New here, and need some peace of mind.

DJEggy

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
6
Howdy all, I'm new to this forum, and just finished my rookie year in tarantula keeping. But as always, no matter how much you think you know there's always a curveball thrown your way.

I've had my B. smithi for about 15 months, and never had any problems with her until this month. She molted over two weeks ago, she's pretty big now (about 6 inches), but I'm getting a little concerned because she isn't eating. Previously, by the 2nd week she's a cricket-devouring monster. Right now she's just avoiding moving at any cost, chilling under her bark, stretched out and lethargic.

I've kept the humidity around 65%, and clean water everyday, in case she needs it. I've read that some Ts will go months without eating after a molt, and I'm sure this is the case, but I'm just looking for peace of mind from you all.

In other newbie news, hi all! I look forward to contributing to this forum more as the years go on; stories, new purchases, advice seeking and giving, the whole deal. :)

My Cobalt was recently purchased. She's not quite full grown, and very skittish. Luckily, only once have I seen the threat posture, and that was when I was trying to get her to move to do some water dish maintenance. Left her alone for an hour, and she was off doing her own thing. She's not eating right now either, but I'm guessing that's due to stress. She just two nights ago found the pre-dug burrow I made.

My Suntiger I bought a few months ago, as a tiny little guy. He/she is about the size of a silver dollar, and its appetite is voracious. Unfortunately, today I saw two mites in there, so a substrate change is in order, which is always a fun adventure in deli cup capture.

I will get pics up as soon as I can of all three, plus the fourth when I decide what I want. :razz: I look forward to your comments and welcome wishes!

Gary
 

Hobo

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
Staff member
Joined
Jul 27, 2009
Messages
2,206
Hello, and welcome!

I went through the same thing, only with my 7" L. violaceopes. She finally came out after 3 weeks post molt, and I fed her yesterday, and she ate... Just under 4 weeks after her molt.

Maybe it's their size, or the time of year, who knows.
As long as she's got water, and she shows no real alarming symptoms, she'll be ok, I think.
 

DJEggy

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
6
That's my assumption as well, I just like to hear it too. :)

She's looking quite healthy, which is another reason I'm not overly concerned. Her abdomen is clean, round and even. All her legs and joints are looking fine, no blood or spots. I've just never seen her so lazy and uninterested in food. She just let the crickets crawl over her and back out of her den, so I took them back out. I'll try again in a week and hope for the best.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
1,659
Howdy all, I'm new to this forum, and just finished my rookie year in tarantula keeping. But as always, no matter how much you think you know there's always a curveball thrown your way.
Well howdy yourself! :) Welcome to the forum! :D

I've had my B. smithi for about 15 months, and never had any problems with her until this month. She molted over two weeks ago, she's pretty big now (about 6 inches), but I'm getting a little concerned because she isn't eating. Previously, by the 2nd week she's a cricket-devouring monster. Right now she's just avoiding moving at any cost, chilling under her bark, stretched out and lethargic.
First, I have a question for you. When you say she is about 6" how are you measuring that?

Second, when you say she is all stretched out, it makes me think that perhaps she is just not ready to eat. The hardening and stretching period gets longer as the T gets older/ bigger, so if the only thing it is doing that is troubling is not eating; I wouldn't worry, but would give her another week or so and then try again. You should be able to tell when it is ready to eat though, by looking for it to be in its hunting pose.

I've kept the humidity around 65%, and clean water everyday, in case she needs it. I've read that some Ts will go months without eating after a molt, and I'm sure this is the case, but I'm just looking for peace of mind from you all.
With this species there is no need to monitor the humidity, at all. :) Dry substrate and a large water dish that is always full is just fine for it. As long as it has water it will be fine without food for awhile. ;)

In other newbie news, hi all! I look forward to contributing to this forum more as the years go on; stories, new purchases, advice seeking and giving, the whole deal. :)
Wonderful! :D

My Cobalt was recently purchased. She's not quite full grown, and very skittish. Luckily, only once have I seen the threat posture, and that was when I was trying to get her to move to do some water dish maintenance. Left her alone for an hour, and she was off doing her own thing. She's not eating right now either, but I'm guessing that's due to stress. She just two nights ago found the pre-dug burrow I made.
The settling in period for Ts is always different, but now that she has discovered the burrow; I bet she eats soon.

My Suntiger I bought a few months ago, as a tiny little guy. He/she is about the size of a silver dollar, and its appetite is voracious. Unfortunately, today I saw two mites in there, so a substrate change is in order, which is always a fun adventure in deli cup capture.
If they are the little white mites, don't stress over them they are harmless. I definitely wouldn't change out the substrate when you have only seen 2. To get rid of them, dry out the enclosure and clean out any food remains. Then don't keep the enclosure so wet, clean up all boluses and you should be good. Changing out the substrate is stressful for a T, because it won't know that it is in its home anymore and will have to settle in again.

I will get pics up as soon as I can of all three, plus the fourth when I decide what I want. :razz: I look forward to your comments and welcome wishes!

Gary
I look forward to the pictures and once again, welcome to the forum! :)
 

DJEggy

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
6
Thank you for the advice. :)

To update, I went to remove the crickets I put in her home this afternoon, and she snapped one up right then and there. She's back to normal, and my worrisome attitude was all for naught. :wall:

And I measure her from the front of the front left leg to the back of the right rear leg. I haven't gotten an exact measurement because I haven't gotten her out yet, but I can tell she's about the size of my hand's span, which is 6.5 inches.
 

GartenSpinnen

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 17, 2005
Messages
1,408
Howdy all, I'm new to this forum, and just finished my rookie year in tarantula keeping. But as always, no matter how much you think you know there's always a curveball thrown your way.

I've had my B. smithi for about 15 months, and never had any problems with her until this month. She molted over two weeks ago, she's pretty big now (about 6 inches), but I'm getting a little concerned because she isn't eating. Previously, by the 2nd week she's a cricket-devouring monster. Right now she's just avoiding moving at any cost, chilling under her bark, stretched out and lethargic.
Tarantulas can go months sometimes without eating. I had a G. pulchripes go for almost an entire year without eating! I thought for sure she was going to die, but eventually she ate like crazy then eventually molted and her appetite became more routine. Some species like Aphonopelma seemani will hoard themselves up for months on end and you will not know they are alive or not. The same goes for many other 'pet hole' species, especially Haplopelma, and Hysterocrates sp.


My Cobalt was recently purchased. She's not quite full grown, and very skittish. Luckily, only once have I seen the threat posture, and that was when I was trying to get her to move to do some water dish maintenance. Left her alone for an hour, and she was off doing her own thing. She's not eating right now either, but I'm guessing that's due to stress. She just two nights ago found the pre-dug burrow I made.
I hope you provided lots of depth for your H. lividum to burrow in. This is a pet hole species and especially when they are WC and brought home can be very stressed and not burrow for sometimes weeks. It was a wise idea to provide a pre-dug burrow for her to take to. When they finally take to the burrow it is only a matter of time that you have a pet hole. Unless you didn't put in enough substrate... then you will have a very angry pet hole! Make sure you provide plenty of ventilation + humidity and make sure you give this species a water dish at all times. Sometimes they will go awhile without eating, it is wise to not leave feeders in or try to feed them too much before they get adjusted in a burrow.



My Suntiger I bought a few months ago, as a tiny little guy. He/she is about the size of a silver dollar, and its appetite is voracious. Unfortunately, today I saw two mites in there, so a substrate change is in order, which is always a fun adventure in deli cup capture.

I will get pics up as soon as I can of all three, plus the fourth when I decide what I want. :razz: I look forward to your comments and welcome wishes!
I often get mites within my enclosure and usually if you spot one or two you have hundreds of them. They are of minimal issue and can be combated (if your worried about them) by routinely removing feeders, lowering humidity while increasing ventilation. They really don't bother me anymore like they used to.
Welcome to the addiction!
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
1,659
Thank you for the advice. :)

To update, I went to remove the crickets I put in her home this afternoon, and she snapped one up right then and there. She's back to normal, and my worrisome attitude was all for naught. :wall:

And I measure her from the front of the front left leg to the back of the right rear leg. I haven't gotten an exact measurement because I haven't gotten her out yet, but I can tell she's about the size of my hand's span, which is 6.5 inches.
I am glad it is back to normal. :)
 
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