby any good, whereever he's from.
 

Crotalus

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 14, 2002
Messages
2,434
In theory yes. Scorpions are very difficult to get tagged from unless you pick them up. But anyone should have a bit experience from scorpions before getting a Leiurus. So my final answer would be no since there is moments of unpacking and cleaning the cage which means you need to get the scorpion out of the cage.
 

Murziukas

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 4, 2005
Messages
452
It is not if you keep in mind that it is recomended for beginners ;)
Of course it is and it's one in my wish list, but you know, I already kad L. Quinquestriatus in my collection, so.... ;):D
parabuthus said:
Hadrurus arizonensis is a very exciting species of scorpion!
 

Scorpfanatic

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
1,794
nothing is safe.. even when its really safe... people take it for granted that its safe and something might happen one day when accident happen... probably when your scorps having a real nad day! :p~
 

parabuthus

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 16, 2005
Messages
749
Murziukas said:
It is not if you keep in mind that it is recomended for beginners ;)
Of course it is and it's one in my wish list, but you know, I already kad L. Quinquestriatus in my collection, so.... ;):D
It is actually a species recommended for beginner, intermediate and expert keepers, mate. Not just beginners ;) .

It is large, powerful, aggressive, very active and envenomates it's prey. For those reasons it is just as "exciting" as any other scorpion species.
 

Murziukas

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 4, 2005
Messages
452
how can anything that is recomended for novice be cool? Like to hell with CZ, Browning, Makarov and Colt, I need Desert Eagle!
;) Of course it is and I would like to have one, but I guess I'm that "other case".
 

TarantuChimp

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 12, 2003
Messages
149
Well anyone can keep a death stalker if you can afford to buy one, I got my A.A the other day but its at home and I let my dad who has experience look after it. i wont bring it to uni with me and endanger my housemates.

experience is the Key.....cos who in there right mind if they dont the reading will handle one Honestly and when it comes to maintenace its only common sence you can easly put them in a 2nd container while you clean.
 

micjoe

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 1, 2005
Messages
276
I currently have an A.Australis and just acquired a Death Stalker. An scorpion, invertbrate Enthusiast are the ones that keep these unique scorpions. If you are wanting one to impress your friends or to just say, "I have the most dangerous scorpion available." You are getting it for all the wrong reasons.

These scorpions are very fast and as well as the A.Australis. They should not be sold to someone who is not experienced handling scorpions, and not aware of the danger. If you have scorpions and are comfortable handling them, and are aware of the danger, and will let your friends/ family members aware of this danger, then you can get one, but just to have one. If you have had Emps, maybe Hairy Scorpion, and are very interested in the hobby, and are comfortable, just be aware of the danger.

Someone who has never gotten a scorpion should not have one of these, end of story.

Good luck!
 

Prymal

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 17, 2005
Messages
2,759
Heya Kevin,

Listen bro, first, i've been keeping dozens of L. quins for many years and have more specimens than a person should ever have and trust me, they're not all that! They're actually a bit boring when compared to the members of active and interesting genera like Centruroides and Mesobuthus. And, they're definitely not as cool as species such as a full-grown adult fem Heterometrus longimanus or as interesting as a group of Mesobuthus martensii!
If you're looking for an exciting group of Scorps, try Centruroides or Mesobuthus - at least they tend to be active and not as seclusive as L. quins. Also, L. quins are nice but nothing to brag about really - just another yellow desert scorpion. Hell, H. arizonensis or H. spadix is more impressive in size and activity.
Lastly, I'm not going to tell you not to get one if that's what you really want but first, decide why you'd want such a boring scorp and if you do decide to acquire an L. quin, REALIZE that this scorpion demands respect and will tolerate few mistakes from novice or experienced keepers. Good luck!

Luc
 

Prymal

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 17, 2005
Messages
2,759
Heya Tadas-

Bro, I live in the nastiest part of Detroit and trust me, whether a gun's a cheapie Mexican SNSp. or a DE, they kill just the same! 350-600 people get dropped here in the city annually and trust me, very few can afford a DE but those USD 50 throw-away Mexican cheapies account for the highest body counts. DE looks nice but it is still just a gun and all guns kill whether they cost USD 50 or USD 1000!
Also, all of this crap about recommended species for certain experience categories is just that - recommendations not rules. Let me tell you, after many years of keeping captive inverts, venomous snakes, etc. I can assure you with some authority that some of the most interesting and fascinating species in any imposed category-scheme are those over-looked by the "pros" and relegated down to novice level experience.
I've kept many "hot" herps and to this day, the most interesting are the lowly copperheads recommended for novice "hot" herp keepers.
People can say what they want but a L. quin would be a bit hard-pressed to compare with C. vittatus, H. spadix, H. spinifer or M. martensii in interesting behaviors and activity levels. As for L. quin comparing with H. arizonensis - no comparison really! Hadrurus arizonensis is large, powerful, active and very beautiful scorpion that belongs in the care of any keeper looking for something interesting and truly impressive. So, it doesn't have medically-significant venom or the ability to kill you if you make a mistake - in my books, not being killed if you make a mistake is a great deal "cooler" than lying in a hospital bed looking like a very uncool fool!

Luc
 

micjoe

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 1, 2005
Messages
276
Well put Luc, I would agree LQ, are not nearly as exciting as M. martensii , I have two, and a b.jacksoni. The Hairy Scorps, look very aggressive. I think the A.Australis is one of the meanest looking scorps out their, but again it is "HOT". Be aware.
 

thesupermonkey

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 8, 2006
Messages
51
Murziukas said:
how can anything that is recomended for novice be cool? Like to hell with CZ, Browning, Makarov and Colt, I need Desert Eagle!
;) Of course it is and I would like to have one, but I guess I'm that "other case".
I'm sure there are many instances of complete novices successfully keeping dangerous species. But that's not the issue... the issue is maintaining a healthy respect for the critter (even my lowly Emp).

I'm sorry but you sound completely juvenile. In everything I've read, in almost every case, accidental stinging/pinches/bites are due to a lack of respect for the animal (or scorp in this case). I haven't read one solid reason why you're interested in this species.

Get it if you can respect it, but it sounds like you're going to end up disappointed and/or hospitalized.
 

Prymal

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 17, 2005
Messages
2,759
Heya Joe,

You know, I could never understand how keeping a potentially dangerous animal makes a person "cool" or "macho"? My first intro to "hot" scorps back in '98 occurred when a guy decided to acquire 4 adult fem P. transvaalicus to be "cool". Needless to say, eventually he called me up and begged me to take 'em off his hands because he was afraid they'd squirt venom in his eyes and blind him! LOL
When I got to his digs, all 4 were dehydrated and near death because he was too afraid to open their containers (they were still crammed into shipping containers) to feed them or give them a bit of water! Very "cool" dude was he! LOL
I can't begin to list homes i've had to find for unwanted rattlers, coppers, etc. from people that wanted to be "cool" then discovered that being this sort of "cool" goes with a big responsibility and sometimes, a potential danger as well.
In my opinion, all scorps have something interesting about them regardless of their ability to kill/not kill their keepers. After all these long years of keeping inverts, I still haven't found any scorp as impressive as a full-grown adult fem emperor!!!

Luc
 
Top