New T owner

Longislandboi85

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
1
Hey everybody!

Great forum, I actually lurked (as a non member for about a year) before I signed up. Shortly after that (about 2 weeks ago now) I brought home my first T. It is a G. Rosea, probably about 4 1/2"-5" in size. Sex is unknown, but was given the name "freddy" by it's first owner. So probably a male. Funny to say, but it turned out to be a purchase/rescue. Not that im a expert, but. It was living in a 40 breeder, with wood chips.

Still hasn't eaten yet, I am not concerned. As I've read they can go months without eating. It does spider things, maybe it will chow down on a roach next week. Or maybe it will molt. Beats me.

M
 

Rittdk01

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 4, 2016
Messages
264
I have two Rosies. I remember my big one didn't eat for the first two months I had it. Never molted either, so not sure if it's a boy or girl. Smaller Rosie is a great eater and big eats a cricket a week. Dry Eco earth or similar works great for sub. A hide and a water dish is all it will need to be happy. Hope you enjoy the new pet :)
 

Longislandboi85

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
1
I have two Rosies. I remember my big one didn't eat for the first two months I had it. Never molted either, so not sure if it's a boy or girl. Smaller Rosie is a great eater and big eats a cricket a week. Dry Eco earth or similar works great for sub. A hide and a water dish is all it will need to be happy. Hope you enjoy the new pet :)
I have read that eco earth was the way to go. So, i made one brick of it. A little on the dry side. Iirc, it called for 16 cups of water. I made my batch with 13, and left it in the sun for 4-5 hours.

I have enough left over to fill two smaller deli cups (theres a reptile expo coming soon) which will soon house a Pterinochilus murinus (orange baboon) and a Lasiodora parahybana (salmon pink bird eater)‎.

I really want a B. Smithi, but cant justify spending $40-50 on a tiny sling.
 

Rittdk01

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 4, 2016
Messages
264
I have read that eco earth was the way to go. So, i made one brick of it. A little on the dry side. Iirc, it called for 16 cups of water. I made my batch with 13, and left it in the sun for 4-5 hours.

I have enough left over to fill two smaller deli cups (theres a reptile expo coming soon) which will soon house a Pterinochilus murinus (orange baboon) and a Lasiodora parahybana (salmon pink bird eater)‎.

I really want a B. Smithi, but cant justify spending $40-50 on a tiny sling.
Lp is great! I have three little lp's and a 7" af. U sure u want an obt? I have one and can understand their appeal, as it's one of thebest looking and beat eaters. Another that I got at the same time and with similarities but less aggression,would b the hapalopus sp. Columbiaor pumpkin patch. Mine eats like crazy, webs like crazy and molts right with my obt. Pumpkins are the best looking t's around imo.
 

gobey

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jun 20, 2014
Messages
291
I have read that eco earth was the way to go. So, i made one brick of it. A little on the dry side. Iirc, it called for 16 cups of water. I made my batch with 13, and left it in the sun for 4-5 hours.

I have enough left over to fill two smaller deli cups (theres a reptile expo coming soon) which will soon house a Pterinochilus murinus (orange baboon) and a Lasiodora parahybana (salmon pink bird eater)‎.

I really want a B. Smithi, but cant justify spending $40-50 on a tiny sling.

Keep searching

I got 5 B. emilia slings for $45
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,861
An OBT would be a terrible choice. There's 100's of super ts that would be significantly better choices. I'd urge you to reconsider this.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,861
post ventral pics of your rosie, it shouldn't be too difficult to sex at that size.

Also take a pic of the palps...often times people sell males when they mature as unsexed or even females....and they always get takers. It would be nice to confirm that this didn't happen to you.
 

Longislandboi85

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
1
I will post pics tomorrow. I have to go in the cage and wash out the water dish.

Im aware of how extremely agressive orange bitey things are. I still want one, maybe ill wait till ive been in the hobby for a year.
 

gobey

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jun 20, 2014
Messages
291
I will post pics tomorrow. I have to go in the cage and wash out the water dish.

Im aware of how extremely agressive orange bitey things are. I still want one, maybe ill wait till ive been in the hobby for a year.
I can tell you OBTs were the most frustrating slings I ever owned. They like to either hide completely. Or try to bolt.

Only spider I've ever had bolt out of an enclosure.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,861
Im aware of how extremely agressive orange bitey things are. I still want one, maybe ill wait till ive been in the hobby for a year.
Theyre always going to be around and they will always be crazy cheap (I've raised several to adulthood, and have 2 slings and still have yet to either search for or buy one).

Its so much more than just their defensive nature. Their speed is crazy, they are photosensitive (they despise light) and they hide a lot. Probably the most hidey spider I own, right there with my AF P. irminia. They are easily spooked and while at times calm, other times they just seem unstable.

But here's the thing, you'll get a sling, and love it and think, hey this is nothing...because as slings they're not defensive, and just web and dart around killing things. This instills confidence in the new keeper, how couldn't it....but they grow way faster than a keeper can advance, especially because nothing you see as a sling can prepare you for when it reaches that size where it becomes the devil's spawn. They then go from interesting, to a big worry.

Something with this much crazy speed and the willingness to use it at the drop of a hat, combined with their whack-a-mole mentality in their burrows make them a real escape risk for inexperienced keepers just trying to do simple maintenance, and the once interesting "pet", is no longer fun, but instead a stressor. It escapes and now you have to worry about the dog/cat/kids or whatever you share your home with. It would suck to get tagged, but it would be devastating to have one kill my dog.:anxious::sorry:

And because of the way they are and they way they suddenly get their defensiveness and they speed at which they get to this point from 1/2", it almost sets up a new keeper for such uncomfortable situations.

There are other beautiful brightly colored ts out there that are better choices, so many others its just crazy how lucky we are to be in the hobby when we are. Staying with NW for the first year is a good choice. I'd suggest something fast growing, and speedy from the NW for now to prepare you for a year from now.

N. incei "gold"View media item 38102 is a great one...beastly eaters, super fast growing and one of the fastest terrestrials around...a real treat to own...and there's also the olive color form (gold is recessive)
P. cambridgei is another, probably one of the best teacher ts for OW prep. Grow fast, eat like nothing else and are just an all around joy to raise and own...one of my all time favs to be honest....theyre also the largest member of the genus with females capable of 7"

And both of these species lack urticating hairs as well.


Good luck, with all the great species out there, I hate to see people just skip by so many of them in favor of advanced species that you will hardly see, with medically significant venom, insane speed and a desire to use both.

A year's not that long to wait anyhow, and the experience you can gain in that time will prove invaluable. I went a decade before I got my first OW, and as a result, I didn't suffer from the typical mistakes or difficulties...going slow makes for a seamless transition and that really makes the hobby a whole lot more enjoyable.


Notice no OBT pics...its because you cant photograph what you can't see;)
 

nicodimus22

Arachnomancer
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
709
Theyre always going to be around and they will always be crazy cheap (I've raised several to adulthood, and have 2 slings and still have yet to either search for or buy one).

Its so much more than just their defensive nature. Their speed is crazy, they are photosensitive (they despise light) and they hide a lot. Probably the most hidey spider I own, right there with my AF P. irminia. They are easily spooked and while at times calm, other times they just seem unstable.

But here's the thing, you'll get a sling, and love it and think, hey this is nothing...because as slings they're not defensive, and just web and dart around killing things. This instills confidence in the new keeper, how couldn't it....but they grow way faster than a keeper can advance, especially because nothing you see as a sling can prepare you for when it reaches that size where it becomes the devil's spawn. They then go from interesting, to a big worry.
In addition to that, please read what it's like to be bitten by one (especially an adult) if you haven't already: http://arachnoboards.com/threads/pterinochilus-murinus.133925/
http://arachnoboards.com/threads/pterinochilus-murinus.133925/
 

gobey

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jun 20, 2014
Messages
291
This is a common view of my girl.

I'm lucky she comes out a decent amount

But it's not uncommon for her to completely block off that hide for all of winter. 0126172237_HDR.jpg
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
There was a first hand account of an OBT bite here a couple years ago. Serious pain and cramps, the guy went to the hospital.

Some of the people who really want OBT's, are people should not ever have them.
 
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